Apple and the world crisis

Discussion in 'Apple, Industry and Internet Discussion' started by raynold2010, Nov 27, 2012.

  1. raynold2010, Nov 27, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2012

    macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    #1
    Guys, I'm looking for some lights here.

    Live in Europe, where we hear about the crisis every ******* day. Salaries cuts here, factories closing there, taxes and joblessness are ramping up, looks like the worst context in decades. In the US things are not so good too.

    And Apple continues to thrive to never-seen-before levels. People are queuing for hours to spend their hard-earned cash on technology they seldom need, re-selling old iPads for new ones six months after they've been issued.

    How do you make these two things correlate? I know consumerism is not always rational. But here, the discrepancy between the economic context and consumer attitude seems gigantic--just beats me. :confused:
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    decafjava

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Location:
    Geneva
    #2
  3. macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2007
    Location:
    An Island in the Salish Sea
    #3
    Or.... people aren't actually quite as badly off as the news media are depicting. There is a good reason for the politicians to preach doom&gloom... if you get people scared, you can manipulate them. It could be that there are loads of people who are doing fine, and just assume they are the exception and not part of the majority.

    We've been lucky here in Canada though, so it's hard to judge first hand. Things could be as bad as the media are showing... we just don't have the 1st hand experience in the GWN.

    Did you see that our Central Banker is moving to the Bank of England?
     
  4. thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    #4
    Yeah, it's so true. But you're from Switzerland... not a country with economic problems.

    I'd like to see some sale numbers for Spain, Italy, and especially Greece. Did you hear about Apple stores closing in those crisis-ridden countries? Not me.
     
  5. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #5
    The "crisis" is overblown. 95% of college graduates are still working and they can afford expensive electronics. Don't forget Samsung is rolling in dough too.
     
  6. macrumors 65816

    decafjava

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Location:
    Geneva
    #6
    Well, actually I'm an ex-pat Canadian in Switzerland and yes both countries have been battered less than others in the last few years.

    FWIW, I don't know the sales figures of Apple in the countries you mentioned but do know I saw relatively few smartphones and even fewer iphones when I spent a week in Greece last summer. I saw one single ipad, that one being used by an Asian tourist.
     
  7. RSL
    macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 6, 2012
    #7
    I see no contradiction in the fact that a few companies are doing well when the world economy is tanking. You have to make a distinction between a global phenomenon and a local phenomenon (one company). Analogy: whilst the earth is warming globally, some places are not feeling the heat.
     
  8. thread starter macrumors member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2010
    #8
    Thank you for the testimony !

    A part of the answer is here

    http://www.grreporter.info/en/there_no_crisis_apple_products_greece/7726

    Mr. Pritis, how does the crisis affect the sales of Apple products?

    There is no crisis for us. The people who buy Apple products are their greatest fans and prefer them purposefully. Customers buying cell phones of some of the most popular brands do not come to our shop. They continue to buy their new products.
    Our customers buy only Apple products.

    What is the profile of your customers?

    The range is great. From a professional point of view, they are people from those who are dealing with new technologies to lawyers, physicians and others. Of course, the majority of them have better than average financial means. In terms of age, our customers are also very different. They start from 16-year-olds who clearly do not buy the products with their own money and end at the elderly. For example, our support technician has a meeting now with a 70-year old woman who has an iPad.
     

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