Apple Plans to Encrypt iCloud Email in Transit Between Providers

Discussion in 'Mac Blog Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jun 13, 2014.

  1. macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    #1
    [​IMG]


    NPR Yesterday wrote a story on the efforts of tech companies to protect consumer data, which included an extensive chart on how companies measure up when it comes to encryption.

    While Apple was found to be encrypting iMessage end-to-end, as well as email from customers to iCloud, it was found to be one of the few global email providers based in the U.S. that does not encrypt customer email in transit between providers. That means emails that are sent from iCloud to iCloud are encrypted, but emails sent from iCloud to other providers, such as Gmail, are not encrypted.

    Following the post, however, Apple told NPR that it is planning to encrypt those emails in the near future.
    As noted by 9to5Mac, Apple's response to NPR mentions only Me.com and Mac.com without a mention of the newer iCloud.com email addresses, but Google's data protection transparency website suggests that outbound iCloud.com emails are not encrypted, so it is likely Apple's plans include changes to the iCloud.com domain as well.

    [​IMG]
    As noted by NPR, end-to-end encryption of emails sent back and forth between service providers requires cooperation between providers. Both email services involved (such as Apple and Google or Apple and Yahoo) must implement encryption, which means Apple will need to work with other email providers for true end-to-end encryption of iCloud.com email.

    NPR's study also noted that many app installations and iOS updates are sent unencrypted to iPhones, as are configuration files sent from telecom companies, and pre-login browsing/shopping traffic from the Apple Store.

    Article Link: Apple Plans to Encrypt iCloud Email in Transit Between Providers
     
  2. macrumors 6502a

    CrazyForApple

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    #2
    thats good news
     
  3. macrumors 6502a

    chirpie

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    #3
    Kudos to NPR, that entire series was a good listen.
     
  4. PinkyMacGodess, Jun 13, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2014

    macrumors 68030

    PinkyMacGodess

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    #4
    Good grief! They don't already do that? :eek:

    Exposure is limited, but come on... I'd have expected they were already doing this!:mad:

    EDIT: Ohh, I thought this was about transit between their own servers. DUH, they had better be doing *something*...

    Now between Yahoo, Google, and 'all the rest', in an industry notorious for having 'standards' being more like 'guidelines' that are ignored, or 'augmented' for proprietary reasons, I can see this being a rather large undertaking. Larger than it should be...
     
  5. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    #5
    kudos... iCloud is pretty much my primary off-work email these days. Stopped using gmail a while back
     
  6. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
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    Vancouver, BC CANADA
    #6
    This article is quite misleading. There's two ways to protect emails in transit:

    Method #1 - Encrypt the pipe that the email message travels through. This is basically the whole SSL/TLS discussion that has been in the news lately.

    Method #2 - Encrypt the contents of the email message itself. This would allow the encrypted message to pass through non-encrypted pipes and still be safe. But this method is far more complicated, as it requires a certificate+handshake between the sending email client and the receiving email client.

    It sounds like Apple will be ensuring that when it connects to another mail server, it will try to use an encrypted pipe, if the other server supports that whereas right now, it doesn't make that effort. That would make sense. The messages themselves won't be magically encrypted as per Method #2. That's up to the end-user to implement.
     
  7. macrumors 65816

    furi0usbee

    Joined:
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    #7
    Yeah, it would be nice to have *real* encryption so even Apple cannot decrypt our messages and give them to the government.
     
  8. macrumors G4

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    Redondo Beach, California
    #8
    You can do that now. But both you and the person you are sending to have to agree and set it up in advance. Practically it would work between and and a few others.

    End to end encryption is not possible in general because you many times WANT someone you don't know to be able to read your mail.
     
  9. macrumors 6502

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    #9
    The NSA has complete access to information anyway, and can easily decrypt it no sweat.
     
  10. DryHeave, Jun 14, 2014
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2014

    macrumors newbie

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    #10
    Well that depends what method of encryption you're using. If you're using a one-time-pad xor method with truly random pad data, then unless an attacker has read-access to your one-time pad or you screw up and accidentally use the pad twice, nobody else is going to have even the remotest possible chance of decrypting it — no cryptologist, white hat, black hat, nor NSA, nor aliens, nor even the most advanced computer in the universe running for quadrillions of years, nor even God.

    Ok, maybe God. But that's about it. Maybe Q.
     
  11. macrumors 601

    Westside guy

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    #11
    Google only recently started doing this. Same thing with encryption of data between their own different server farms - twelve months ago they weren't encrypting that, either.

    Then Snowden/Greenwald released a talk slide from the NSA showing that tapping those messages between server farms was one of the ways they were intercepting (specifically) Google data. That slide was shown to a pair of Google engineers, who then reportedly responded "oh (expletive)".

    Google does deserve credit for moving on this quickly - but all of these companies have been playing catch-up. And really this only addresses spying by national entities. This almost certainly isn't how criminals get hold of people's mail.
     
  12. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    #12
    https://gpgtools.org/

    The cool thing about a one time pad is, there is a decryption key for every possible message of that length. If you have a message describing nuclear launch codes, with a different key, that same message could be a shopping list. It is even better if you pad the message, so you can't even use the length to give you a clue about the content.

    One cool trick, encrypt your message using the correct key, then generate a second key that decrypts a fake message. If you are compromised and forced to give up your key, give them the second one. :)

    ********

    Honestly, if a mail server is not using encryption with a real key from a real cert authority, the sending server needs to bounce the message.
     
  13. macrumors G4

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    #13
    That works only for special cases. How could I use GPG to send email to someone I don't know? The problem with encryption is that we want the reader to be able to read it. So you can only encrypt some email to some people.
     
  14. macrumors 601

    Westside guy

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    #14
    If a person has generated a GPG public/private keypair, they've probably uploaded their public key to one of the public key stores - and those usually sync between each other as well. so, generally speaking, you shouldn't need to know someone to send an encrypted email to them. If they've got a key, you can probably get it and use it.
     
  15. macrumors 68030

    PinkyMacGodess

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    #15
    ok

    ----------

    How screwed up is this country?

    Your own government tweaks your balls when you walk around with your pants down, rather than tell you to pull your pants up.

    Whatever happened to 'Better of dead than red'?
     
  16. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2013
    #16
    This is great news. Apple is always putting the security and privacy of its users at the top of its corporate goals. Now it's time for other companies to match Apple's pledge...
     
  17. macrumors 65816

    furi0usbee

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2008
    #17
    You had me until you started getting silly with the god stuff :)

    But point taken.

    ----------

    I won't go that far. If that's the case, there is zero point it trying to keep anything safe. However, do I assume my FileVault 2, 20 character password is safe from the NSA, probably not. I mean, they have billions of dollars of computer resources and if they are intent on cracking one single computer and it happens to be mine, I highly doubt there is anything I can do to protect myself.
     
  18. macrumors 65816

    556fmjoe

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2014
    #18
    If Apple is encrypting them with Apple's keys, this has no effect on the government because Apple can simply be ordered to hand them over, just like Lavabit was.

    Apple really needs to have customers generate their own keys locally and only pass encrypted data through Apple servers to address the NSL issue. If Apple doesn't hold the keys, they can't surrender them if served with an NSL.
     
  19. macrumors G3

    roadbloc

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    UK
    #19
    I'm glad Apple (and other tech giants like Microsoft and BlackBerry) are taking user privacy seriously with the NSA threat.
     
  20. macrumors 68000

    spazzcat

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    #20
    Email isn't encrypted now unless you are doing yourself with certs...
     
  21. macrumors 68030

    PinkyMacGodess

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    #21
    And what would stop Apple from doing that?
     
  22. macrumors member

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    Nov 28, 2006
    #22
    Actually, it is time that Apple catches up to all of the other providers that have already improved email security. According to the article and confirmed by my tests, the only major email providers in the US that don't provide this security are Verizon and Apple.

    See Google's research on this subject here
     
  23. macrumors member

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