Adobe to End New Installs of Flash on Android as of August 15

Discussion in ' News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jun 29, 2012.

  1. macrumors bot


    Apr 12, 2001


    Last November, Adobe announced that it was ending development of Flash Player for mobile platforms, opting not to optimize the plug-in for new browser, operating system, and device configurations. Adobe's announcement came roughly a year and a half after Steve Jobs penned his "Thoughts on Flash" open letter outlining why Apple had decided not to allow Flash to run on its iOS devices.

    Now nearly eight months after Adobe's announcement, the company is officially pulling Flash from the Google Play marketplace for Android for new users. Those users who already have Flash installed on their Android devices will, however, be able to continue receiving updates.
    Adobe also notes that Flash is officially not certified for use with the upcoming Android 4.1 "Jelly Bean" previewed earlier this week, and users are encouraged to uninstall Flash if and when they update their Android devices to Jelly Bean.

    Article Link: Adobe to End New Installs of Flash on Android as of August 15
  2. macrumors member

    Oct 19, 2011
  3. macrumors 68000


    May 25, 2010
    Ohio, USA
  4. macrumors 6502

    Mar 5, 2012
  5. macrumors 6502a

    Jun 25, 2008
    Does this mean we no longer have to hear: "No flash? Yeah, that's a deal-breaker right there." from the anti-iOS folks?

    Oh well, at least they'll still have: "No removable battery? Yeah, that's a deal-breaker right there."
  6. macrumors 68020

    Apr 2, 2008
    where are all the people that said "no Flash on iOS ?! Apple is doomed !" ?
  7. macrumors 6502a


    Jun 15, 2010
    Cool, maybe they can now use the resources they have freed up to fix Flash for desktops? The current version keeps crashing doing relatively simple tasks such as streaming radio.:mad:
  8. macrumors 65816


    Apr 15, 2009
    They're in the "The SGIII is the best phone in the world, and Apple is doomed" forum.
  9. macrumors regular

    Jun 29, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
  10. macrumors regular


    Jul 30, 2009
  11. macrumors regular


    Jul 23, 2002
    Brownstown, MI
    Flash Developer - POV

    As a Flash Developer I can say this is good news. I have always disliked the flood of poor programming by sudo developers in Flash, this is one of the major reasons for issues with the Flash player, and welcome the hope that as Flash becomes an even smaller "niche" platform we begin to see fewer things developed in Flash, but much better quality for those things that are.

    I for one will not miss it on mobile and have always thought it to be a bad idea in the first place.
  12. macrumors 65816

    Apr 21, 2011
    opting not to optimize the plug-in for new browser, operating system, and device configurations.

    Translated to "we could not program or create a better version of our piece of sh-t program we bought off another company who bought off another company and didn't change for almost 14+ years"

  13. macrumors 601

    Jan 16, 2008
    Bristol, UK
    This will be problematic for companies like the BBC reliant on Flash for their products.

    We're not going to see the death of flash any time soon. There's no real alternative to it for protected video streaming (other than Silverlight, which is just Microsoft's version of Flash, so hardly different in concept - closed-source browser plugin.).
  14. macrumors member

    Jun 28, 2012
    If you observed things carefully it was on its way out for quite some time now. Just that Adobe was going through all 5 states a bit longer than anticipated.
  15. macrumors 68020


    Jun 22, 2006
    The thick of it
    There goes one of the main arguments I've kept hearing of why someone would choose Android over iOS. I guess arguments now will focus on "closed" versus "open."

    Noteflight, an online-based music creation tool, since its inception had a Flash interface. The developers just announced they're recoding their entire site to HTML5. That's huge! But it will open up the entire mobile market to them.

    In a way it's a shame. Flash had so much potential, but it seems Adobe just sort of let the software get bloated and irrelevant.
  16. macrumors member

    Oct 11, 2011
    Wont be sad to see it go completely, its a terrible resource and battery hog.

    Hopefully it will mean everyone mores to html5 that much sooner.
  17. miniroll32, Jun 29, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2012

    macrumors 6502a


    Mar 28, 2010


    Who's having the last laugh now, eh Adobe? This is even funnier than when Steve Jobs said "We opted for killer graphics" (aka. GeForce 320).
  18. macrumors G5


    Nov 25, 2005
    We'll still hear it, but only from RIM fans (does Blackberry run Flash? I don't know. I don't care).
  19. macrumors member

    Jan 15, 2009
    I'm happy flash is dead, but Android still has advantages over iOS:
    1) More choice in phones (which can lead to removable batteries, better cameras, various screen sizes, etc...)
    2) A less locked down app store. There can be browsers other than safari wrappers on the Google Play store.
    3) Being able to set default clients (email, browser, etc...)
    4) Google Maps. (I hope apple can pull off their own mapping solution, but google maps look better right now).
    Lots of other things I'm probably forgetting.

    But at the same time, iOS has a lot of nice things about it that I would miss if I moved to android (iPhone owner here, trying to decide what phone to get next):
    1) Better games (graphics support is more consistant on apple devices, so game devs have an easier time developing for these).
    2) Will continue to get firmware updates for years (though, google makes most of the apps that Apple has baked into the OS be updatable from the Play store, so not getting a new OS on android isn't too big of a deal).
    3) Nice consistent feeling. This has gotten better with Android ICS, but few people have that.
    4) Good customer support. When **** breaks with apple devices, their customer service rocks.
    5) Consistency. As much as people like the control android gives you, it tends to make troubleshooting these devices for computer illiterate people a lot more difficult.
  20. macrumors G5


    Nov 14, 2011
    I thought IE and Chrome had Flash build right into the browser i.e. not a plug in.
  21. macrumors 68030

    Oct 31, 2007
    London, UK
    I'd imagine they'll either switch to Silverlight or use AIR. Adobe isn't withdrawing AIR from Android, just the browser plugin.

    A bad day for the web. HTML5 doesn't do nearly enough yet, the creation tools are still very poor, and more content will be pushed to proprietary apps.

  22. macrumors 68000


    Feb 26, 2008
    64-bit Linux users will attest to the fact that the software was always bloated. That's why it took them so long to port it - apparently lots of it only really worked on Windows, Intel 32-bit systems.

    Anyway, good to hear it's dead. Now I want to see companies serving their HTML5-enabled sites to desktop users, too.
  23. macrumors 68000


    Jun 29, 2007
    No, it's a plug-in for all browsers.
  24. macrumors 65816

    Jan 8, 2009
    OK, so why does this MATTER so much to you? :rolleyes:

  25. macrumors 601

    Jan 16, 2008
    Bristol, UK
    Chrome simply maintains its own version of the plugin, which is automatically downloaded and updated when Chrome is.

    Internet Explorer doesn't include Flash Player.

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