Are we component-only HDTV owners left out of the new Mini craze?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by mahashel, Feb 28, 2006.

  1. mahashel macrumors 6502

    mahashel

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    #1
    Whether you love or hate the latest Mini announcement (I'm admittedly disappointed in the lack of a video card option), I see the value of attaching the thing to a TV.
    The integrated video is great for those of us who want a tiny & SILENT way to play audio/video in the living room.

    However, reading the specs on the new Mini announced today, I find that I'm left in the same lurch as I typically am when I attempt to attach a computer to my television. Manufacturer to users: it's either DVI, or take a hike.
    The issue here is the absence of a *real* (ie: not some expensive vaporware 3rd-party doohickey on a mystery webpage requesting credit card numbers) end-to-end connectivity solution for high-definition component-only televisions. I own two HDTV's that lack DVI input, and I'm not even close to considering replacing them for a long while. (no, I'm not interested in digital TV, so U.S. congress can stuff their ridiculous deadline)
    Does anyone know if Apple plans to address this? I'm seriously hoping I've simply overlooked some adapter in a dusty corner of their website.
    Of all the manufacturers that I've seen jump into the "hook this up to your TV" game, I was hoping Apple would think to cover more than one angle.
     
  2. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

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    #2
    You can get DVI-to-component converters... I don't see why this is such a big deal. The only real conversion issue a lot of people are going to REALLY have is HDCP video (from Blu-Ray or HD DVD) connecting to TVs that lack HDMI or HDCP DVI connectors.
     
  3. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #3
    To be fair, this is certainly not your fault. You got screwed. But those manufacturers jumped the gun and started shipping units without the right connectors. Especially with HDCP, there is tremendous industry pressure to move HDTVs to things like DVI, sadly...
     
  4. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

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    #4
    Well, don't jump on the TV makers too hard. Component video has been a standard for a VERY long time. It's only been in the past couple of years that new formats like DVI and HDMI have emerged, and these are being pushed hard by the content owners because of their ability to include copy-protection.
     
  5. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #5
    This is certainly true too...lots of squeeze plays. And customers suffer. Even between the DVI standards, customers are going to get hurt. For instance all the DVI devices that don't support HDCP.
     
  6. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

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    #6
    Or those of us with über-expensive home theatre setups that CANNOT be upgraded to use DVI or HDMI. Normally, I would have preordered my high-definition DVD player by now (either HD DVD or Blu-Ray), but the fact is that I don't even know if I'll be able to play HD discs on my system because of the lack of DVI/HDMI/HDCP support. Component video has served me well so far and it can even handle 1080p playback; but HDCP is going to be a pain-in-the-ass for me.
     
  7. mkrishnan Moderator emeritus

    mkrishnan

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    #7
    Maybe you should sell it to me. I still enjoy your iTrip! :p

    I personally see HDCP going bad places... That's just me. But I don't like this development at all. DVI was fine until HDCP came into the picture.
     
  8. clayj macrumors 604

    clayj

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    #8
    Well, it's gonna be $22,000 for the TV, and $3,500 for the AV receiver. :p

    I'm hoping that someone comes out with a DVI/HDMI/HDCP-to-component converter box that handles the HDCP decryption... there are too many of us with expensive plasma TVs that can't handle HDCP to be ignored.

    Anyway, back on topic: You can get a converter that'll allow you to connect your Mac mini to a component TV. Click here for some options.
     
  9. mahashel thread starter macrumors 6502

    mahashel

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    #9
    There are converters for everything, true. A quick Googling turns up several options. This is a great site for those of us with this issue: https://www.digitalconnection.com/store/Product_List.asp?CID=3&CAT=VIDEO%20CONVERTER
    My gripe (and that's all it really is, I suppose) is that the excitement of running out to buy a Mini will turn into a nightmare when Joe Switcher can't figure out how to hook the 3-color cables coming out of his Best Buy "HDTV" into his spiffy new Apple computer (DVI-only). Transcoders to accomplish this start around $100. However, tell that to someone looking to "hook a Mini to their TV" as simply as Steve implied. They're not going to be happy folk. ;)
    These non-DVI HD sets aren't exactly limited-run prototypes, either. There are an enormous number of these things out there, and I really wish *someone* would realize they need to include us in their HD plans, if only for another couple years before the leap to full HD broadcasting drives them out of circulation.
    To keep perspective, I totally agree with Clayj about HDCP. That's going to be HUGE, considering it seems to be the mandatory future and no video cards on the mainstream market today (even cutting edge GPUs) support HDCP. :eek:
     
  10. Arnaud macrumors 6502

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    #10
    They don't want to. This way, you'll be forced to change your system even sooner, i.e. more money for them. What is the average life of an electronic gizmo nowadays, 3 years? As much as the warranty, more or less? 20 years ago, you'd buy something (TV, washing-machine...) for life - but that meant little profit for the manufacturers -. Nowadays, you can be sure a circuit will be toasted after 5 years, and it will be more expensive to repair than to buy another one (unless you own a $22,000 TV set...).
     
  11. robbieduncan Moderator emeritus

    robbieduncan

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    #11
    This is not going to happen (at least not from a reputable source). Part of the HDCP license that a manufacturer needs to sign up to to produce HDCP parts is that they cannot output hi-def in an unencrypted format. So HDCP->Component is a big no-no.
     

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