american english

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by glosterseagul, Apr 29, 2004.

  1. glosterseagul macrumors regular

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    Mar 13, 2004
    #1
    I thought american english spelt theater and center not centre and theatre.

    I like the fact that we are so close but quite away apart at times...

    We visit LA ....

    My 11 daughter asked for a rubber for her prize! Rubber is an eraser. The look on the shop assistants face :eek:

    What differences have you noticed?

    eg in english
    Bloke = Man
    Fanny = female private part (at the front!)
     
  2. MongoTheGeek macrumors 68040

    MongoTheGeek

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    Its not so much where you are as when you are.
    #2
    You do get centre and theatre around the US occasionally. I live in Centre county actually.

    That Fanny thing always makes me laugh when I hear it.

    We also don't use fag to refer to a cigarette.

    George Bernard Shaw wrote we are "Two nations divided by a common tongue"

    In the musical My Fair Lady Prof Higgens laments "Why in America they haven't spoken it in years."
     
  3. jxyama macrumors 68040

    jxyama

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    Apr 3, 2003
    #3
    eggplant = aubergine

    vacation = holiday

    cell phone = mobile phone

    can't think of many others right now...

    i find the eggplant example most puzzling. it's some derivative of aubergine in french and other european languages, i believe...
     
  4. glosterseagul thread starter macrumors regular

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    #4
    Eggplant? never heard of one! :confused:

    We say scone you say biscuit we say biscuit you say cookie!
     
  5. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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  6. glosterseagul thread starter macrumors regular

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    #6
    LOL! :D

    In the FILMS (movies!) when I heard someone say he was an aloo-minum salesman I didnt know they meant alew-min-e-um salesman!

    although it is written alluminium as it sounds...in english! :)
     
  7. virividox macrumors 601

    virividox

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    #7
    cheers = thanks
    pissed = drunk, pissed = angry
    chick (girl) = bird (girl)

    etc etc
     
  8. glosterseagul thread starter macrumors regular

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    Mar 13, 2004
    #8
    and...what words might the brtits not heard of?

    eg

    doing bird
    blowing a raspberry
    dogging?
     
  9. Les Kern macrumors 68040

    Les Kern

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    Alabama
    #9
    It's "Going to THE hospital", not "Going to hospital", damnit!
    I lived in Walmer, Deal, Kent for a bit, and the very first person that spoke to me was a young boy who said "Likeagave soweekn get-UH pa-ew?" (He wanted a donation so they could get a school pool)
    I spent the first month not knowing what a soul was trying to say, but I got used to it.
     
  10. Flowbee macrumors 68030

    Flowbee

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    Alameda, CA
    #10
    'Theatre' is actually quite common in the US, especially as referring to live performance venues and companies. Several movie theaters (cinemas to some of you) have also adopted the more 'sophisticated' spelling (AMC Theatres).
     
  11. baby duck monge macrumors 68000

    baby duck monge

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    #11
    when getting on the subway (tube), you can't forget to watch your step (mind the gap). man, i love it. mind the gap, mind your head, mind this, mind that... :D
     
  12. Krizoitz macrumors 6502a

    Krizoitz

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    #12
    Actually it is written in America as aluminum, just like it sounds. It was in fact called aluminum before aluminium, and it was called alumium before either.

     
  13. Frohickey macrumors 6502a

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    #13
    Fanny is not only female private part. It could be the buttocks as well. You've heard of fanny packs, haven't you?
     
  14. whocares macrumors 65816

    whocares

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    #14
    I like how the Americans pronounce cities in New England:

    Nore-wich (US) = 'Norich' (UK)
    Green-wich = 'Grennich' (UK)
    How would you say Gloucesteshire in the US? :eek: :p :p


    Trunk = boot
    Truck = lory
    Trash = rubbish
    Chips = crisps
    French Fries = chips

    Oh, and in England, pedestrians walk on the pavement :eek: :eek: :eek: ;)
     
  15. Krizoitz macrumors 6502a

    Krizoitz

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    #15
    Ok if you wanted them pronounced without the W why put it in there, honestly ;)

    As for Gloucesteshire (which I believe is pronounced something like Glawstashire right?) I would think it would get rendered Glow-sest-ah-shire where the glow rhymes with now.

    You know I can understand refering to the hood as a bonnet, but the trunk as a boot thing never made much sense. I mean trunk is for storing things. But why would you put things in a boot?
     
  16. powerbook4me macrumors member

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    #16
    I think British speak is annoying....

    Flame away :p
     
  17. craigdawg macrumors 6502

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    #17
    I think we do a good job ruining Worstershire and Jag-wire.
     
  18. Krizoitz macrumors 6502a

    Krizoitz

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    #18
    I have always pronounced it Jag-whar as in rhymes with tar or bar
     
  19. whocares macrumors 65816

    whocares

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    #19
    I see you catch along quite quickly. ;)
    If I'm not mistaken, American prononciation is what it would have been in 'old' England when the first pilgrims left/arrived. I guessed we evolved and you didn't (ouch, that's was below the belt, wasn't it? :eek: ; j/k :p )
    If that is not the correct explanation (sarcasm put aside), well I guess the extra letters are there so we can easily differentiate between Americans and British... :D Mind you, most people in the States (or at least Texas) seem to think I come from Australia! :eek:


    And I really can't understand the rubber issue. IIRC rubber was first used for making, well rubbers, and not condoms...

    And to continue with cars (vehicules/automobiles?):
    Windscreen vs. windshield (I think)
    gas(oline) vs. petrol

    Or spelling
    Neighbour vs. neighbor
    colour vs. color
    modelling vs. modeling
    draught vs. draft

    I guess we just like keeping stuff uselessly complicated. ;)
     
  20. Westside guy macrumors 601

    Westside guy

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    #20
    Isn't it "Jag-u-ar"?

    Okay, how about Lieutenant vs. "Leftenant" (no idea if the British spell it differently, but there's an "f" slipped in there verbally somehow)

    How about the way your milk is delivered on a "float"?

    Oh! From the PBS special "The Story of English" - the way you pronounce "clerk" would be spelled "clark" in the US.

    Another car one: boot vs. trunk
     
  21. whocares macrumors 65816

    whocares

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    #21
    Nah, Aussie speak is annoying!





    -----------------
    Disclaimer
    This flamebait is merely here to bring or Aussie friends (or other anglophones) into the discussion.
    I believe that Canadian spelling is closer to British spelling?
     
  22. Apple Hobo macrumors 6502a

    Apple Hobo

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    #22
    check = cheque
    tires = tyres

    And how about laboratory (lab-er-tory) and luh-bor-a-tory. :D
     
  23. whocares macrumors 65816

    whocares

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    #23
    Just call them a lab! ;)
     
  24. Les Kern macrumors 68040

    Les Kern

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    #24
    Thanks for saying 'sophisticated' in quotes.

    Signed,
    The Ugly American :)
     
  25. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #25
    If cars have bonnets there, and women have bonnets here, do cars wear Easter bonnets there? :D (Actually, it's been a long time since I've seen a woman with an Easter bonnet here. They used to wear gloves too.)

    Spellings certainly are noticeably different at times--e.g. plough, plow, kerb, curb.

    Not only are there different spellings here, but few people care to actually pronounce the whole word. It's somewhat disturbing when they're also talking with their mouths full. Reading lips can be quite disgusting. :eek:

    I don't think you'll ever hear someone here say "half eight", only "eight thirty" or "half past eight".
     

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