Anyone commiting violent crime while high on Marijuana?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by PracticalMac, Dec 24, 2012.

  1. macrumors 68020

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    #1
    I have heard a lot about gun violence while drunk, PCP, or other drugs (cocaine and barbiturates come to mind). Maybe even caffeine OD?

    Never heard of a case of someone high on Marijuana go shoot someone.


    I ask this as I hear some say legalization of MJ will cause increase in violent crime, but that is dubious considering the typically sedative effects of MJ. A leading theory is the user himself has naturally strong violent tendencies, after all it is illegal.


    Of course, because it is illegal it makes it very difficult to do a proper scientific study, despite a potential for positive medical benefits.
     
  2. macrumors 603

    Joined:
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    #2
    The only violent crime that's going to be committed by someone who's stoned is assault on a cheetos bag and a case of mountain dew.


    Legalizing marijuana would take it's production and distribution out of the hand of illegal, black market entities (gangs, cartels, whatever). This will quite obviously reduce violent crime.
     
  3. macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

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    #3
    Surely some violent crime is committed under the influence of marijuana.

    However, I doubt legalizing it would increase violent crime, as some percentage of violent crime is associated with its illegal cultivation and sale.

    Here in Humboldt County there are a regular number of incidences of home invasions and even murder tied to the marijuana trade. If you could walk down to the liquor store and buy a bag, much of that should end.

     
  4. thread starter macrumors 68020

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    #4
    Exactly.
     
  5. macrumors 68000

    NickZac

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    #5
    It seems unlikely that someone who is stoned will be going on a rampage (unless the cottonmouth gets too bad to bear). Yet it is common for someone who is drunk to become belligerent and uncontrollable of both emotion and action...and yet we allow alcohol but not pot.

    It's the classic example of the failure of drug-policy in the US.

    Whether it is an assault on persons legitimately in pain through over-control of medication, a refusal to legalize things far less destructive than legal drugs, helping to employ the good folks who run cartels, misleading the public on the effects of certain drugs, or the SOP of locking someone up who smoked a little reefer with hardened criminals, drug policy been an across the board failure (and for many years has been the 'horse on the dining room table').
     
  6. macrumors 6502a

    SnowLeopard OSX

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    #6
    Move to California. Problem solved.
     
  7. TSE
    macrumors 68030

    TSE

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    #7
    I really don't see why Marijuana doesn't follow the same rules, laws, and sales policies as alcohol.
     
  8. macrumors 6502

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    #8
    I can safely say that after nearly twenty days of legal cannabis I have personally avoided committing violent crimes entirely, while using it and while not.
     
  9. macrumors 68020

    sviato

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    #9
    It's harder to control and tax for the government.
     
  10. macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

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    #10
    Why is it harder than any other crop or product to tax and control?
     
  11. macrumors 68020

    sviato

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    #11
    I think it's because it's too easy for people to grow a sufficient amount in their basement and distribute to whomever they please. This way they aren't buying from the government and likely aren't charging and remitting sales tax when they sell it lol

    As a contrast, it's much more difficult to make good alcohol at home consistently
     
  12. macrumors G3

    Renzatic

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    #12
    What about tobacco? I could grow some in my back yard and sell it to a few friends and neighbors for far less than what you could pick up a pack of smokes at the local quik-e-mart for.

    Yeah, you might have a few people doing it here and there, but I doubt it'd become popular to the point you have everyone and their grandma firing up a hydroponics farm in their basement. It wouldn't be nearly widespread enough that it'd undercut the government.
     
  13. macrumors 65816

    citizenzen

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    #13
    I imagine like most things, if you could run down to the market a buy a half-way decent product for a half-way decent price, that would discourage most people from trying to produce it themselves.

    It works for me.
     
  14. macrumors 68000

    NickZac

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    #14
    I would go as far to say it can PREVENT violent crime. It's potential medical value for the control of chronic pain and some psychological issues has been established. One of the biggest advocates of legalization, Gary Johnson, is advocating it because he personally used it after a severe injury to control severe pain. His first hand experience was enough to convince him of the value (and safety) of the drug.
     
  15. macrumors Penryn

    rdowns

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    #15


    Easily solved. Charge a licensing fee to grow it and regulate how much one can grow legally.
     
  16. macrumors 68020

    sviato

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    #16
    That's easily flawed. What stops the same people who grow it illegally now from continuing to do so and not paying any fees?


    That said, I'm no expert on this issue. Although to be honest it's probably more expensive for the government to be completely against it rather than for it and have some people not following the rules on the side. The costs of enforcement seem to outweigh the benefits.
     
  17. macrumors Core

    Dagless

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    #17
    There was a chap at my school years ago who used to attack other pupils after smoking cannabis, he would ask others if they had a pen, and when they looked in their bag he would hit/jump on them. It was quite weird! He was a frequent user and I think only attended school to buy drugs.
     
  18. macrumors 6502a

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    #18
    Once, a long time ago, I ordered two large pizzas and a family size coke bottle.
     
  19. macrumors demi-god

    LethalWolfe

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    Los Angeles
    #19
    People can grow at home and sell it for a profit because its current illicit nature puts a premium on price. Make it as available as beer, cigarettes and cough medicine and watch the price fall like a rock while the convenience factor goes through the roof.

    Sure some people will still grow their own (just like some people make their own beer or have their own vegetable garden) but the cottage industry that exists today will largely go up in smoke (pun intended) once commercial-sized growers put economy of scale into the equation. Even if a local grower could price competitively he/she would still need an accessible store front (which makes it easier for customers and the tax man to find you) because once customers can buy it at the corner store no one is going to mess with a clandestine meetup in order to buy weed.

    Will 100% of it be taxed? No, but 100% of sales & services aren't taxed on anything (there are businesses in every city where a cash payment will get a discount and a sale off the books) but the vast majority of it will be taxed because to the vast majority of people paying the tax will be less of a headache than trying to avoid it.
     

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