Apple iBook keyboard and H2O prob.

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by we87110, Jun 16, 2006.

  1. we87110 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2006
    #1



    16 June 2006;


    I have a ibook g4 1.3 Ghz, and was cleaning keyboard with water; soaking it good!

    Let it dry and all keys returned operational - exception of the 'space' and 'n' keys; which are not working for some reason.

    Soaking twice harmed it none at all; once more - but the problem with two keys remains.

    Spending money for this is not good - a knowledgeable person have any advice as to options other than shelling out money?

    Wayne Eligur
     
  2. patrick0brien macrumors 68040

    patrick0brien

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2002
    Location:
    The West Loop
  3. we87110 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2006
    #3
    H20 Issue



    YES 48 HRS for each cleaning.

    Do not buy a new mac something evil over at Apple - OKAY?
     
  4. patrick0brien macrumors 68040

    patrick0brien

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2002
    Location:
    The West Loop
    #4
    -we87110

    Are you placing the blame at Apple's feet for soaking the keyboard and having a funky result? I sure hope not.

    First off, you really shouldn't use water - it's mentioned in the instuctions with the computer. Best way I've fount to clean is Windex (with ammonia) on a terrycloth rag. And definitely don't spray anything liquid on the computer, do it on the rag. I know I'm making a huge assumption that liquid water was used directly on the keyboard because of the symptoms you are experiencig.

    That being said, it doesn't solve the issue you currently have. I'd say remove the keyboard (watch that ribbon cable) and set it vertically, look for drips. I think what is happeneing is that you have a bit of water remaining under the underkey substrate. It's designed to protect against water splashes, but it holds onto water that gets past it. Use toothpicks (plastic if you can) to lift any plastics you think have water in them and use a fan to blow air over the toothpicked assembly.

    Wait another 48 hours.

    I hope that works for you.

    Don't use water again...
     
  5. we87110 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2006
    #5
    H20 Much appreciate your answer >

    Yes you made correct guess at the situation - careless of me - no?

    Do you say I can get functionality out of this yet?

    Appreciate the help!

    Wayne Eligur
     
  6. jtown macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    #6
    I think that might be your problem. Where on earth did you get the idea that it was a good idea to "soak" a piece of electronic equipment that wasn't designed to be used under water? Amazing.

    Do you see those rounded plastic "bubbles" under the keys? You probably got water under those. It's not going to dry because water can't evaporate through that material. It doesn't matter how long you let it sit. It won't dry out any faster than a sealed bottle of water would evaporate. You need to get the water out of there and DON'T SOAK YOUR KEYBOARD IN WATER AGAIN!!!

    If you've completely destroyed your keyboard, you can buy a replacement on ebay for about $20 if you are patient and wait for a good price.
     
  7. patrick0brien macrumors 68040

    patrick0brien

    Joined:
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    The West Loop
    #7
    -jtown

    That's not necessary. The man is hurting enough, and the points have been made.
     
  8. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

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    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #8
    D.I. (de ionized) water is always best to use, if your going to use water. If you cant get D.I. water then distilled is always best to use on electronic equipment.

    If you do the same process with 91%(or better) isopropyl alcohol, you might do ok. Anhydrous alcohol will remove residual moisture and wick it away. Many metallic oxides also dissolve in isopropyl alcohol (like rust), so that should help with any shorts.

    If you had soaked the keyboard in D.I. water, nothing much should have happened. I am guessing that some mineral buildup or perhaps a short caused by some sort of oxide has occurred.

    Cleaning a keyboard or electronics with D.I. water and alcohol isn't that odd. It’s a tried and true method for fixing electronics accidently soaked in liquids- like soda.

    If you are so inclined, get 2 pans just big enough to fit the keyboard. Fill it with some DI water. Don't let it sit in the water, rather rock the keyboard back and forth. Then let it drip, dry off what water you can. Then repeat with the 91% or better alcohol. Use a squirt bottle to specifically hit the trouble keys. Get as much isopropanol off as you can and let it dry upside down.

    This can remove the silicon based lubricant that is used on some apple keys. I don't know the specifics about your keyboard. Other wise, get a used keyboard at iFixIt.com.

    I don't recommended this as a regular way of cleaning equipment. I work with hundreds of volunteers and have to fix a lot of equipment that has had things spilled on it. It is generally used as a last ditch effort to resurrect equipment. It has never caused me problems... let me correct myself. I had a reel-to-reel recorder motor burst into flames after some bugs crawled into it. The motor control board overheated and smoked, and somebody decided to cover it with coffee. (Quick thinking that wasn't so bad.) The coffee and smoke combined to form a gunk on the board. The alcohol removed the protective covering on the board it's self, which was some sort of alcohol soluble varnish.

    In short, soaking a keyboard in water or in the dishwasher (A previous thread on this site-what are you people thinking) is possible, but shouldn't be SOP. Things may happen.
     
  9. redeye be macrumors 65816

    redeye be

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    BXL
    #9
    Thanks Eniregnat, nice to know.

    This made me think about what it would be for the MacBooks to have liquid spilled over their keyboard.
     

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