All in one solution.

Discussion in 'Apple TV and Home Theater' started by Danmickread, Nov 12, 2012.

  1. macrumors newbie

    Nov 12, 2012

    I am new to ripping dvd's/blu-rays and so far have little experience with ripping music dvd's only using handbrake and the apple tv settings with ac3 pass through in order to maintain good dd5.1 surround sound.

    From what i understand handbrake cant rip protected movies correct?

    So if i want to rip a protected dvd or blu ray what is the best program to use, i also have macx dvd ripper pro but this only does dvd's?

    Is there a single piece of software for mac that will rip protected blu rays and dvds and encode them for apple tv.

    I have a couple of questions re macx dvd ripper as well.

    When i did tried to encode a dvd for apple tv no matter what i tried could not get the ac3 pass through to work, any ideas?

    Is mpeg-2 the original format on the dvd and when u do an mpeg-2 copy of the dvd is this an exact replica of the original quality or is compression applied?
    Is mpeg-2 the video codec or file name?
    Its all very confusing for a newb.


  2. macrumors member

    Jun 5, 2008
    Ok, I can answer a few of your questions, but you'll have to wait for somebody with more experience for the rest. First off, the best program to use for ripping Blu-ray is MakeMKV ( You can get a free trial during the beta. I believe a lifetime licence is $50, or it was when I bought it. It will encode each title from a blu-ray or dvd into an MKV, from there I use handbrake to encode it into a m4v file and put it into iTunes. You can also remux the MKV to a m4v, but there are certain restrictions on that and I just find it easier to re-encode it. Plus it gets you a smaller file size.

    I don't know anything about macx so I can't help you there, but I believe mpeg-2 is the container not the codex (don't quote me on that though). And I do believe it is an exact replica of the dvd quality (again, not 100% sure on this). Of course dvds are already compressed so it's not compression free, but I don't think it's compressed any more than a dvd is.
  3. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Nov 12, 2012
    Thanks for your help.

    If you encode twice ie to mkv then to m4v wont this be of worse quality?
    What is remuxing?

    I also have a ts file which is a 1080p direct ts stream or something of that nature and finder says the kind of file is an MPEG-2 Transport stream. So the file type is .ts and the video codec is MPEG-2?
  4. macrumors member

    Jun 5, 2008
    You will lose a bit of quality every time you encode something, but to me it's not noticeable (I don't worry about it, my 1080p re-encodes look gorgeous to me).

    Remuxing changes the container type without changing the codec. It's a lot faster than re-encoding and keeps the same quality. The trick is, it has to be the right codec inside (I believe the MKV has to have a h.264 codec for it to work, again this is where my knowledge on the subject gets a little fuzzy so take this with a grain of salt).

    TS is the type of MPEG-2 container that the file is, so yes, it is the file type. Yes, I believe MPEG-2 is the codec in this case.
  5. macrumors member

    Jun 5, 2008
    Just to add to my previous post, when remuxing, the codec has to be one that is accepted by the new container. If the codec inside the MKV container is one that can not be used in the mp4 container, the video has to be re-encoded into one that can be used inside the mp4 container.
  6. macrumors 68020

    Mar 15, 2012
    You will not lose any quality ripping from a disc to an mkv. You will lose a slight about of quality transcoding from and mkv to an mp4. With the right HB setting, whether it is noticeable is dependent on a lot of factors (tv size, viewing distance, visual sensitivity, etc). For me, (65" 13ft viewing distance), if I really focus on it, the BR may be just a bit softer. If I just watch the movie and don't make an effort to notice it...I don't.
  7. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Nov 12, 2012

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