Apple Executives Consider Thirty Years of Macintosh, Say iOS and OS X Convergence 'A Non-Goal'

Discussion in ' News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jan 23, 2014.

  1. macrumors bot


    Apr 12, 2001

    To celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of the unveiling of the original Macintosh -- tomorrow, January 24, 2014 -- Macworld has published a lengthy interview with three Apple executives to discuss where the Mac has been, and where it is going. Senior Vice President of Worldwide Product Marketing Phil Schiller, Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Craig Federighi, and Vice President of Software Technology Bud Tribble -- who was a member of the original Mac development team -- all shared their thoughts and the full article is well worth a read.

    Among the more interesting tidbits from the interviews is one particular statement from Federighi, where he notes that while iOS and OS X do share some cross-pollination of features and design, they will not become one operating platform without good reason. He says that the Mac has "been honed for over 30 years to be optimal" for keyboards and mice, while attaching a touchscreen to a PC -- or a keyboard to a tablet -- without a good reason to do so makes for a bad experience.

    Macworld editor Jason Snell mentions that though he brought an iPhone, iPad and MacBook Air to the interview at Apple's Cupertino campus, he ultimately chose to take notes on the MacBook -- something not lost on the Apple execs.
    Schiller said Apple believed that the Mac "keeps going forever" because its differences make it really valuable. The current Mac lineup looks very different from what Steve Jobs introduced thirty years ago, but Apple clearly considers it crucial to the future of the company.

    Images courtesy Shrine of Apple

    Article Link: Apple Executives Consider Thirty Years of Macintosh, Say iOS and OS X Convergence 'A Non-Goal'
  2. macrumors 6502a

    Sep 22, 2012
    This is good, I don't think we really need them to merge at the moment. Maybe in the future, but for now I prefer having the laptop form factor at home - vastly preferable to the tablet keyboard, for one. I think tablets work well for viewing media, not so much for creating it or even writing things, etc.
  3. taptic, Jan 23, 2014
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2014

    macrumors 65816


    Dec 5, 2012

    That was scary for a little while there.... thought we were in for a Windows 8 move with all that talk of a 12 inch iPad and everyone wanting a more advanced OS on it.
  4. macrumors regular

    Aug 5, 2011
    Hi-hip-hooray! So glad to hear they aren't following in Microsoft's footsteps on this. Keep doing what you do :apple:.
  5. macrumors 68020


    Sep 25, 2012
    I'm glad to hear this, it's something we needed to hear (that there are no grand plans to merge OSX and iOS).

  6. macrumors 603


    Aug 23, 2012
    McKinney, TX
    As long as they still seamlessly work together, I'm 10000% behind this line of thinking!

    Next "goal" - making iOS AirDrop and OSX AirDrop the same thing :D
  7. macrumors member

    Feb 26, 2008
  8. macrumors 604

    Jul 29, 2003
    Silicon Valley
    The evening after the 30th anniversary, there's an special event of some sort at Flint Center in Cupertino (where the Mac was originally introduced 30 years ago):

    Also some sort of unconference.

    These events don't seem to have any sort of official Apple, Inc. sponsorship.

    Anyone here going?
  9. macrumors regular

    Jun 15, 2008
    New York, NY
    I think it's definitely a good thing to keep macbooks and tables/phones disjointed but not so much iOS and OSX. I definitely see some value in the rumored ipad pro having more OSX elements.
  10. macrumors 68020


    Jan 22, 2009
    Very refreshing to hear. Especially Craig's last statement.
  11. macrumors 6502

    Jan 18, 2012
    They'll end up backtracking on the whole convergence thing, for sure.
  12. Guest

    Sky Blue

    Jan 8, 2005
  13. macrumors 65816

    Oct 9, 2012
  14. macrumors 68030


    Nov 23, 2011
    I never really understood the people who claimed that OS X was getting 'iOSified' anyway. The Launchpad is incredibly useful; not only is it the quickest way to access all your applications, but it just displays the application within folders.

    To anybody who uses loads of third-party music plugins, or even Adobe software as a good example, you'll see they're buried in folders in the Applications folder.

    Thank goodness they confirmed it though, it's always a fear that they'll take unified experiences to an extreme. :apple:
  15. macrumors G5


    Nov 14, 2011
    And yet tech sites will keep reporting rumors that Apple is making a convertible device.
  16. macrumors 6502a


    Sep 27, 2011
    Michigan, US
    I like the pic, Plastic to Aluminum, nice transition :D
  17. macrumors 6502a

    Aug 3, 2010
    Good to hear. I think the decision was even easier to make when they saw what went down with Windows 8 among consumer opinions. Or maybe they were just smart enough to not go there in the first place, realizing what would happen. I sure don't know why Microsoft even went there. It's so easy to see how a tablet interface has a lot of metaphors which don't make sense on a desktop or laptop computer, and vice versa. They are different devices. It boggles my mind how little you need to know about HCI to follow that path through all the way to a release.
  18. macrumors G3


    Aug 24, 2009
    Well I guess that confirms the opinion of Windows 8 for Apple fans.

    Well screw em. I like Windows 8. :p
  19. macrumors regular

    Oct 27, 2011
    Surprisingly short article from an interview with three people. Compare it to the Bloomberg interview with Ive, Federighi and Cook.
  20. macrumors 68030


    Apr 13, 2010
    Bedfordshire, UK
    2015 ;)
  21. macrumors 6502a

    Nov 20, 2010
    After having tried a Windows 8 tablet (yuk), I'm very happy to hear this. OSX and iOS should stay seperate, anything else would greatly diminish both the iPad and the iMac/MacBook.
  22. macrumors 68020


    Apr 21, 2010
    Non-goal until someone do it with Android or Windows Phone. Then it will be a goal. IF it was technically viable having a tablet capable of doing laptop-class processing, of course I'd want it!

    Why I would want two devices occupying my briefcase if I can have only one? Of course an iPad-sized Macbook Air would be a nice thing to have! If it was as capable as a Retina Macbook, even better.

    Convergence is the way to go. Of course it's not interesting for companies narrowing a product line into a single one, but for consumers of course it's a good thing.
  23. macrumors regular

    May 8, 2011
    I for one think that at least design wise they could speak the same, not just different accents of the same language.

    How about a nice black menubar to start things off?

    Oh, and, just cause Windows 8 failed to converge mobile and desktop the right way doesn't mean Apple couldn't do it. And it wouldn't take away from the other, unless it was made that way.
    I'd like to see this 'convergence' being functional, like making it feel you're not connecting a device to your mac, but you have two devices that can talk to each other effortlessly. MILES to go.
  24. macrumors 601


    Jun 27, 2007
    Central U.S.
    That is some really great insight from the guys at the top. Each design decision should have a meaningful reason behind it. Though I'd still love to see that patent come to life—the one of the iMac that you put your hands on the side, it detects your heartbeat to determine you're a human pulling down on purpose, and as you pull down it lowers the angle of the screen and transforms into an iOS-like interface.

    I would love to buy a 30th anniversary Mac, even if it's pricey. Something like a maxed out retina iMac in space gray or black.
  25. macrumors regular

    May 17, 2006
    I don't care about merging the software, but I'd really like to merge the hardware. It's crazy to have an iPad Air and a MacBook Air instead of just one device with a removable top, but as they say, right now those are two devices with very different utilities. I need the iPad for the touch screen and iOS goodies, and the Air for my serious work and writing. I can of course buy a shell and keyboard for the Air, but that doesn't allow me to interact with all the OSX software I need. But I guess there's no incentive for Apple to unify these similar devices as long as they can keep us buying both. It would just be so much nicer to have an Air that functions as a MacBook Air with a removable iPad top, which runs both OSX apps and iOS apps as appropriate. I don't need some miraculous software convergence, just one device that runs both.

Share This Page