Apple Expected to Adopt 802.11ac 5G Gigabit Wi-Fi This Year

Discussion in ' News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jan 22, 2012.

  1. macrumors bot


    Apr 12, 2001


    AppleInsider claims that Apple is planning on incorporating support for the new faster 802.11ac Wi-Fi specification into products this year.
    This "Gigabit WiFi" offers speeds 3 times as fast as existing 802.11n wireless networks can with speeds of over 1 Gigabit per second.

    Despite the specification not being finalized, Broadcom has already announced a family of chips supporting 802.11ac Wi-Fi. The final specification is expected to be certified in the second half of this year.

    Apple and other manufacturers have been known to deploy un-finalized wireless technology in the past. Apple deployed 802.11n in new AirPort base stations years before the official standard certification.

    Article Link: Apple Expected to Adopt 802.11ac 5G Gigabit Wi-Fi This Year
  2. macrumors 6502a

    Jun 26, 2003
    Perfect! Can't wait -- My TC broke 4 months ago!
  3. macrumors 65816


    Nov 15, 2010
    Edinburgh, UK
    How will this work in congested wifi signal areas?

    It is bad enough maintaining a clean signal when my neighbours use 40MHz, let alone 80 to 160MHz
  4. macrumors 6502

    Feb 24, 2011
    How bad does it kill the range when 2.4 ghz is removed?
  5. macrumors 68000


    Jun 1, 2011
    Planet earth.
    If this means faster transfer speeds to an external hard drive connected to an Airport Extreme via USB port, I'll easily make the purchase.

    I have 1.3TB of data on my shared drive, and on a weekly basis about 20-40gb of data is transferred to the drive. Watching files copy at 5-10mb/s is pretty sad.
  6. macrumors 6502

    Mar 9, 2007

    Waiting for 10Gbs ethernet myself.

    1Gbs ethernet is getting a little slow for moving media over a LAN.
  7. macrumors 601


    Jun 27, 2007
    Central U.S.
    Will this standard support the bandwidth capable of wireless video mirroring of a hypothetical retina iPad 3 using a hypothetical Apple TV 3?

    Another thing—is it too much to ask that the numbering system for these “standards” go “a, b, c, d, e…” instead of “a, b, g, n, ac”? Because in 15 years we’ll end up with something stupid like 802.11no.

    I know people like my grandma will ask “is n newer than ac?”

    And another thing—I wish USB updated this often. Make everything backwards compatible like it is now but just update the speed every few years instead of waiting. Then most computers today would have at least a fairly speedy USB port compared to 2.0.
  8. macrumors 68040


    Jun 16, 2007
    It's effectively 90MB/sec with overhead. That's slow for you?

    Unless you're using GbE for pro use, then that's another issue. Fiber is good for that kind of stuff.
  9. macrumors regular

    Jun 29, 2010
    Sydney, Australia
    Bring it on Apple! This will definitely lead to better airplay streaming of movies, and hopefully Mac -> ATV 1080p streaming!
  10. macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

    Oct 9, 2006
    Well considering that 5-10 mb/s is going to be around 0.5-1 gigabit/ s speeds the answer is no because you are bumping against the max speed of the network that having on 20% overhead is being nice as local laws and wifi tend to not care about having extra overhead as they have space to burn.
  11. macrumors G5


    Jul 29, 2011
    Somewhere Back In The Long Ago
    In actual fact. the 5GHZ band takes you AWAY from congestion. The 2.4 band is where the interference is at present. My TC operating at 5GHZ and 2.4 (it auto switches) gives a far better connection on my IOS devices than the older standard ever could.
  12. macrumors 601


    Mar 18, 2008
    California, United States
    Exactly what I was thinking. This should open the door for 1080p content in iTunes content too.
  13. macrumors 68000

    May 6, 2004
    Logical speculation, no sources though. Hopefully it will be included in Ivy Bridge 2012 Mac Upgrades as well as a 2012 base station upgrades at the same time.
  14. macrumors 6502a

    May 17, 2011
    I hope that the speed can be promoted up to 10 Gb/s very soon. Then, a computer display, such as an Apple Thunderbolt Display with WIFI capability, can be connected to a desktop computer, such as a Mac Pro or a Mac mini, through WIFI, which will be the beginning of a new computing era.
  15. Quu
    macrumors 68000


    Apr 2, 2007
    Any wireless improvement is good to me. The 130Mb/ps I get on 2.4GHz N isn't really fast enough for me. I hate accessing large files or doing time machine backups to my server over WiFi. Time Machine alone goes 5-6x faster over 1Gb ethernet from my Desktop -> Server as my Notebook -> Server (WiFi).
  16. macrumors 6502a

    Feb 18, 2010
    Terra Australis
    This sounds good, but without a ratified standard this means possible issues later on, where a simple firmware upgrade may not suffice, especially if newer Broadcom chips are released (newer revisions) this means that multiple versions will be available without the consumers knowledge.

    Remember 802.11n took over 7 years to be ratified, and never heard the end of companies releasing "draft" hardware for this standard, and compatibility issues later arising due to different chip revisions inside different brands of hardware.

    As usual the trick of this is to hold back till 802.11ac is fully ratified.
  17. macrumors 6502a

    Nov 24, 2005
    Cook me up, Scotty.

  18. macrumors 65832


    Jan 1, 2008
    On The Nickel, over there....
  19. sammich, Jan 23, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2012

    macrumors 601


    Sep 26, 2006
    The 802.11 standards set implements wireless technologies in a set of frequencies. Each of the letters you see after '802.11' count up alphabetically from the first incarnation of the standard. 'a' and 'b' you're familiar with, 'c' to 'f' and 'h' to 'k' cover other standards that the 802.11 group have created to work with wireless LANs.

    802.11i is the standard that deals with security, most notably WPA2 and WPS. So when they decide to create a new speed of WLAN, other letters have been used to represent those other standards.

    All that said, yes, they could easily have a 'consumerised' naming system like USB has (High-Speed and SuperSpeed). But with 5 'speeds' of wireless, even this system could be a bit overwhelming. Just understand that, the bigger the value in alphabet-base counting, the faster...
  20. macrumors 6502a

    Jul 21, 2011
    Well....since I am waiting for it.....heres to hoping this makes it into the iPad 3 hee hee hee. :p
  21. macrumors Pentium


    Jan 28, 2009
    Quebec, Canada
    Welcome to last year :

    WiDi does just this, it's Intel's implementation of the WirelessHD protocol (60 Ghz or if you will, IEEE what 802.11ad will define under the umbrella of WiGig, a competitor of WirelessHD).

    On-topic : It will be nice to get a bump up from 802.11n, but frankly wireless is abysmal regardless and reaching the theoritcal top speeds is never easy, even standing next to the base stations. I do get a giggle in these threads when the uninitiated though think we can't really do stuff like stream "1080p full HD" without these advances. 1080p streams just fun already over 802.11n, it's not a matter of pixels but of compression and bitrates.


    Just to further drive the point home :

    Notice how 802.11ac isn't due for ratification until December 2012. So if Apple offers it before that, we'll be getting a "draft" implementation like we did with the original 802.11n.
  22. macrumors 6502a

    Jul 25, 2002
  23. macrumors Pentium


    Jan 28, 2009
    Quebec, Canada
    Why would that have anything to do with computer/device local networking ?

  24. macrumors 6502a


    Nov 9, 2010
    10 Gigabit Ethernet is where my money will be. I spent enough getting N900 routers to get any significant benefits of transfer speeds. I can currently transfer 80-90 read and 40-50 write from NAS over Gigabit LAN. I am hungry for speed.
  25. macrumors 6502a

    Jul 25, 2002
    Because I want my wireless local network to be available on my entire property... 20 acres.

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