band of brothers

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jefhatfield, Nov 14, 2003.

  1. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

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    Jul 9, 2000
    #1
    who here has seen the six time emmy award winner?

    since military history is something i have always been interested it, even though i am very anti war, this mini series takes a more in depth view of world war II in europe than spielberg's other project, saving privare ryan

    the first day, i watched part one and part two and the scenes with david schwimmer as the company CO were brilliantly acted a he played the perfect villain

    part two on the same dvd got in to the thick of the battle at normandy

    later that week i got the second disk, part three and part four, which showed the arduous fighting and more death and destruction and i was emotionally dranied by then

    i gave it some time to breathe and i just watched the third disk which has parts five and six on it and more of the same depressing action and death...by this time, one wants to jump off a bridge

    next week i will watch the disk with parts seven and eight

    and the following week i will see the last disk which have parts nine and ten concluding the war

    part eleven shows the aftermath and what happened to easy company and its soldiers

    i would never suggest this gory, depressing, but well acted dvd to be watched all in one day or in two days...its too heavy in its subject makkter but is was designed to be that way
     
  2. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

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    #2
    awesome stuff - even more so knowing that it was all based on what really happened. I have the boxed set of DVDs but haven't gone through them all - saw the originals on HBO.

    I love the interviews with the soldiers as well.

    I'd also recommend reading the book by Ambrose.

    D
     
  3. D0ct0rteeth macrumors 65816

    D0ct0rteeth

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    #3
    I got it last year as my valentines day gift from the woman.. awesome stuff.. Im eagerly loking forward to the next series they are doing about the pacific

    - Doc
     
  4. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #4
    i loved BoB. some of the best filmmaking i've seen.
     
  5. manitoubalck macrumors 6502a

    manitoubalck

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    #5
    A similar series was produced, and is screening in Aus now, about the Vietnam War, called 'Tour of Duty.' The filming is of a totally differnt style, (to match the pictures that came out of Vietnam), but are equally as powerful as those in BoB.

    I would love to see a doco made like BoB, but from the Germans point of view, in much the same way as 'All quiet on the Western Front." Also watch 'Enemy at the Gates' about the Russian snipers in WWII.
     
  6. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #6
  7. jonapete2001 macrumors regular

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    #7
    I have read the book and i own the dvd set. Ambrose did a great job when he wrote this book. The story of those men, it really made me feel like i knew those men.
     
  8. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

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    #8

    america needs a long mini series, gore and all, like band of brothers, to chronicle a company during the vietnam war

    the hell of war, losing it, and then coming back to a very hostile nation

    it's a dark chapter in american history, but quite recent in our times and vietnam vets represent a disproportionate amount of today's homeless population in america and i come across them so often and get to hear their stories while i am doing social work helping the homeless, drug addicts, and drug dealers

    they did not come home to ticker tape parades and adoring masses, but were subject to the worse form of stigmatization and at the same time, where they were gave them access to some of the nastiest drugs which they also found in sufficient quantitiy on the street in anytown, usa

    the vietnam vets did not fight any less gallantly and their mission was not any less crucial for the balance of power in the world, but in the end, the soldiers in vietnam fought an "unpopular" war and midway through the war, even their biggest supporters joined the masses in considering them baby killers

    in war, as in any war, rules of engagement are not always followed

    take the second episode in band of brothers where a stressed out american soldier gives cigarettes to captured german soldiers, lets them take a few puffs, and then proceeds to mow them all down with his thompson machine gun
     
  9. manitoubalck macrumors 6502a

    manitoubalck

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    #9
    I believe that 'Tour of Duty' was a US produced series.

    About this statement, siad like a true American citizen. "Truth, Justice and the American way," The was unpopular just like the current war in Iraq is unpopular, because it was an unprovoked invasion. The vietnamise booted out the French and just wanted self rule, was that too much to ask? it took the loss ouf countless lives on both sides for the Americans, Aussies, etc to realise that.
     
  10. jonapete2001 macrumors regular

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    #10
    If you don't know( i think you do) this "unauthorized" invasion, are they ever authorized?, was to stop the spread of comunisim. it was the same in Korea. dont kid you self and think that the vietnamise people wanted self government. Maybe they did, but self government is not what they got. at least not a democratic or republican form of it. It this situation radical rebels took over. We were there just to get rid of them comi bastards. Then we would have left. the reason we left early is because the US was unwilling to commit fully to a real war. The US military could not bring its full rath down upon Vietnam, if it could i garantee it would be a different story there now.

    This was just another battle in the "cold war".
     
  11. Rower_CPU Moderator emeritus

    Rower_CPU

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    #11
    I second Mr A's recommendation for the book. It was a very good read and provided great detail to accompany the miniseries.
     
  12. manitoubalck macrumors 6502a

    manitoubalck

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    #12
    Like I said before, "Truth, Justice and the American way." Not everyone stands buy the morrals (if there are any) of the American administrations. Most countries just want to be left alone, keep quiet, make some money and not be invaded.

    It's not that difficult to understand. How would you fell if I walked into your house and forced you to change your way of life? Not very happy I would think. Especially if I came in armed.
     
  13. job macrumors 68040

    job

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    #13
    The series was amazing.

    The acting was spot-on. By the end of the series, I truely felt like I knew the characters. By the 11th episode you knew everyone's names and their personalities.

    Many of the scenes in the series were beautifully and artistically filmed, e.g. the scene in the third episode where the company was attacked by german armor. When Blithe fires his M1 Garand, they slow down the film when one of the bullet casings is ejected. I also thought it was nice that they didn't go over the top with gore. Many of the scenes were so well filmed; it is the perfect mix of art and history.
     
  14. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

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    #14
    when i deal with the vietnam vets, many who are decorated recognized heroes, they will be the first to tell me the war was wrong and president johnson was a son of a b****

    that being said, was it right for the american populace to treat the returning soldiers like criminals?

    twice as many vietnam vets died in the states after the war through suicide and drug abuse...this was really the most costly war in american blood than any war in history expept for the civil war

    as i speak some lone junkie, who was a vietnam vet, just died in central park or some park bench, unbathed, sick, and unwanted...i wouldn't want anybody to see this, but if you live in northern california and you want to help us out PM me but it's unpaid volunteer social work and you will be subject to some pretty unpleasant situations but we are not ones to just sit back and watch simpsons reruns

    tomorrow another vietnam vet (perhaps many) will take their life, and so on and so forth...by the time they are too old and all gone, my estimate is that 300,000 americans would have died directly or indirectly from the unpopular war
     
  15. jonapete2001 macrumors regular

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    #15
    SO i take it you were for the spred of comunism. And that is exactly what happened. Some minor comunist faction walked into Viet Nam and said Hi we are here to teach you all about comunism, and if you dont like it to bad. Dont forget that there were factions in the Vietnam area(Laos-Cambodia) that fought with the US. The were the munn. Come live in Wisconsin and take to the huge population that had to be evacutated after the us backed out. They will tell you the whole story.
     
  16. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #16
    _that's_ a heck of a conclusion.

    i've been to vietnam. it's a wonderful country, and i talked to an endless number of people who loved their way of life.

    i also talked to many who spoke poorly of the US' involvement.

    the conclusion i was left with: why the heck did we feel the need to bomb the hell out of this beautiful country?
     
  17. manitoubalck macrumors 6502a

    manitoubalck

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    #17
    my point exactly.
     
  18. yamabushi macrumors 65816

    yamabushi

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    #18
    There is a large population of Hmong in Minnesota as well. When a Hmong language class was offered in my elementary school I jumped at the chance to join it.

    A few years ago the state honored the many veterans who fought alongside the U.S. to defend their own countries in SE Asia during the conflict. A few were official members of the U.S. military but most were not.

    Because of the internal ethinic and political conflicts millions were killed or disappeared after the U.S. left. Some Hmong families I spoke with talked about how they no longer have any family left in Laos or Cambodia. Those that managed to escape genocide often fled to other countries such as France or the U.S. Their entire culture has been transplanted to other parts of the world.

    Wars are not kind. Justice and the meaning of right and wrong become abstract concepts. Power struggles ignore the concerns of individuals who suffer on all sides. People die just the same regardless of what ideological or political beliefs they hold. We can honor the dead best by living well and trying to learn from our memories of their actions.
     
  19. Awimoway macrumors 65816

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    #19
    BoB is outstanding. I would love to own a copy of it.

    Coincidentally, I DO own a copy of of Ken Burns' Civil War series DVDs, and I was watching one of them last night. It occurred to me that Americans have been dying for other people as much as their own since 1861. It's an odd American tradition. White northerners fighting for the slaves, among other things. You could even make the case that the European theatre of World War II was such a situation--it was Japan that attacked us. But certainly there's no doubt that Korea, Vietnam, Grenada, Panama, Gulf War I, Kosovo, and countless lesser post-WWII actions meet this condition. It's a weird thing and not always noble. Sometimes it gets used as a justification for arguably unjust wars. It's being retroactively used as justification for Gulf War II now that we can't find any WMDs. Interesting.

    Controversial since its inception (now more than ever), America is one weird country. There's just nothing to compare it to in world history.
     
  20. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

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    Jul 9, 2000
    #20
    the great innovators, freedom, immigrants, resources, small business, and companies are among the things that made america strong

    but being the policeman of the world could end up be our undoing
     

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