As if using Windows is not bad enough....

Discussion in 'Community' started by dobbin, Dec 1, 2004.

  1. dobbin macrumors 6502a

    dobbin

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2002
    Location:
    England
    #1
    Its bad enough using Windows on a Dell all day long, but now my IT dept is going to stop me having pictures of my holidays and family on my screensaver, or having any control over how this stupid machine works. It's supposed to reduce calls to the helpdesk, but I will make a point of calling them to say my screensaver won't work, I can't change the screen resolution, etc, etc and how stupid it is. I hate being treated like an idiot just because some people are too stupid to set up their own screensaver and password.
    I don't know why I'm posting this, I just want some sympathy I guess!

    I wish I could use my Mac at work.......


     
  2. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #2
    Watch out for the nylon uniforms they'll probably introduce to foster the "consistency of style throughout the organization." :p
     
  3. Mechcozmo macrumors 603

    Mechcozmo

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2004
    #3
    "Please wipe your hard drive so that everyone's is the same. Make sure to zero it, too, so that it may always remind you of the management."
     
  4. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #4
    And then the company song and calisthenics by your desk...
     
  5. dobbin thread starter macrumors 6502a

    dobbin

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2002
    Location:
    England
    #5
    HA!
    You're joking, but I virtually have to do that! Another part of "Project Morpheus" means that I will no longer be allowed to store anything on the hard drive of my PC, and will have only 100Mb on the server to use. So where am I going to put all my photos and video clips that I download while the boss is not looking ;-)

    Can they actually technically stop me saving things to the hard disk (C: drive)? That seems unlikely to me, but I guess anything might be possible in the world of BIG BROTHER.
     
  6. Veldek macrumors 68000

    Veldek

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2003
    Location:
    Germany
    #6
    We have exactly this status here at work. I can’t access display preferences and can’t save on the harddisk. So it seems technically possible.
     
  7. iGav macrumors G3

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2002
    #7
    :rolleyes:

    I'd get a new job mate... ;)
     
  8. broken_keyboard macrumors 65816

    broken_keyboard

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2004
    Location:
    Secret Moon base
    #8
    We have a corporate screensaver and an audit program so IT dept. can tell what we install. Maybe they can view our screens remotely but I don't think so.

    Remember that as long you have physical access to the machine there's no a lot they can do to prevent you getting full access. With a few hours research on the Internet and a few more hours running a brute force password crack at home I was able to get the administrator password for my work computer. Anyone could do it.
     
  9. Baron58 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2004
    #10

    Ok, everyone, get a grip.

    Yes, they can do that. It's THEIR computer NOT YOURS. It's actually a really good idea for them to do that. The 100MB quota is a bit strange though - is that 'personal' space, aside from where you're supposed to store the actual work that you're being paid to do? If so, that's generous.

    BIG BROTHER would be people telling you what to do with *your* computer at *your* home that *you* paid for with *your* money. If you were assigned a company car to drive on client visits, it would be inappropriate for you to take a road trip, pick up a bunch of friends, go bar-hopping, pick up construction materials at Home Depot, etc. It's assigned to you for one purpose, for the benefit of your employer, and that's it. Just because you "know computers" doesn't mean that it's within your rights to do anything but work on the company equipment.

    I have a 'minimal personal use' policy at work. It means that I/we don't care if you order stuff from Gap or Amazon on your lunch break, or if you want to print out your thesis on a laser printer. However, if you consistantly do things like overflow the toilet, torch the microwave or break chairs, you may find that you don't last long as an employee. The same goes for computers - you dork it up, cause work delays, spend too much time surfing friendster.com or doing personal email, we have no tolerance for that.
     
  10. StarbucksSam macrumors 65816

    StarbucksSam

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2004
    Location:
    Washington, D.C.
    #11
    Tell Big Brother I said hello. Unbeliveable. Why do they treat you people like laboratory RATS? What a load of bullocks.
     
  11. AmigoMac macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2003
    Location:
    l'Allemagne
  12. makisushi macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2004
    Location:
    Northern VA
    #13
    I agree with Baron58.

    Obivously there was a problem large enough for them to devise and implement a solution.

    Its their equipment, their internet connection and they pay your salary.
    I say, if you don't like it, find a new job.
     
  13. dobbin thread starter macrumors 6502a

    dobbin

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2002
    Location:
    England
    #14
    Interesting replies guys.

    I can see both sides of the argument, and I agree that of course they can do whatever they like on their computers if they want to. I also agree that if I really don't like it then I can find a new job. Its not anywhere near as bad as that though, of course I'm not going to look for a new job. Its still annoying though, and organisations shouldn't do things that annoy their employees, the org will lose out in the long run.

    Working for an organisation should involve both sides giving and taking in my opinion. I do a lot for my organisation that is outside what I am contracted to do. Likewise they cut me some slack if I need to leave 10 minutes early for something. Sometimes I work a few minutes or hours later than I have to. This weekend I am working on a special project that means I will give up Friday evening, Saturday morning and all day Sunday (I will only receive 1 days leave and no extra money for about two extra days work). I don't mind doing this because I enjoy my job, and I am happy to do what it takes to get the job done. It annoys me that the thanks I get for my commitment is that I am no longer allowed to have my holiday pictures on my screensaver that my colleagues and I like to look at. I'm also not allowed to store anything on the 20Gb hard-drive which will be 80% empty. Its dumb.

    I think its the company who will lose in the long run. For example, next time I get an informal call from my boss on a Sunday asking for advice on something I will only be able to say, "I'm sorry I can't help you, I no longer have any of my work on my laptop... its all on the server". They will have to go down the official route of calling the out of hours emergency line, which may or may not be able to help them.

    Incidently if I did choose to leave, I believe the organisation would suffer more than me. Before I started here, my job was vacant for a year despite 2 attempts to recruit people.
    They need to make it a nice place to work, so that good workers are more likely to stay.

    I bet the geeks in the IT dept get to store stuff on their PCs!!!!!
     
  14. dobbin thread starter macrumors 6502a

    dobbin

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2002
    Location:
    England
    #15
    I wish I could do this. I love my iBook. If I am away for a couple of days on a business trip then I will take my own iBook rather than my work Dell laptop. The IT dept has disabled the modem in the Dell, but everyone else at work is glad that I still answer my emails while I'm away.

    They soon plan to stop me saving anything on the hard disk. Well whats the point in giving me a laptop then!!!?? I will soo have a £1500 Dell typewriter and not much more. No modem, no media player, no permament storage, no games, no nothing.

    Why should I have to use my own computer to do my job, just because IT are not able to keep the PCs in shape without crippling them?
     
  15. winwintoo macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2003
    #16
    For a long time our company *special ordered* our desktop computers without CD-ROMs in them (they were afraid we'd use them to play music and besides a CD-ROM must cost more right?) So the supplier took a truckload of desktop computers, paid some dork to rip the CDs out of them, billed our company for the time and trouble, sold the CDs somewhere, and then our company had to pay a guy to walk around with a portable CD unit to install software 'cuz there was no other way to do it.

    Saved a whole bunch of money.

    They also took the radios and air conditioners out of the company trucks and vans that the outside plant workers had to use in the stifling summer heat, but head office was nicely air conditioned because the computers wouldn't work without air conditioning, and everyone knows you can't run a company without computers.

    Big Brother might be watching, but he's not the brightest bulb on the old Christmas tree.

    Margaret
     
  16. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #17
    Get over it. It's the same any large firm with a half decent IT dept. Group Policy is a hugely powerful tool, and locking the desktop down with these policy’s can save a lot of work from idiotic users who install crap and then wonder why their machine is running slow.
     
  17. Savage Henry macrumors 65816

    Savage Henry

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2004
    Location:
    in a one horse, two house, three pub town.
    #18
    I understand the argument that the property and policy belongs to the company, but we have had similar draconian rules in the past. And say in the past because they seem to change depending on the ebbs and flows of managent power.

    • Web access used to be for the priveliged few, until the World Cup was on 5 years ago and managers loved keeping track of the scores at the desk.
    • Once we were limited to 100mb of mail on the servers, regardless of size of server. But until a major player kicked up the fuss about having to regularly trim his mail box every time he turned his lap top on, policy changed.
    • Also there used to be only one PC with CD-write capabilites, and permission was needed to copy data. Then a new big manager came onto the scene and not unreasonably wanted her staff to have such capabilites. Now we all can order such write capabilies on our new PCs and eyelids are not battered.

    I appreciate big business needs rules and policies, but I don't have any faith in the policy makers. Mind you we've only ever had an IT director for 14 months. He left last year after making such a pigs ear of the job. So I'd say we are more of the exception to a real-world company that everyone else on the thread describes.
     
  18. Maxicek macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2004
    #19
    I work in the automotive business. We have the same screensaver setup as described. A program audits our PCs for installed software and sends it back to a central server. Our internet access is logged. Everyone, from the MD down, wears a uniform (red trousers, white polo shirt, red sweatshirt).

    I know corporate IT are a real pain, but does it really matter? I still look at MacRumors at work. I use my PowerBook at home for everything else. It's more about how the organisation treats you as an individual, not about your screensaver. If I was working to 8pm every night with no recognition, then I would worry.
     
  19. Batesie1 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2003
    Location:
    Westchester County, NY
    #20
    we have the same policy here at a fortune global 500 co. BUT, they make us buy our own computers (don't ask), so i feel a bit more restricted when they get to control many aspects of my system.
    i wouldn't recommend it to everyone, but registry hacks have been quite fun and successful thus far (1+ years). i eliminated an annoying bootup disclaimer screen, got rid of other startup applications i rarely use, and got my screensaver tab back up in the display properties control panel. their network software seems to reapply some of their settings from time to time, but it's nothing a quick visit to regedit won't fix.
    as long as i don't get in over my head my PC should be fine. take that windows!
     
  20. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #21
    Your IT people must suck big time. Any rule should be reinforced through group policy with regular refresh intervals (exact interval can again be set by the admins). Even if you did change the reg entry to over ride a policy, it should only be a matter of time before it sets itself back again.
     
  21. Batesie1 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2003
    Location:
    Westchester County, NY
    #22
    yah, i've noticed the time period changed pretty recently. before, it was maybe once a day or so. now, it's more like once every couple of days. instead of updating it manually everytime the settings reset, i just import the latest registry settings i saved previously. this gets to be a minor hassle everytime i install new software, corporate or otherwise. annoying? yes. worth it- damn skippy.
     
  22. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #23
    LOL, most places should have the refresh set to something like 30-90mins.
     
  23. daveL macrumors 68020

    daveL

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2003
    Location:
    Montana
    #24
    Standardized, locked down desktop and server builds are the centerpiece of cost effective IT in any organization. If it's not being done where you work, your management are idiots, and I'd suggest looking elsewhere for a job.

    As for the poster that suggests that you follow their lead and hack the admin password: That's immediate grounds for termination in most organizations. In addition in violates the hacker laws in a number of US states, and you can be prosecuted, if your company chooses. There was a very high profile case in Oregon several years ago where Intel prosecuted a very well known software engineer for cracking internal passwords. He was trying to put together a case to take to management to prove that they needed to a serious security audit; Intel didn't see it that way.

    Why on earth would you want to put your job in jeopardy for the sake of a screen saver or other such nonsense?
     
  24. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2003
    Location:
    Toronto
    #25
    I feel your pain man. The computers at work were updated about six months ago and with the update came the "Managed Desktop Environment".

    Now the computers are leap years ahead of the old ones (at least they don't crash when I run macros on large files) but they put in GUI restrictions that drive me nuts. For example I have my own appearance settings to take it easy on my eyes, and I use the pipes screen saver (because it's so common everybody ignores it) and I remove their picture on the desktop (basicaly a styized logo telling me to call tech support if I have a problem) and just use a black desktop (again easier on my eyes). But every time I shutdown and log back in the GUI settings revert!!! There's nothing I'm doing that violates their useage policy (maybe except for posting here :cool: ) and I'm not downloading any screen savers or wallpapers but they still for some reason revert the gui settings to their own default. :mad:

    My solution is to lock the computer at night and only shutdown my computer on Friday night. That way I'm spared resetting my prefs (which are still thankfully saved on my computer) except for Monday's and I still get the updates that they send down the pipe. Not the most secure option I agree, but it's better for my sanity... which is suffering as it is. :D

    To top it off if I need to use any additional programs not supported by IT, they will charge me $40 a month for admin access, and $75 an hour if anything goes wrong with my computer there after... that's what we get for outsourcing our IT.... but at least I get to go home to my Mac, it's paradise compared to what I get paid to deal with!
     

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