Apple Releases Statement on Customer Privacy and Law Enforcement Requests for Customer Data

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by MacRumors, Jun 17, 2013.

  1. macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    In the wake of a public revelation of "PRISM", a top secret intelligence gathering program run by the U.S. National Security Agency in which Apple was reportedly among a number of companies providing the government with direct access to user data, Apple has now issued a "Commitment to Customer Privacy" statement addressing the issue.

    According to Apple, no agency has direct access to customer data, and each request for data by law enforcement is evaluated by Apple's legal team to determine the legitimacy of the claim.
    Apple goes on to note that there are certain categories of information that it does not provide to law enforcement, either because the company never stores it in the first place or is unable to decrypt it. Specifically, Apple notes that iMessage and FaceTime conversations are unable to be decrypted by Apple and that customer location data, Maps searches, and Siri requests are not stored by Apple in any form that could be tied to a specific user.

    Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the comment thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All MacRumors forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

    Article Link: Apple Releases Statement on Customer Privacy and Law Enforcement Requests for Customer Data
     
  2. macrumors 65816

    furi0usbee

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    #2
    Hey wait, what about my FileVault password that I let Apple store... in case I forget.. does the NSA get that? I guess I'm creating a new FileVault and not giving Apple access to "hold" it for me.

    Bryan
     
  3. macrumors 6502

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  4. macrumors 68030

    osofast240sx

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    #4
    It's the carriers that store your information not apple.
     
  5. macrumors 6502a

    arcite

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    #5
    And this is why I'll never use the cloud, nor FB, nor upload sensitive data that is unencrypted. Once it's on the 'net, anyone can get it.

    TRUST NO ONE!
     
  6. macrumors regular

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    #6
    By allowing Apple to store it, they have access to it and would be able to give it to Law Enforcement. As you stated, the solution is to disable it and then re-enable it and don't use the option to allow Apple to hold the key in case you lose it.

    ----------

    If Apple can't decrypt the information, the carriers can't either.
     
  7. Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #7
    Last week's podcast on TWiT.tv, Security Now, Steve Gibson detailed how the NSA is obtaining data and how companies themselves are not participating or cooperating with them outside of court orders and requests.

    Basically, they're tapping into the fiber optic feeds at the ISP level and splitting the light waves off (hence the term Prism) to their own routers and equipment. This is all done upstream of companies like Apple and Google. So the NSA is getting that data before it ever makes it's way to Apple, Google et al...

    Skip ahead to about 57:31 to get the technical details of this.

     
  8. macrumors 6502a

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  9. kot
    macrumors regular

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    #9
    AFAIK before the key is sent to Apple, it is encrypted with your "secret answers" so if you forget them, no Apple will be able to help you, all your data is lost.
     
  10. macrumors 65816

    CristobalHuet

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  11. macrumors regular

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    #11
    There is no one on earth with the computing power necessary to break the encryption Apple uses. The same encryption is in use by the military, banks, etc. They may be getting the data scrambled, but they can't decrypt it.
     
  12. macrumors 603

    troop231

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    SandboxGeneral

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    #13
    While that is true, PGP when used properly is virtually un-crackable, that doesn't stop the NSA from gathering the data and storing it.

    There is plenty of un-encrypted data flowing through ISP's that is being gathered and easily analyzed.
     
  14. macrumors 6502a

    DesertEagle

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    #14
    Will the Keychain be encrypted in iCloud? How about my iWork docs?
     
  15. macrumors 6502a

    arcite

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    #15
    Of course, the vast majority of people have nothing to hide, as they aren't doing anything particularity interesting, nor illegal. However Meta-data analysis is becoming increasingly powerful and useful in deriving useful information from the chaos.
     
  16. macrumors 6502

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    #16
    Interesting times we are living in. Zeitgeist comes to mind...
     
  17. macrumors 603

    whooleytoo

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    #17
    Unless they state how many requests they refused, it's a bit meaningless. If they received ~4,000 and only refused a handful, it doesn't mean much.

    I doubt if even Apple has the will or resources to scour through thousands of data access requests and give them any kind of meaningful review.
     
  18. macrumors 68030

    osofast240sx

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    #18
    Are u 100% sure?
     
  19. macrumors 68030

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    #19
    Lots of appropriate songs on it for that situation too:

    1. "Speak to Me"
    2. "Breathe"
    3. "On the Run"
    4. "Time"
    5. "The Great Gig in the Sky"
    Side 2
    1. "Money"
    2. "Us and Them"
    3. "Any Colour You Like"
    4. "Brain Damage"
    5. "Eclipse"
     
  20. macrumors G3

    charlituna

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    #20
    Paranoid much. They would only give it up under a verified warrant etc.

    You brewing meth or something to get law enforcement on your back? No, then they won't get a warrant for your information
     
  21. macrumors 68000

    iceterminal

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    #21
    What I noticed is that they say they have their "legal team" review each request. Which is nice. However, did anyone else notice they didn't even state one time they required a warrant for the information?

    Nope. They just said "we looked at it and said sure". No warrant needed for them to give up personal information. Regardless of the situation, Apple is saying they are the judge and jury.

    Scares the hell out of me.
     
  22. SandboxGeneral, Jun 17, 2013
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013

    Moderator

    SandboxGeneral

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    #22
    If the encryption is using PGP, then yes, one can be about as certain as gravity that it's protected. PGP has been pounded on for years by all the "experts," and it's never been broken. However, anything is possible and I'd say there is a 99.999999% certainty that it's safe.

     
  23. macrumors G3

    charlituna

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    #23
    Or his guess on how. Since they aren't likely to have released this detail to the public 'for security reasons'
     
  24. macrumors 65816

    notabadname

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    #24
    Most notable that no iMessage or FaceTime data is decrypted, and no location data, map data or SIRI requests can be tied to users. That satisfies my basic needs for privacy.
     
  25. macrumors G5

    gnasher729

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2005
    #25
    You didn't read anything, did you?

    But go ahead. Waste your time.

    Or maybe you could switch on your brain: Even with the FileVault key, how would Apple access data on your computer? FileVault only matters if your computer is turned on. And when your computer is turned on, _you_ enter the FileVault password, and the data on the drive is readable. For this to make any difference, the NSA would have to get your hard drive and then get the keys.

    Or maybe you could for a moment forget your paranoia. These keys don't store themselves, someone has to write code for it. And that person is a highly intelligent software developer, who with 99% certainty wouldn't just follow orders (maybe they would; I'm not American, so maybe American people are wimps without a backbone who just do as they are told, I hope they are not). It's the kind of thing that is hard to achieve and impossible to keep secret. And how exactly would doing this benefit Apple?
     

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