Apple or not?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips, Advice and Discussion (archive)' started by TrickyUK, Jan 24, 2005.

  1. TrickyUK macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #1
    Hi there!

    This is my first post on here so bear with me if I'm asking questions that have been answered elsewhere. Basically I've decided to switch from PC to Powerbook, for all the usual reasons, and I've decided to go for one of the updated Powerbooks if they ever arrive (I'm in no particular rush yet so I can wait). However, I've got a few questions that I need some help with, and which need answering really before I make my purchase.


    OK here goes.

    1. I'm going to be in the Middle East from this summer onwards for around a year. I fully intend to purchase the Apple Cover if I buy a Powerbook, but can anyone shed any light on the ease/difficulty of actually getting repairs taken care of in say Egypt/Jordan/Syria without having to go to Israel? (nothing against Israel personally, it's probably the best option for repairs but also leaves an awkward stamp in your passport!)

    I guess what I'm trying to avoid is shelling out a load of cash for a Powerbook and Apple Care, only to discover that getting Apple repairs is next to impossible. A little hassle out there is unavoidable.



    2. Are there any external Arabic keyboards available for Powerbooks? Is it feasible to connect them to powerbooks if they exist? This isn't that essential to be honest but would be nice to have.


    I'm sure I had some more questions but if anyone can shed light on either of these I'd appreciate it

    Cheers

    Tricky
     
  2. killuminati macrumors 68020

    killuminati

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
    #2
    :mad:

    I dont think so
     
  3. mpw Guest

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    #3
    Care to elaborate on why you don't think Israel's the best bet for repairs?
     
  4. killuminati macrumors 68020

    killuminati

    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2004
  5. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #5
    Why mad? It is awkward, when traveling in other Middle East countries, to have such a stamp. That doesn't mean he's anti-Israel. Just that he doesn't want to invite trouble.

    Anyway, from what I've heard, AppleCare applies internationally to laptops, although you're stuck with what local services you can find. Others can chip in with their experiences, but that's what I've read. I've had no personal experience with it. I would hope that Apple could answer that question when you buy your system.

    I know that there are Turkish keyboards, but I don't know of Arabic ones. However, I'd assume - again, emphasis on assume - that you could use a USB Arabic keyboard and the International preferences to select an Arabic language.
     
  6. mpw Guest

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2004
    #6
    Superfluous so.
     
  7. TrickyUK thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #7
    Sorry...you lost me a little with that reply.

    An Israeli stamp in a passport can prevent access to certain countries in the Middle East, that's all I meant by that. For example, if I intend to go to Syria then they'd refuse me entry, even if my Israeli passport stamp was on a separate piece of paper, as the exit stamp from the country I entered from would be evidence enough.

    Going off previous visits to Israel, i'd have a far better/easier chance of getting a PC or a powerbook fixed there, and would happily do so if it did not void my passport in the eyes of certain Middle Eastern countries. I stated this in my question purely as a practicality about getting a computer repaired in the Middle East, and I intended no other meaning.

    Apologies if this was unclear, and if I have offended you.


    Tricky
     
  8. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2004
    Location:
    Andover, MA
    #8
    Um, can we get back on topic? Please? Let's not bicker....
     
  9. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #9
    Syria? Don't think so.

    Found this on the Apple website:

    PROHIBITED DESTINATIONS
    The U.S. holds complete embargoes against Cuba, Iran, Sudan, and Syria.
    The exportation, reexportation, sale or supply, directly or indirectly, from the United States, or by a U.S. person wherever located, of any Apple goods, software, technology (including technical data), or services to any of these countries is strictly prohibited without prior authorization by the U.S. Government.


    On a side note, you'll also be pleased to note that: It's prohibited to allow certain countries to use Apple products in the design, development, production or use of nuclear, missiles, and chemical and biological weapons and technology without proper authorization from the U.S. Government.


    Lebanon dealers:
    http://www.appleme.co.ae/ABMSite/abm/pages/lebanon.html


    Arabic on the Mac FAQ
     
  10. TrickyUK thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #10
    Thanks JSW.


    I suspected that might be the case with the USB keyboard thing. I'm kind of hoping my old Arabic one might work, but it's not too disastrous if it doesn't.

    Yeah the answer might lie in contacting Apple directly, I'll be sure to ask them when I purchase if not before. If anyone has direct experience though i'd appreciate it.

    Tricky
     
  11. TrickyUK thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #11
    Fantastic link Blue Velvet.

    Thanks.

    N.B I meant getting a computer repaired in Israel is the easiest and most likely option, if the passport thing doesn't matter
     
  12. pubwvj macrumors 68000

    pubwvj

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2004
    Location:
    Mountains of Vermont
    #12
    I've had a lot of Macs (>30) and about half have been PowerBooks and iBooks of various sorts. I've never had one fail in a way I couldn't fix (e.g., bad memory, HD, etc). Unfortunately I had AppleCare :) on a lot of them (it costs $$$). In retrospect I wouldn't buy the AppleCare but that is my personal comfort level and calculation. In the last five years or so I've skipped the AppleCare. The machines still aren't failing so it wasn't the purchase of AppleCare that prevented failure! :) They're just very reliable machines. This is not to say there are no failures out there or even no bad apples in the barrel. There have been some dramatic recalls which I'm glad I was not part of (iBook white hinge & video, batteries, etc).

    So where am I going with this... If you're going to be in an area that you don't think you'll be able to get rapid repairs, say a third-world area like Vermont, then the Powerbooks are excellent machines to have along. They are very reliable. Even better is to feel comfortable doing diagnostics and repair on the hardware yourself but that might not be enough and not everyone likes to perform their own brain surgery.

    If you want maximum reliability then what I would suggest is buying two machines. Load one of them up to the max with hard drive capacity, memory, etc. Have the other be a bare minimum but of the same machine. Now if one fails you can switch over to the other. Periodically backup between the two - Airport is handy for this although there are faster ways if you want to get into it. Ideally atleast know how to transfer the RAM and HD between machines.

    That will give you maximum reliability and for not a heck of a lot more than the price of AppleCare. Is this extra worth it to you? Well that depends on the value of your time and how critical the computer is to your work. For the extra you also get backups of your data.

    Of course, you will carry them in separate luggage - right!?!

    -Walter
    in Vermont
    on a mountain
    a long ways from
    the nearest dealer
    and even further from
    a half decent dealer.
     
  13. TrickyUK thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2005
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #13
    Yeah to be honest I'm of a similar mindset to you, mainly due to the fact that I hate paying out extra for something extra that doesn't bring immediate benefits (such as extra RAM etc). I'd be a little timid pulling a powerbook to pieces in order to fix it, but I guess that's only down to lack of knowledge, and which might be preferable to taking it to an Egyptian PC shop where they may have less idea than I do.

    Two powerbooks would be ideal, but a bit pricey for me!

    Tricky
     

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