becoming a radiologist, I decided to do it

Discussion in 'Community' started by indifference, Feb 3, 2005.

  1. indifference macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    #1
    hey i decided to become a radiologist. I have hit some very big things as an undergraduate in reserach. But some questions I would ask of people in there life are:

    what in your life has changed, what in your diet has changed, is anything stressful-happening? Several people at school said I would make a good one. I met a friend who had a learnging difference, and he showed me his photo ID from three years ago in high school, he was going to commite suicide, I was able to tell from the ID. Then I saw him on Mon morning this week and his eyes were yellow, he told me he was fasting when I asked, but actually he had done some drugs, he told me today, he said he would not do them any more, but I'm not sure I totally trust him.

    Has anyone tried accupuncture? I had it the other day, it was quite interesting. I didn't mind having needels in my body before. usually they put it in the oppisate side of the pain but I asked it to be in the back and the lower legs, anyway, even though it wasn't the oppsite side, it still helped a lot. I had a cousin who was on meds, I tried to recommend massage therapy but they thought she couldn't do that because of where the pain was, so I said to try accupuncture for the reasons I mentioned above, anyway, she now doesn't have to have surger and is working but is still on the meds. So that helped her weather she didn't want to actknowledge it or not.

    What have your experiencs with accupuncture been? I hear that doctors are good here combing alternative medicine and regualar medicine, maybe I will be a good one?
     
  2. paxtonandrew macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    May 10, 2004
    Location:
    I Come From A Land Down Under
    #2
    I am a Radiographer, I love my line of work with a passion, ans wouldn't trade it for the world. I find that the Radiologists I work with have the tendency to be 'pushy', for want of a better term, and demand perfection, even if that is hard to get, especially when working with the elderly or children, the latter tend to fidget, and just as you are about to take the 'photo', they move, destroying the film, and wasting time and money. Look for work in the private sector, or open your own practice, that is (in Australia) where the money is, and there is less work, and more time for leisure. Good luck with your studies, and remember that working for what you want to achieve is more rewarding than not working for it and missing out. I only wish I was in the position that you are in at the moment, but for me, I have hit the limit on what I am going to do in my Career.
     
  3. oreomac macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2005
    #3
    I tried accupunture for my back but I didn't find it helped. I had it for a while, I was watching a programme the other day and now think maybe they were left in for a too shorter time or maybe it was just my frame of mind at the time, as there is something that accupunture works by the placebo effect.

    The whole of the health field is very into holistic care, which is not just about complementy therapies, so areas more so, the nursing course I attend has a module dedicated to it.
     
  4. indifference thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    #4
    I hear that you go into training first to become a physician, then a radiologist. how many years of training are we talking about? When I was working at the lab, they wanted me to take his MRI class tihs winter quarter but I couldn't. I would have to commuite up, from Olymipa. The cool thing about Washington is they are into alternative medicine.

    I was thinking about taking a fifth year, but felt that the fifth year, I was too tired. they had a cool forest class, but I feel the need to want to be in that hospital if I can get the job agian. The hardest thing is it is based on funding, I could loose my job just around funding.
     
  5. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2003
    Location:
    Chi Town
    #5
    Probably 4 years med school + 2-3 years of residency. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.
     
  6. indifference thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    #6
    I worked with a neuroscientist last year and he said you have trouble on tests. I said to him, i have my degree, why worry about tests? I can take the class or test again. Why worry, does it really help? Would it be better to go to Byster Univeristy, or go to the UW? I think I would rather go to UW and be a radiologist.
     
  7. indifference thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    #7
    hey, one time is probably not enough. The benafits may take longer, for me it helped right away. I was afraid to have needles, but it didn't bother me. You may just want to try another accupunturasit. Don't be afraid to go back and do it again if you know what the reason may have been.
     
  8. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #8
    While I didn't respond earlier because I had no idea what you were going on about in your 1st post, I'll just mention now that I'm studying to be a Medical Physicist, and no, you don't need to study as a physician before you can learn Radiology.

    Whily I (still!!!) don't know what some of the terminology refers to (ie: "Radiology"), as it depends on where you live, I'll tell you what 3 areas you can go into using MY definitions: Medical Imaging, Radiation Therapy, and Nuclear Medicine.

    Medical Imaging/Radiography: Simple really. Regular x-ray imaging (ie: chest x-rays), MRI, CT/CAT imaging, possibly Ultrasound.

    Radiation Therapy: Treating patients with radiation. Usually involves using a LINAC (linear accelerator) to produce x-rays, and directing these x-rays at tumours so that energy is deposited in the tumour region, thus killing the tumour cells. "Radiotherapist" and "Radiation Technician" refer to the same position, and requires the least education to do, usually 2 years of specialized training after you get a degree. :) Medical Physicists don't really have to treat patients, but they have to look at the results and approve treatment plans before radiotherapists/radio technicians can do anything, as it's THEIR ass on the line. Actually, the exact role of a Radiotherapist depends on the centre you work at. Some have more responsibilities than others.

    Also includes: Brachytherapy (for prostate and cervical cancer, for example), and proton/heavy ion (hadron) therapy.

    Nuclear Medicine: Generally using tracers to treat or image a patient. Basically involves labelling something (eg: glucose molecules) with a radioactive isotope and following it through the body. Eg: Radioactively labelled glucose can be taken into the brain, allowing for brain imaging. It allows you to see the most active parts of the brain while thinking. :) Includes Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, but PET and SPECT imaging are the biggest. You definitely NEED a PhD to do this, although a technician won't.
    -------------------------------

    In all 3 areas, you'll need to have a PhD to be the guy who knows it all and has to give permission for a procedure to happen. Junior Medical Physicists probably only need a Masters of Medical Physics, but if they want to move up in the rankings and publish research results (if they want), they'll need their PhD eventually. Technicians and such do not need a PhD, but they need to take specialized classes for around 2 years.
     

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