Academic Software Academic Software

Discussion in 'Mac Apps and Mac App Store' started by robotrenegade, Oct 25, 2003.

  1. robotrenegade macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    Location:
    Greenville,SC
    #1
    Is there any difference from Macromedia Studio MX 2004 Academic and non-Academic? Besides the window saying academic.
     
  2. Schiffi macrumors 6502a

    Schiffi

    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    Missouri
    #2
    Not to my knowledge. Only that you can't sell the work you do legally.
     
  3. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2002
    Location:
    Gone but not forgotten.
    #3
    I bought that suite Thursday with Flash MX Professional. I haven't found any differences from the regular version. I've used the original MX suite at school and noticed no differences either.
     
  4. robotrenegade thread starter macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    Location:
    Greenville,SC
    #4
    That's what I thought, but you never know. Thanks guys
     
  5. shecky Guest

    shecky

    Joined:
    May 24, 2003
    Location:
    Obviously you're not a golfer.
    #5
    academic software is licensed only to produce non-commercial work. now the odds of getting caught on this hover around zero, but its still there.

    but..

    you also cannot try and write off academic software as a business expense on your taxes either. if you get audited, you have a problem.
     
  6. jenniff macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2004
    Location:
    Is Chicago, is not Chicago!
    #6
    Can you legally sell work that you have done on the computers at school, since the school computers likely bought Academic versions of the software?

    What if, say, a company purchased the retail Dreamweaver but attended a school, went on campus to work on Flash (etc.). Are there legal issues there?
     
  7. saabmp3 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2002
    Location:
    Tacoma, WA
    #7
    You cannot use any academic software for commercial use what so ever. This include computers bought on academic terms as well.

    BEN
     
  8. tech4all macrumors 68040

    tech4all

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2004
    Location:
    NorCal
    #8
    Interesting topic

    But what would you say for students who do work on a computer at a college/school and put that work into their portfolio so they can get a job?
     
  9. Graeme macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2005
    Location:
    Delta, BC
    #9
    They aren't making money on that work, they're just showcasing it to get a job to do paid work.

    As for the using a computer that was paid for under educational terms not being allowed to do paid work, are you sure? What about when the person is done school, they have to buy a new computer?
     
  10. Abulia macrumors 68000

    Abulia

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Location:
    Kushiel's Scion
    #10
    BZZZT! Wrong! :) Careful with that broad statement, chief.

    Adobe, for example, has a liberal use of their academic license; after school or whatever was your academic endeavor, you can use their software to product commercial works.
     
  11. tech4all macrumors 68040

    tech4all

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2004
    Location:
    NorCal
    #11
    No? But isn't the interview process that reviews the portfolio purpose for getting a job? Which in turn makes them money, thus it's commercial?

    There was a similar discussion on this in one of my classes. Only it dealt with images used off the internet such as Getty Images, and Corbiz and whether or not that would be legal.

    How long after a person completes school?
     
  12. Abulia macrumors 68000

    Abulia

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2004
    Location:
    Kushiel's Scion
    #12
    I just went to the Adobe website and they don't list this specification anymore at all. Apparently, (if I'm reading the license correctly) if you qualify for academic pricing you can use the software for anything.

    Read for yourself:
    http://www.adobe.com/education/purchasing
     
  13. ifjake macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2004
    #13
    what you can simply do to get the academic version messages to go away in macromedia software if one day you need to would be to open and save your work with a full version of the software. i guess you could have someone do this for you for a small fee or something. in a similar example i am working on a Director project for school. rather than have to be in the lab whenever i wanted to work on it, i downloaded the trial version which should last me until the due date. i won't need it afterwards because my major isn't multimedia at all, this assignment was just tacked on. the only problem with the trial version is that it puts a water mark on the screen "director mx trial version" or something. i can simply take it into the lab, open and save and it's gone. i believe the result should be similar for taking an academic project to a professional version of the software. if you're making money off of what you create with a company's software, upgrade to the full version. it should just be common courtesy.
     
  14. jenniff macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2004
    Location:
    Is Chicago, is not Chicago!
    #14
    However, the items in the portfolio in themselves are not what earns you money.

    Technically, the skills you gathered were built by using educationally-purchased software. Thus, Macromedia (or whoever) now owns your soul. You can never work for anyone, ever, using those skills. Mwahaha.
     

Share This Page