Anytown USA

Discussion in 'Community' started by oldschool, Oct 30, 2004.

  1. oldschool macrumors 65816

    oldschool

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    #1
    Do you live in a small town in the USA? Even a city...whatever.

    Just tell me what its like (what it was like) as a teenager where you live. Maybe some stories. Maybe some anecdotes. Any weird characters? What did you do on a saturday night?
     
  2. Nermal Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #2
    Where's your Location tag gone? :confused:

    And, to answer your first question: No.
     
  3. mgargan1 macrumors 65816

    mgargan1

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2003
    Location:
    Reston, VA
  4. oldschool thread starter macrumors 65816

    oldschool

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    #4
    hahaha i forgot to add: DON'T mention which town you live in.
     
  5. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #5
    Mine was a medium, up and coming community... but I still can't believe that my parents had me walk a couple of miles home from school in the 4th grade! :eek: Would anyone let their kids do that today??
     
  6. musicpyrite macrumors 68000

    musicpyrite

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Cape Cod
    #6
    As a teenager, I lived in California, Georgia, and Massachusetts.

    In California, there were about 50,000-60,000 people year round.
    In Georgia, when school was in session there were about 90,000-100,000. Other wise, there were about 70,000.
    Here on Cape Cod, in the city I live in, there are about 35,000 people in late fall, winter, and early spring. During the tourist season, there are about 130,000. And their driving habits suck! :mad:
     
  7. Frozone macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2002
    Location:
    Atlanta, Georgia
    #7
    I live in a town of about 1000, but it's one of the smaller towns in my County. The town center has about 18,000 people so it's much larger. I personally love living in a small town, though I wouldn't mind living in a large city. Most of the time people here just go to the movies are drive about 40 minutes down the road to a city with over 100,000 people. But, the atmosphere and the people here are nice which is what I like.
     
  8. poopyhead macrumors 6502a

    poopyhead

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2004
    Location:
    in the toe-jam of greatness (Fort Worth)
    #8
    I spent the second half of my childhood in a kinda small town
    in the early part of high school (before the super walmart)
    we used to cruise the old walmart and ingles parking lot in the back of pickup trucks hollerin' at the women folks. later when we got the superwalmart (at one time the largest in the south east, talk about culture) we would cruise that parkinglot too although it was not nearly as fun. I remember when the town over got a dwarf house chik fil a that was a big deal and it was always fun to take dates through the small door in the actual dwarf house. now the city has grown, they ve turned one of the old mills into low rent lofts and most buisness has moved across 75. When i moved there it really had a small town atmospher (everyone spent friday nights at one of the highschool football games) now it has boomed with people fleeing north fulton.
     
  9. Counterfit macrumors G3

    Counterfit

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2003
    Location:
    sitting on your shoulder
    #9
    That's saying quite a bit coming from a Masshole ;) :D
     
  10. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #10
    Hmmmm... I think I live in your neighborhood poopyhead... south of Hartsfield-Jackson.

    In HS, the thing to do was to cruise through the Shoney's after the Friday night football games. At the time, it was the only thing in town! We would crank up our 8 track tape players and roll the windows down so everybody would hear us.

    I can remember gas for less than 20¢ when the Tenneco and Hess stations had a gas war. I remember the original $2 bill and using it to buy a tank of gas. My '68 VW Bug would ride forever on a tank for $2.

    Back in the day....
     
  11. oldschool thread starter macrumors 65816

    oldschool

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    #11

    what is shoneys?
     
  12. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #12
    Ahhhh... Shoney's... home of the "Big Boy" burger. The ultimate "drive in" diner where they hung the trays of burgers and shakes on your car window just like in the movie American Graffiti. It was built for "cruising"... just driving through, round and round, to show off your car and to be "cool". While my '68 VW would get some attention today... in '73 it was not exactly a showstopper.

    The Shoney's 'Big Boy' was a statue that was out front of a pudgy (OK fat) boy holding up a rather large burger.
     
  13. oldschool thread starter macrumors 65816

    oldschool

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2003
    #13
    ohhh i thought big boy was the name of the restaurant...

    i remember the restaurant from american graffiti. it was great.
     
  14. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #14
    for the most part, i have lived in towns or cities under 20,000 people, or less-way less, but i did one semester in london and that was completely overwhelming for a small townie like me

    being relatively near san francisco is a good thing so i can be near the great culture of that city but not have to deal with the traffic and crime major cities are known for...sometimes the rural life does not have the best access to culture and exposure to new ideas and people have a greater chance of accidentaly dating or marrying a distant relative ;)
     
  15. musicpyrite macrumors 68000

    musicpyrite

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2004
    Location:
    Cape Cod
    #15
    I've lived in 4 different states, 5 different houses, have traveled from California to GA/NC several times both ways, and have traveled from Georgia to Massachusetts, been all up and down the Eastern part of the US ( Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania, New York, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, also every state south of Iowa (if you drew an imaginary line through the center of Iowa)) so I think that I am quite capable of saying that, particularly in the tourists season, they driving does suck. :p :p :p

    That was one long run on sentence.
     
  16. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #16
    Yeah, I thought Big Boy was the name of the restaurant, too. I knew there was a Shoney's, but I thought its logo was just the words Shoney's in some stylized font...Hmm...

    //Checking Google...

    Processing...

    Processing...

    Processing..

    Here it is. The restaurant Big Boy does exist; we weren't mad, after all, oldschool. Shoney's website (here) seems to show that Shoney's does not have any fashion of a "big boy" logo, after all. It, indeed, is a stylized text logo. As far as a mascot, it looks like the Shoney's bear is a mascot and heads up the 'Cub Club.' There's some digging for ya.
     
  17. MacDawg macrumors P6

    MacDawg

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2004
    Location:
    "Between the Hedges"
    #17
    Perhaps my memory is faulty about the Shoney's Big Boy... it was the 60's after all :)

    I would have sworn the two were combined

    Processing...

    Processing...

    Processing...

    I was right!


    "BIG BOY restaurants were a national icon by the fifties. They began as Bob's Big Boy restaurants (originated by Bob Wian) in California, and became one of the first successful franchises. Soon other Big Boy operations spread out across the country. Names such as JB's, Azars, Kips, Marc's, Frisch's, Manner's, Shoney's and more all had "Big Boy" attached to their names, and all served the popular double decker hamburger from California to Connecticut. "
     

    Attached Files:

  18. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #18
    Ah, ok, cool...You learn something new every day. I guess one of these chains finally sat down and copyrighted to name and logo, and thus the only Big Boy in town these days is Big Boy. I also misread your post, I think, since I thought you were talking about the present as opposed to the 60s.
     
  19. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #19
    i remember the neighboring town (pacific grove, ca - america's last hometown) had a bob's big boy...pacific grove was small, maybe 12,000-15,000 people, but it had stop lights, wide streets, and those corporate street signs that you see everywhere...some neighboring towns like carmel, carmel highlands, and del rey oaks were much smaller in population and mostly used wooden street signs or small metal signs...both hard to read... and were more rural and quaint than pacific grove

    those smaller towns in the area would never allow a major national chain like big boys to get their business into the city limits...oh, and those three cities mentioned don't have a mcdonald's and would never let the influence of such a big city thing to corrupt the small town/small minded folk
     

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