Analysis: iPhone malware evolution on overdrive

Discussion in ' News Discussion' started by MacBytes, Nov 23, 2009.

  1. macrumors bot

    Jul 5, 2003
  2. macrumors 6502

    Feb 17, 2008
    People complain about the app store approval process, yet this seems to indicate that the process exists for good reason. And even if one or two malware apps make it to mainstream (after which Apple would quickly tighten up the approval process once again), it will still be light years ahead of any platform developed by Microsoft.
  3. macrumors 65816

    Jun 20, 2008
    Part of the old MR guard.
    Well said. The iPhone OS reflects upon Mac OS X's style of permissions. Unlike Windows' UAC, which even though you authenticate problems will still exist and happen, Mac's like "type in your password" will actually do the job.

    Type it in, install a game, no problem. Or an app. No problem running them.
  4. macrumors 6502a

    Feb 14, 2009
    um this has absolutely nothing to do with the approval process and everything to do with people just generally not knowing how to secure their phone properly when they 'free' it from apple.
  5. macrumors 68020


    Jun 22, 2006
    The thick of it
    And of course it's important to remember that none of the problems yet have occurred on standard iPhones. The article's title is misleading, implying that anyone who buys and legitimately activates an iPhone is in danger.

    Also, I wouldn't call two incidences "overdrive." The iPhone -- even jailbroken -- has been around three years. If it was such a risky platform to begin with, why has it taken so long?
  6. macrumors 6502a

    Feb 14, 2009
    um, because the jailbroken community is relatively really really small?
  7. macrumors 68000


    Jun 22, 2003
    NEWS FLASH: People who are reckless enough to void the warranty on their 500$ smart phone are also reckless enough to install questionable items on their iPhone.
  8. macrumors regular


    Oct 30, 2005
    Alberta, Canada
    An IT blog — er, sorry, news site — pounces on the faintest opportunity to spread mindless FUD about Apple platforms? Say it ain't so!

    They also conspicuously omit any mention of the fact that jailbroken iPhones and iPod touches are not even vulnerable to such worms unless the user goes the extra mile of installing SSH support, ignoring the warnings telling them to change their password (and instructions for doing so, easily accessible from the front page of Cydia), and leaving the service enabled all the time. But then, that wouldn't make for scintillating (or, more correctly, titillating) news stories.

    Further, I think there are a fair few software developers who might disagree with the portrayal of the App Store as a "Wild West" free-for-all, considering Apple's completely broken and nonsensical disapproval process.

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