Apple Updates Java for Lion and Snow Leopard in Sync with Oracle

Discussion in 'MacRumors.com News Discussion' started by MacRumors, Jun 13, 2012.

  1. macrumors bot

    MacRumors

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    Apple yesterday released a pair of software updates for Java, issuing versions for both Lion and Snow Leopard. The update in part builds upon an earlier Java update for Lion that disabled automatic execution of Java applets in an attempt to minimize the impact of Java-based malware threats like Flashback.
    As noted by Krebs on Security, the release is notable because it came on the same day that Oracle released updates for Java on other platforms. Apple has long been criticized for lagging on Java updates, a policy which allowed the Flashback malware to flourish as Mac systems remained unprotected against the threat even though Oracle had patched the vulnerability on other systems several months before.
    With Java SE 7 set to come to the Mac later this year, control over updates is transitioning from Apple to the OpenJDK project, with both Apple and Oracle providing expertise to ensure that updates for Mac roll out on a timely basis. That transition was begun back in late 2010, with Steve Jobs noting at the time that having Apple responsible for Java updates on the Mac "may not be the best way to do it."

    Article Link: Apple Updates Java for Lion and Snow Leopard in Sync with Oracle
     
  2. macrumors regular

    ghostlines

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    #2
    I see your 'taking security more seriously' and raise u 'make OS X updates more stable'!
     
  3. macrumors 6502

    dokujaryu

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    #3
    Updating now. I use JDeveloper with Mac OS X which requires a symbolic link from classes.jar to the nonexistent on Mac rt.jar. The OpenJDK Mac OS X initiative is using the traditional jar names, so I hope this persists when Apple goes 7. (which it should since they are using OpenJDK)
     
  4. macrumors member

    Joined:
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    #4
    The JVM is a good platform for some kinds of software development (as long as you're not using Java lol) but its a good move to dump it from web browsers by default. I have not even seen a Java Applet in years - most people will never require this for common uses. In a corporate environment it might be necessary, but not for normal daily users.
     
  5. macrumors 601

    gotluck

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    #5
    some of the surf cams in my area use applets!
     
  6. macrumors 6502

    dokujaryu

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    #6
    Every IDE I use except X Code (Eclipse, NetBeans, JDeveloper) is written in Java for platform independence.

    I do a lot of server side work in Java EE. It's a pretty common technology behind the websites you use. A lot of in-house applications are written and maintained in Java in big companies as well. (it's sort of the "new" Visual Basic if you will. Some places still use .NET and VB.NET heavily tho)

    Personally I believe Java is getting better rather than worse. EE especially has come a long way since 1.4.2.
     
  7. macrumors 68030

    Winni

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    Germany.
    #7
    The video surveillance server at my company uses Java, too. And so does my old Photoshop Extended CS3, by the way. And eclipse, of course.
     
  8. Guest

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    Currently in Switzerland
  9. Guest

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    #9
    I wait feverishly every month for new Java updates.
     
  10. macrumors newbie

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    #10
    Instances of Flashback Virus?

    Hi. I was wondering how many of you actually had an instance of the Flashback virus on your Mac's? I understand the importance of taking action to prevent its occurrence. I have a number of Macs, and none of them were ever infected. Same for many friends' Macs. Curious how widespread the infestation really turned out to be, versus the potential that security firms were touting.
     
  11. macrumors 6502

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    #11
    I also didn't personally know anyone who got it.
     
  12. Guest

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    #12
    None here (or ever for that matter) - AND none for all my friends as well. Even after 10 years, there are still no viruses on OS X.
     
  13. macrumors demi-god

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    #13
    A tremendous amount of enterprise server-side development is Java-based. This means things like provisioning systems in telecom, billing systems, customer chat, preference management, identity management, etc behind a lot of the web sites you use will very likely have a strong Java presence, among many other things.

    So the answer is "Lots of people and companies".
     
  14. macrumors 65816

    Morod

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    #14
    Got the SL update yesterday. No problems at all here.
     
  15. macrumors 65816

    macsmurf

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    #15
    Given that Java is one of the most popular programming language in the world, at lot of developers (including me) care. It means I can use my mac at work.

    Also, due to a rather stupid decision on a national scale, Java is required for logging into banks in Denmark.
     
  16. macrumors 68020

    brdeveloper

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    #16
    Java developers mainly. "Facebook For Every Phone" app is in Java ME (mobile). A lot of corporate systems are Java SE and EE and sites are Java EE (server-side).

    Java SE was never broadly adopted for the common user, although an operating system that wants to support corporative software (usage and development) must run Java apps.
     
  17. macrumors 6502a

    klamse25

    Joined:
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    #17
    You're completely ignorant.
    Java is the most widely used cross-platform language today.

    PS: Ever heard of Minecraft? That game is based on Java.
    So millions of people are "who care about Java."
     
  18. macrumors member

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    #18
    The Java language is horrible for many purposes where you have a small team and want to get stuff done quickly, agreed. However, Java powers a lot of infrastructure around the world and is useful for many large services and will be important for a long time.

    Additionally, the JVM is a proven and great overall platform for software development. Look at Clojure, Scala, Groovy, JRuby, plenty of others. All of these run on the JVM and there's a lot of very interesting software development possible through this even if you never directly touch Java.
     
  19. juliazo, Jun 13, 2012
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2012

    macrumors newbie

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    #19
    Link directing to previous (2012-003) update, anyone else?

    Is anyone else redirected to the older version of the update when clicking on the Lion link? Trying to get the package separately to deploy over the network.

    Thanks!
     
  20. Guest

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    #20
    Interestingly, it seems like I am not part of "lots of people" - Java has been deactivated on my Safari for months now, and I haven't even noticed it. :rolleyes:

    ----------

    Minecraft is available for iOS and does NOT require Java on the client side...not that I will ever play that POS, of course.

    Again, my point was: From an end user's perspective, Java is close to irrelevant nowadays. I don't care if it is still widely used in the back office (programming languages and habits can always change anyway).
     
  21. macrumors 6502

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    London, United Kingdom
    #21
    Last I heard Apple still uses WebObjects as its web application server technology to power both the Apple Online Store and the iTunes Store.

    Want to take a bet at what WebObjects is written in? That's right; Java.
     
  22. macrumors 6502a

    iDuel

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    #22
    That isn't the point. The fact of the matter is that many consumers use Java for playing Java-based browser games. (i.e. Minecraft for PC & Mac which does require Java to be played in the web browser) I could also name off a few more browser-based Java games which are played by millions of users.
     
  23. macrumors demi-god

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    #23
    Not really sure what your particular point is commenting in this thread if it has no relevance to you, though hey, your time is your own. I'm also not sure whether anyone cares, really, if you use it on your Mac or if you've shut down access, or whatever (but maybe that's just me :)) but to call it irrelevant is to perhaps not see the bigger picture. It's out there running a lot of stuff you interact with on a daily basis, as mentioned previously.
     
  24. macrumors newbie

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    May 22, 2012
    #24
    Apple won't "go 7". It's Oracle who will go 7 on OS X. Apple has nothing to do with Java 7 themselves, their support ends with version 6.
     
  25. macrumors 6502

    dokujaryu

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    Irvine, California
    #25
    Well, we'll see. I wouldn't be surprised if Software Update and Mac OS X's JVM selector is still in play, even after the OpenJDK becomes the source. Honestly I hope this is the case because the alternative is multiple update mechanisms like on Windows, which blows.
     

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