802.11a in intel Macs?

Discussion in 'Mac Pro' started by theBB, Jan 15, 2006.

  1. theBB macrumors 68020

    theBB

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2006
    #1
    http://www.macuser.com/hardware/even_more_80211_goodness.php

    claims that "A rather under-publicized feature of the new Intel Macs is that their wireless cards will be 802.11a capable. 802.11a never really became a common standard for consumer networking hardware, but some corporations adopted the standard."

    Apple's website says nothing of 802.11a, but the post sound quite certain. Does anybody have any info one way or another?
     
  2. theBB thread starter macrumors 68020

    theBB

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2006
    #2
    http://www.appleinsider.com/article.php?id=1465

    has a bit more info. It seems like new intel Macs do have 802.11a built-in, but I don't know whether you can seemlessly connect to a ".11a" network through OSX drivers/software, just as you'd connect to ".11b/g" networks.
     
  3. JeffTL macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2003
    #3
    I still have my Netgear 11a access point in a drawer; it sounds like it may not be quite obsolete yet.
     
  4. rendezvouscp macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    Long Beach, California
    #4
    Sounds good to me. That makes sense about the MacBook Pro presentation too. I won't use it, but it makes it "that" much easier to connect to any network wirelessly. :)
    -Chasen
     
  5. robo74 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2004
    Location:
    Near Chicago
    #5
    maclive article


    Something similar was posted there.
    I wonder if the macbook that was used was a "special" macbook so they could do their thing without a mixup from the "g" AP's.
    I guess we should know a answer soon.
     
  6. blueflame macrumors 6502a

    blueflame

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2003
    Location:
    Studio City
    #6
    centrino

    do the centrinos have a,b,g? if so, maybe we have new airport card too?
    andreas
     
  7. SiliconAddict macrumors 603

    SiliconAddict

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2003
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #7

    The irony of running Windows on a MacBook: you get to use more of the hardware. :p
     
  8. dubbz macrumors 68020

    dubbz

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2003
    Location:
    Alta, Norway
    #8
    The newest Centrino platform, Napa, dictates a, b and g... but that doesn't neccessarily mean that Apple have to use it. Centrino is just a marketing term after all, and I don't think Apple care about it.

    Though if Apple have just gone with the standard Intel wireless chip, then I guess it'll have support for all three.
     

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