backing up dvd's?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by xagoldsteinx, Jan 26, 2006.

  1. xagoldsteinx macrumors member

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    Dec 24, 2005
  2. calebjohnston macrumors 68000

    calebjohnston

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    Jan 24, 2006
    #2
    I assume you got the fonts sorted out if you're moving on to something else?
     
  3. xagoldsteinx thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 24, 2005
    #3
    well, the fonts only dont work sometimes. weird.
     
  4. calebjohnston macrumors 68000

    calebjohnston

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    Jan 24, 2006
    #4
    That is really weird. If the files weren't there it really shouldn't work at all. That's a confusing one. Maybe a quick call to apple? Couldn't hurt to try.

    P.S. I really misdirected this thread. sorry.

    BACK TO POST # UNO.
     
  5. thegreatluke macrumors 6502a

    thegreatluke

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2005
    Location:
    Earth
    #6
    Well, good luck.

    Backing up movie DVD's is illegal.
    Movie DVD's are encrypted so they're difficult to copy.

    Now, the police won't go breaking down your door if you try it, so if you were to try it... *cough versiontracker cough*

    EDIT: Sunfast beat me, and I was thinking of Mac the Ripper as well.
    :D
    Anyway, try that one.
     
  6. xagoldsteinx thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 24, 2005
    #7
    last time i did mactheripper, i put in a dvd+r and it said "wrong format" or something
     
  7. ChrisBrightwell macrumors 68020

    ChrisBrightwell

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    Huntsville, AL
    #8
    Hah. Backing up movies is within your rights as a consumer.
     
  8. Lexie4686 macrumors newbie

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    Jan 26, 2006
    #9
    Thats because Macs can only burn DVD-rs.
     
  9. Lexie4686 macrumors newbie

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    Jan 26, 2006
    #10

    exactly - i'm trying to back up my collection right now (my family's movies are my movies too, to take to college) and am having sooooo many issues. If its within out right, why cant we?!
     
  10. janey macrumors 603

    janey

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    Location:
    sunny los angeles
    #11
    I'm not a big fan of the DMCA - although backups should fall under fair use and the right to backup TV shows to watch later has been upheld by the SCOTUS (the Betamax case), making backups of DVDs requires circumventing copy protection on said DVDs - which is illegal under the DMCA. So an honest consumer can't make a copy of his/her DVD for legitimate reasons (like making a copy of a disk that'll be used a lot, resulting in scratching and unusability of the DVD), and as we all know, the studios don't mind at all when we have to cough up money to buy a replacement.

    DMCA infringes on fair use, prevents people from making legitimate personal use backups, it prevents parents from skipping DVD content unsuitable for their children, makes it illegal for people to rip CDs with copy-protection to put on their MP3 players (read: sharpie), prevents legitimate computer security research, and so on.

    But in the interest of not breaking US and international copyright law, please don't copy DVDs with copy protection on them. Technically it's illegal, even if you purchased said DVD and are just using it for personal use.
     
  11. janey macrumors 603

    janey

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    #12
    that's up to your drive - most nowadays can burn DVD+/-R(w) and dual layer DVDs.
     
  12. xagoldsteinx thread starter macrumors member

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    Dec 24, 2005
  13. ChrisBrightwell macrumors 68020

    ChrisBrightwell

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    #14
    You're preaching to the choir on this one, my friend.

    That said, I don't think anti-circumvention pieces of the DMCA have stood up in court (yet), so I still vote for fair use. :)

    Actually ... I vote for fair use, anyway. The DMCA is a product of lobbyists and ignorant legislators.

    So until someone puts a decision on the Fair Use vs DMCA case, or until disc companies are willing to replace b0rk3d discs, fair use wins. Chalk it up to the consumer rights activist in me.

    I disagree. If you bought the disc, it's yours. Call the studio and ask if they'll replace a scratched or otherwise damaged disc. If the answer is, "No," then copy away!
     
  14. janey macrumors 603

    janey

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    sunny los angeles
    #15
    My friend, I know...and...you must be mistaken. :p
    Chamberlain v. Skylink. US v. Dmitry Skylarov/ElcomSoft. Macrovision and MGM v. 321 Studios. And so on.
    Oh, and did I mention Universal v. Reimerdes? The one preventing the guys at 2600 Magazine from making DeCSS (the then-popular form of DVD copy protection) available on 2600.com - http://laws.lp.findlaw.com/2nd/009185.html
    Oh hey, the content protection system that's most likely gonna be used on HD-DVD and BluRay disks was the technology voted most likely to fail by one of the IEEE magazines. For the same reasons CSS failed. Nice to know :)

    Fair use is a tough term to define. In fact, if we could define it in such a way that it wouldn't have to be redefined and amended every couple of months, we'd be solving the whole issue. But while people disagree on the definition of fair use, people are going to set their own standards. The DMCA is a product of lobbyists and ignorant legislators egged on by huge companies that provide lots of funding and has lots of power on Capitol Hill.

    Don't wanna get into the copyright/cyberlaw stuff that i don't even half-understand but slogged through for my english term paper, I'm just gonna shut up about it now...(or, you can read up on the copyright act of 1970whatever..)

    However, nobody's gonna prosecute you for making copies of DVDs for your personal use, besides, companies would look bad suing someone who used that as a way to save $20, and didn't like post it on a torrent site or something.
    Well, the physical medium is yours. As in, the paper for the inserts, the plastic for the case and the shrinkwrap and the DVD. That doesnt mean the actual content on the disk is yours. It's owned by the entity that has the copyright(s) on it.

    And, just look at the way studios are charging $20 for movies for your PSP. Trust me, they will not be replacing scratched/damaged disks en masse for free :p

    So, I still stand by my point. DVD copying (in order to make it watchable) circumvents copy protection put in place, hence it is illegal. Whether or not making copies of said DVD, despite the circumvention, falls under fair use, is yet to be determined. In your book, fair use may win, but that's not something that's necessarily going to hold up in court :)
     

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