Anyone here do Tool and Die?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by haiggy, Oct 3, 2006.

  1. haiggy macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    #1
    Just curious...

    I'm finishing up highschool and I'm not sure what I want to do yet. I have a make a decision soon so I am just gathering thoughts and ideas from as many sources as I can. Tool and Die sounds interesting to me (from what I know about it). Is this anyone's job? Just a few questions:

    How did you start out?
    What does your job include?
    What exactly do you do?
    How long is a typical work day/what are hours like?
    Do you enjoy it?
    How did you come about this job... apprenticeship, etc...

    Thanks a lot!
     
  2. haiggy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
  3. wimic macrumors regular

    wimic

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    Location:
    calgary, alberta
    #3
  4. haiggy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    #4
    Yeah some people don't know what it is.

    Anyone else?
     
  5. vouder17 macrumors 6502a

    vouder17

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2003
    Location:
    Home
    #5
    it seems like no one survived to tell the tale:eek: :D :p

    /giggle
     
  6. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #6
    Sounds like you might want to pursue an ME degree as a good place to start.
     
  7. timnosenzo macrumors 6502a

    timnosenzo

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2004
    Location:
    ct, us
    #7
    My father is a Tool & Die maker. Are you looking to do the engineering part of it or actually work on presses?
     
  8. haiggy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    #8
    ME Degree?
    Mechanical Engineer? Master of Engineering? What do you mean?

    And I'm not sure... either or. I was just checking out the occupation and wondering if anyone was one.
     
  9. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #9
    Sorry, Mechanical Engineering. Lot's of the fundamentals of how and why materials function the way they do.

    Have you spend much time with tools? In a shop?
     
  10. haiggy thread starter macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    Ontario, Canada
    #10
    lol Not really. And I can't apply for Mechanical Engineering because I didn't take physics. I really have no idea what I want to do after highschool. Such a hard decision. I just made this thread to get info about tool and die makers. I researched it and it says you can become one through apprenticeship and college education (not hardcore). Requirements from Grade 12 are College English, College Math, Grade 10 Science and Grade 12 College Physics (which is basically general knowledge on physics) lol

    I am an 85% + average student... I take English, Calculus, Data Management, Kinesiology, Chemistry, and Earth and Space Science (all of which are university level classes -- if there is confusion about that... this is how they are divided in Canada.. well.. Ontario anyways). I don't take physics -- it just doesn't work with my brain... either that or I had a very bad grade 10 teacher (I'm inclined to believe its a little bit of both). Anyways, without physics you can't really do much... I think?

    I love computers. I've been good with them since I was in grade 1... seriously. I just can't program well, etc... so computers is kind of out of the question.

    No idea what to do. lol Sorry, this is kind of off topic and random and just ranting but yeah. Sorry for any confusion if there is any.

    I'm kind of stressed. I have to decide soon and I don't want to make the wrong decision. I want to do something I enjoy and I can live off of.
     
  11. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #11
    You best get over your phobia of physics if you want in on that field. No physics = no understanding of the mechanics of materials, let along statics or dynamics.

    It's not unusual to be confused about what you want to do with your life at 17.
     
  12. RedTomato macrumors 68040

    RedTomato

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2005
    Location:
    .. London ..
    #12
    Do't go locking yourself into such a specialised field so young if you have no clear idea what you want to do.

    As the linky above says, only the best tool & die makers will get secure employment, as there's a decline in employment in this area due to increased technology and globalisation.

    If you have a passion for it, go for it. (and get some physics) If you don't, then don't.

    try to keep up with a general grounding - english, maths, a science, a humanity, and some arts. Don't forget to work on your social skills and seeing the world, that'll help you in whatever you want to do.

    When I was 17, I didnt know what I wanted to do either. I applied for degrees in engineering, and started a degree in Artificial Intelligence, before realising it wasn't what I wanted to do.

    Now, via a very long and complicated route, I've ended up currently studying British sign language, and have several small jobs making and editing sign language films, lecturing on art in BSL at a local gallery, working as the chief tech officer for a small deaf theatre company, and also am building up a practice as a theatre lighting designer.

    All these small part-time jobs are both technical and creative and I had no idea any of these field of work existed or that I could actually do them till a few years ago.

    So give yourself time, go for what interests you and work hard on it, and you'll be ok.
     
  13. Dieguy518 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2006
    Location:
    TN
    #13
    Tool and Die

    Tool and Die is an excellent trade,if that is what you want to do.Walter Reuther,the founder of UAW,was a tool and die guy.He said "That once you are fully trained tool and die guy, you can make or fix anything".I have been in the business for 40 years and have trained over 200 apprentices,the commanality of successful ones is to be able to think for yourself(self starter),like mechanical things,like working on cars,be able to work in a group and communicate well,be a problem solver.Good math skills are needed,but most of the calculating and all is done with CAD and CNC.My son is in Tool and Die and does over $75,000 annualy with overtime.Lots of plants in Southern US are in the $20.00 to $25.00 per hour range.It takes time,usually 4 year apprentice plus experience.In Ontario check wtd.com,one of the best tool and die in North America.Check Magna International,Frank Stronach who started Magna was a tool and die guy. Remeber to have fun with whatever you do.E-Mail me if you have questions jpeck@parristool.com
     
  14. wise tool macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2008
    #14
    Not sure you found the answer yet after two years. Anyway, this is not a easy job, reward not really equal to effor putted in, but full of changllences and lot of job satifaction....
    Gd luck!
    Tool Die Design
     
  15. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2001
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #15
    I don't know a whole lot about tool & die specifically, but if you can handle calculus, you can handle physics. Physics is more or less just calculus word problems at practically every level. I'm betting on the "bad teacher" thing. Give it another try, because this could be a stumbling block for any material sciences sort of career. In the meantime, T&D seems very much like the kind of career where you'd want to seek out a local shop and look for apprenticeship opportunities while your education progresses.

    EDIT: Heh... oh wait, this is old. :)
     

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