Anyone watch/watched Neon Genesis Evangelion?

Discussion in 'Community' started by mmmdreg, Aug 4, 2002.

  1. mmmdreg macrumors 65816

    mmmdreg

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    Apr 14, 2002
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    #1
    A friend made me watch the whole series of episodes on DVD (that he bought) and now I'm waiting for the moviez that follow the episodes to be released in English...Basically, it is an anime (yeah I know, kids stuff) but it is based more on being philosophical than action stuff....it's quite interesting if you get into it...so has anyone seen it?
     
  2. ShaolinMiddleFinger macrumors 6502a

    ShaolinMiddleFinger

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    Oct 12, 2001
    #2
    i heard it started a real cult in japan....not cult status...but the fans started a whole religion based upon it.....kind of scary if you think about it....
     
  3. djwoolf macrumors member

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    Dec 19, 2001
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA
    #3
    ive seen the toys and the dvd's but I havent been able to buy anything yet looks cool though
     
  4. Soma_Addict macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2002
    #4
    yeah, i've seen it...

    yes, i have seen the whole series multipule times. the movies are good, they really wrap up the whole thing better then the last two episodes did.

    the story is actually very very deep if you know what to look for. there is a lot of back story that is not explained and takes abit of research. also knowing the bible backwards and forwards gives a lot of insight.
     
  5. mischief macrumors 68030

    mischief

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    Aug 1, 2001
    Location:
    Santa Cruz Ca
    #5
    I started watching the Japanese 50 minute episodes.

    But got fed up with them being so short with fuzzy little subtitles. Good overall animation. I got a bit sick of the kid freaking out like a pansy.:rolleyes:
     
  6. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

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    Sep 18, 2001
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #6
    You're supposed to get sick of the kid freaking out like a pansy.

    The series itself is fantastically intricate, and by itself challenges the "yeah I know, kids stuff" attitude mmmdreg posted initially. I don't think there's any amount of editing that could make the series conform to what Americans expect from animation. It's startlingly depressing. There are no heroes or role models anywhere to be found. If you don't wind up wanting to slap the crud out of everybody (except maybe the penguin) then you're just not paying attention.

    The stuff that gets translated into English and shown on afternoon TV is kids' stuff. Pokemon is kids' stuff. There's plenty of anime that never makes it to mainstream U.S. media, geared towards older crowds. The more mature things don't make it to the U.S. because Americans can't seem to wrap their brains around animation that doesn't conform to the patterns established by the likes of Bugs Bunny and the Smurfs.

    Last year, for instance, I got to see an anime remake of Fritz Lang's Metropolis, based on a manga by Osamu Tezuka (creator of Astroboy, one of the forerunners of modern anime). It was one of the most gorgeous things I've ever seen in a theater. Yet again, though, this challenges the American notion of what animation is supposed to be.

    But almost more interesting than NGE itself is the phenomenon surrounding it. Here you have an auteur (Hideaki Anno) executing a labor of love, trying to distill and communicate an idea about the way world works which I believe represents lessons Anno himself learned from long, difficult personal experience. Otaku (fanboys) immediately latch onto it... and worship the series while utterly failing to grasp the idea Anno was trying to communicate. The movies which follow the series are born of Anno's sheer frustration at failing to reach his audience. They are tantamount to a colossal "f... you" to the clueless fanboys. The fanboys still don't get it. One of the funniest things I've ever seen was an effort at a doujinshi (fan art) sequel series. Watch the entire series and then tell me where you get a sequel.

    Oh, and don't let anyone tell you it's a religious allegory. Those people are just distracted by the symbolism. The religious angle is just a vehicle.
     
  7. Soma_Addict macrumors member

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2002
    #7
    Just a vehicle?

    I think there is more to the religious angel then just a vehicle. wouldn't you agree that the use of religious references mixes well with past human attempts to explain reality and life itself. that is an issue the Neon Genesis addresses, but with more resolve then the bible could ever give.
     
  8. Dr. Distortion macrumors regular

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    May 2, 2002
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    Eindhoven, the Netherlands
    #8
    There are a lot more intriguing anime series out there, like FLCL and Lain.

    If you want to get in touch with groups who translate unlicensed anime you could join #rg or #mae on irc.aniverse.com

    -Dr. D.
     
  9. AlphaTech macrumors 601

    AlphaTech

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    Oct 4, 2001
    Location:
    Natick, MA
    #9
    of course

    I have all the dvd's and the subtitles are easily readable (at least on a quality tv :eek: ).

    If you are looking for a new series, check out Gasaraki. They have 8 dvd's at present, all of them are worth watching. The latest release of Bubblegum Crisis is extremely well done. I also recommend getting/watching SolBianca (three dvd's).

    Well, all this anime thought makes me want to watch the last three dvd's of Gasaraki (6,7 and 8). With the temperature being decent again (aka nice and cool, tank you canada :p) I won't have to crank the surround sound system to hear it over the AC. :p :D
     
  10. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

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    Sep 18, 2001
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #10
    Well, understand what I mean by "just a vehicle" is that the religious aspect sets up a context that frames up the behavior of the characters. The juxtaposition with mythic images makes the human frailty of the characters all the more significant. The religious symbolism reinforces the story, but it is not, in itself, the story. I've frequently seen people evaluate it as such.

    An example of religious allegory is the work of C. S. Lewis. Lewis was himself deeply spiritual and very deliberately wrote stories which were intended to convey Christian ideas. Aslan the lion is well understood to be a representative Christ figure, for example. NGE is not about religion. It's highly humanistic. In fact I believe that a Western mythos (consisting of Christian, Judaic and pre-Judaic imagery) was chosen because it's foreign, which means the native audience would be less likely to interpret in terms of religion. After all, when you (assuming you're culturally Western) see Buddhist ideas (for instance) represented in fiction, you don't start reevaluating the entire story with regard to how it fits into the Buddhist tradition. But when you see heavy Christian symbolism, you have to wonder what religious point the author is trying to make. I could be way off, but I tend to assume the converse is going on with something like NGE.

    So all I'm saying is, don't watch NGE and try to figure it out in relation to Judeo-Christian cultural cues. The religious symbolism is there more to set a tone than to deliver a message.
     
  11. Gelfin macrumors 68020

    Gelfin

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2001
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    #11
    I'm not familiar with FLCL (it's hard to get me to pick up a series I haven't seen before), but you're absolutely right about Lain. I'm not sure I would say Lain is more intriguing than NGE. In fact, I'm not sure there are many points where you can compare the two that way. They are both brilliantly executed.
     

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