avi files and codecs

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by andych, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. andych macrumors member

    andych

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    #1
    anyone help with this ongoing saga of mine...some avi files play no problem but the odd one will play without sound and apple trys to redirect me to a site with available codecs to install,only problem is,what codec?,i have installed a few and put them in my quicktime folder but no joy,i know this is a rather stupid problem but anyone out there who can give me a few pointers wil be greatly appreciated..
    cheers.
     
  2. AlBDamned macrumors 68030

    AlBDamned

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    #2
    I also find quicktime really temperamental with .avi files.

    Just don't bother with it and download VLC instead. It deals with pretty much everything (most video files) very, very well. :)
     
  3. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #3
    Coder-Decoder/Compressor-Decompressor
    Compression is not always involved, sometimes the files are special coded and are not made any more efficent or smaller.

    Where are you getting the media?

    Some AVI files have special "characteristics" and are designed to work with special pay or advertising services.
    Some of these codecs are not available for general use. As noted above VLC is a good program, it may solve your problems.
     
  4. AlBDamned macrumors 68030

    AlBDamned

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    #4
    Very Helpful. ;)
     
  5. andych thread starter macrumors member

    andych

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    #5

    cheers guys,i will give it a go..
    mucho appreciato
     
  6. Eniregnat macrumors 68000

    Eniregnat

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2003
    Location:
    In your head.
    #6
    The beauty of VLC is that it is an open-source software program. The problem with it is that it can't decode every preparatory format.

    AVI = Audio Video Interleave file format, it's really an envelope for stuffing audio and video in together with as far as I know, no other standards*. The codecs needed to decode and AVI file, are actually the important part. Technically, any audio/video file could be made AVI, and it should be easy to turn any AVI file into its native format by decompressing* the file and by removing the header and footer. In the header it states that it is an AVI file with a string of hex, then in it states the decompression routine/codec needed, then information needed by the decoder, and then the file should follow.

    There is also no guarantee as to the content of the file that is it could contain a text file, an exe, or something other than audio and video information. Hey, it’s already told the computer that it is a media file, so what’s to worry. So a tricky little person could design a codec...better yet a codec and a special player. This player uses the codec to play the AVI files and display advertising, guarantee your age, or delete the file afterwards- what ever. This could be good for both you and the company. They could even send statistics back to some company that could better target you, though the email your provided – adware. Or worse yet, they could build up trust with anybody using the codec and player, and then one day, it gets a movie that contains a bit of malicious code that the player executes while a person watches some interesting content.

    All of this aside, the AVI idea is really noble. It allows technology and compression technologies to move forward and it allows information about how to decode (and to get the decoder) the file to be included in the media. It allows enterprising programmers to utilize the format as part of a content delivery system that can incorporate DRM or features to insure its content is what the creator intended. It also allows irritating little nits to use social engineering in conjunction with software to screw with people’s information and data.

    Trust me, at some point, this kind of trick will affect OSX users in mass. For now, this kind of social and software engineering is targeted at Windows users.

    (*I don’t think it provides for any compression needs)
     
  7. AlBDamned macrumors 68030

    AlBDamned

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2005
    #7
    <SNIP>

    That's some great information there.

    Having used it for a while, I'd say VLC is probably the best video player for OS X. The only thing it seems to have trouble with is WMA files but they rarely come up so it's not a big problem.

    Quicktime has some great features, especially QT Pro, but it's problems with random .avi files do dilute it's prowess somewhat.
     
  8. andych thread starter macrumors member

    andych

    Joined:
    Mar 23, 2006
    #8
    ok i got it and it worked no problem,thanks a lot,
    i bow to thy genius.
     
  9. andcraig macrumors regular

    Joined:
    May 28, 2005
    #9
    Honestly. I dislike VLC.
    Sadly it is the best choice for OSX, sometimes MplayerOSX can pull things off better, but not often.

    Unfortunately VLC still has shoddy support for h264 inside of .mkv and makes them nearly unwatchable.

    I really want media player classic and my matroska codecs for OSX...sigh.
     
  10. winterdude010 macrumors regular

    winterdude010

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2006
    Location:
    New York
    #10
    Google says...

    I was having trouble with Google .avi files on google video. They recommended i download DivX. It worked! Also worked with many other .avi files.
     

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