Benefits of switching?

Discussion in 'Buying Tips, Advice and Discussion (archive)' started by bmwdmb1, May 2, 2004.

  1. bmwdmb1 macrumors newbie

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    May 2, 2004
    #1
    Hey, I'm pretty new to the Mac community and just had a few questions.

    1: I am getting into a lot of web design, graphic design, print layout, etc. on Windows (Photoshop, Illustrator, Dreamweaver, In Design, etc.). I was just wondering about probably a pretty stupid question, but what are the benefits of a Mac for things like this. I know it's the industry standard, but is there any specific reason for this :confused: ? j/w

    2: Right now I have a PC desktop and laptop, and I was thinking about selling the laptop and buying a new 15" 1.33GHz powerbook. Do you think this would serve me better for the activities mentioned above then my PC laptop? Since I have heard that Mac is the way to go as far as for design.

    I think these might be a little stupid, but I'm pretty new as far as Mac goes so any help/advice would be greatly appriciated. Thanks :)
     
  2. LaMerVipere macrumors 6502a

    LaMerVipere

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    #2
    The thought of running anything creative related (photoshop, video editing) on a PC makes me cringe! Everyone knows that Apple is the way to go when it comes to all your computer creative needs. The OS is more stable, everything runs faster, and the mac is designed from the ground up with creative professionals in mind. Go Mac! :)
     
  3. neoelectronaut macrumors 68020

    neoelectronaut

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    #3
    People will have more reasons, but here are my two:

    1) Photoshop, Dreamweaver, and the like all seem to be much more stable on a Mac than they are in the Windows enviroment in my personal experience.

    2) Macs handle color extraordinarily well, I believe.
     
  4. Grimace macrumors 68040

    Grimace

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    #4
    I think a Powerbook outclasses any Wintel laptop. It is just so much more badass!! Desktops, I dunno. You can get very fast desktops on both sides, I think the G5s are pretty sweet, but running creative apps on a NEW PC desktop isn't all that bad.

    If you are going to get a mac - get a powerbook, your PC desktop will still last a while, a PC notebook is just a bad idea to begin with :p
     
  5. IrishGold macrumors member

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    May 1, 2004
    #5

    Unless its one of those new centrino ones or that sony sub 2 pound one...whew, that thing is nice.
     
  6. javabear90 macrumors 6502a

    javabear90

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    Houston, TX
    #6
    I do most of those things that you mentioned on my Powerbook and they run soooo much better on "Sphinx" (1ghz 17" pb) than my PC even though it is more than twice the clockspeed. I hope this helps.
     
  7. bertagert macrumors 6502

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    Jan 13, 2003
    #7
    A computer is a computer is my thought. However, Apple products are just plan cool. When it comes to running the applications that you mentioned, I run windows and macs for web design and the stability issue is no longer there. Both XP and OS X are stable.

    Now, as for the over all experience. OS X is sweet in my opinion. I just like the OS better for the look and feel. Not having to go get drivers and mess around with that is nice. Things really do "just work" on a Mac. Plus you don't have to worry about viruses/worms.

    If I were you (and I used Windows only until a year ago) I would look at the over all experience of the OS and the refined hardware Apple produces. There is no way some one could tell you honestly that you can get your work done faster on a Mac than on a Windows PC. Both get the work done with the same apps. Since switching myself, I prefer the simplistic style that Apple has to offer.

    Go with what makes you feel better and that you can afford.
     
  8. Awimoway macrumors 65816

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    #8
    Interesting that most of the reasons you're getting are emotional... it's cooler, it's the way design is done, etc. The color issue is a good one though. Here's a few more:

    The GUI looks much better. This may not make much difference in terms of objectively quantifiable performance, but ask yourself if you would rather work in a filthy, ratty, poorly lit studio or a clean, bright, modern studio? Every edge, line, window, and character looks 50 times better on a Mac running OS X. It's an environment that is simply more conducive to creative thinking.

    Also, the widespread use of widescreen displays with Macs and the lack of a Maximize feature on the Mac is better for creative work. Macs handle windows differently, more the way creative people tend to think. On Windows, people generally have one viewable window open at a time, with their desktop completely obscured. (In Dennis Hopper voice:) That's tunnel vision, man. On a Mac, you'll have windows from different apps, palettes, etc. strewn about your desktop. You'll be able to quickly move from one task to another and back again. The widescreen displays really help with this, because they give you more horizontal room to work in. And the new feature, Exposé, makes this all that much easier. No time is lost hunting through your taskbar or behind the maximized window to find what you're looking for.

    It helps to know the computer platform most of your colleagues use. Also, if owning a Mac brings you back to forums like this one on a regular basis, you'll be in more constant contact with a wide variety of creative professionals. An artists community is a good thing for an artist to belong. Come on in. The water's fine. ;)

    Mac OS X is a lot more stable. No viruses. No network/Internet security breaches (well, no major ones and MUCH less often). No blue screen of death. Applications rarely if ever crash. Getting online with a new connection is a snap. Doing just about anything on a Mac is easier than it is on Windows. And this isn't just biased, fanboy raving. Apple designs their products with the user in mind. They start with what the user will need or want to do and they build out from there. Microsoft designs products with the developer in mind. They start with what developers will find easiest and build out from there. That means less rights for the user, less control over your work environment, less trust of your computer, less freedom and, consequently, less happiness. Changing settings on a PC is a wild goose chase most of the time. Having to remember the name of the developer of a program so that you know what directory to open in the Start Menu is an idiotic way to use a computer.

    The hardware is built better. Generally speaking, the components are more reliable. The hardware and the software are designed together for a seamless, trouble-free experience. This doesn't guarantee that you'll never have any trouble with a Mac, but it's much less common than you'll find with any PC.

    It's good karma to support creative companies like Apple and bad karma to support monopolies. ;)

    Okay, I can see I'm veering into emotionally-based justifications. I'll stop now. Except I want to add that I was in the same place as you a couple years ago. I was just getting into design (more copy editing, light pagination work than design, but they're related of course) and I needed a new computer. I got a Mac because I knew that's what everyone in the biz used. It was the best decision I made in a long time. I love my Macs, and I will never go back.
     
  9. IrishGold macrumors member

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    May 1, 2004
    #9
    False :p
     
  10. Grimace macrumors 68040

    Grimace

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    #10
    Please tell me you aren't still confused about the MHz myth!! Twice the clockspeed means nothing when comparing Apples and....PCs. I guess I'll assume that you are equating the two (which is reasonable 1Ghz G4 ~ 2Ghz Pentium) and are saying that as equals - the mac still runs better.

    At least I hope that's what you meant... :p
     
  11. Mav451 macrumors 68000

    Mav451

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    #11
    Yes, thank for pointing this out. The common myth Mac users will tell you is that PCs are less stable, BSOD's, etc. Don't believe that. In all honesty, if you are coming from a 98/ME environment, this may apply, but if you are, like most corporations/businesses out there, you are probably already using 2000/XP.

    Thus the true main advantage is:
    1) Less maintenance (basically less tweaking required, though like you would defrag with PC's, you need to repair permissions and other basic stuff--nothing difficult tho).
    2) GUI beauty! I don't think I've heard anyone tell me it is ugly. Ever. Even the most hardcore PC user will tell you that either "It's nice" or at least "cute" - most girls love how iChat looks.

    Wonder how important GUI is to "creativity" and productivity? Well some have already talked bout it above my post, but the bottom line is -- as human beings, we just LOVE working in a nice environment.

    (e.g. Study in freshman dorm room? Or study in that newly constructed library? For the art guys, clean desk vs. messy desk. I mean this is a no brainer. And sometimes even the clean desk A vs. clean desk B (detail differences).

    Some people like grey desk vs. black desk vs. brown desk. Ok I'm getting carried away.
     
  12. Awimoway macrumors 65816

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    #12
    I respectfully disagree. Windows XP is much more stable than 98/ME, sure, but it's still not as stable as OS X. Not even close. XP does crash. Apps may crash in OS X, but the OS itself never does except for a very small group of people with seriously ****ed up computers.
     
  13. cyks macrumors 68020

    cyks

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    Westchester County, NY
    #13
    besides all the before mentioned reasons- I can name one simple one...

    Every single week there is a huge news press reguarding some new virus on the lose.... being a Mac user- you get to join the rest of us while we sit back and laugh.

    Are there virus out there for the Mac? yes... but nowhere near the same scope that are out for Windows machines.
     
  14. Mav451 macrumors 68000

    Mav451

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    Maryland
    #14
    *Shrug*

    While I am getting iBook soon, I am in no way going to disillusion myself that OSX is going to "never crash". That is utter nonsense.

    My experience with the Dual 2.0 G5's at Mckeldin Library @ UMD is a testament to that. I have experienced 3 Kernal Panics, 2 of them opening Adobe Photoshop. This lab has 14 G5's. 14. Don't tell me all 14 are "***cked" up computers.

    Like I said, however, the Finder crashes that LED to these KP's was reduced when they were updated to 10.3.3 from 10.3.2

    However, Safari and Finder continue to stall at random times. Safari STILL forces me to trash the .plist and its copy everytime I use it.

    "Not even close"?

    Use an "avg" Mac and NOT your own Mac compared to an "avg" PC (and not your own PC).

    This is why I believe that OSX is still a bit unstable from my lab experience. The Dells have NEVER crashed in the same lab in the SAME library (and they are used/messed with by a ton of undergrads running on 2 hours of sleep, every night 24/5 Monday to Friday).
     
  15. LaMerVipere macrumors 6502a

    LaMerVipere

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    Jan 19, 2004
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    Chicago
    #15
    lol NO.

    It would be good karma to throw away all your material possessions and go live in the forrest eating the green stuff that grows off dead fallen trees and meditating all day.

    Apple is no better than Microsoft or Dell, they all outsource jobs, and are all part of the capitalist system (which I, for one, am a great fan of) and at the end of the day they are all driven by greed. I need not go into the many examples of this, like Apple teaming up with giant PepsiCola which is devoted to convincing people to stuff their faces with fatty Frito Lay (which it owns) chips and washing it down with sugar water.

    Albeit that the greed Apple has drives them in a slightly different direction than its software and hardware counterparts, but it's business practices are no better. So if you're going to gauge computers by the company practices that resulted in them coming about, or their marketshare, and still want good "karma" then you shouldn't be buying a computer at all. But if you're only concerned at the end of the day with the product in front of you, how it operates, and NOT how it got there, then GOOD SHOW! I don't buy a Mac because it's good "karma" (there's no such thing as good karma when buying anything unless you're buying some bead jewelry off some peasant in Peru or someplace and those 5 cents will buy their family like a pig or a week's worth of food, and even then, if you've got money, why not simply BUY them food, and if you can BUY them food!...I will stop myself), I buy it because it runs smoother and looks fab doing it. If there was a PC that did the same, then I'd buy that. :)

    *end of rant :p*
     
  16. Dippo macrumors 65816

    Dippo

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    Charlotte, NC
    #16
    I will have to admit that XP has Blue Screened on me a couple of times, but Win2k3 hasn't BSODed me yet (of course what normal person is going to run that?)

    For the web design, graphic design, print layout, etc. that you are wanting to do, then certianly the Mac would be the superior platform.
    When you get a Powerbook, you will understand why...
    [​IMG]

    I would guess that you would have to buy new "mac" copies of all your software, which would suck :(
     
  17. bertagert macrumors 6502

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    Jan 13, 2003
    #17
    Although this may be true right now, if Apple were the the dominent platform the virus/worm would be targeted on Apples. Just wanted to point that out.

    For the poster: A computer is a tool. It helps you get your work done. The ones who know how to use the tool, and are creative and fast, will produce the best work. This could be done on a Mac or Windows PC.

    One down side to owning Apple products. People always want to see it/touch it/play with it. That was fun at first but now I just want to get my work done. Of course, I did pick up a hottie for two nights of fun because of my iPod.
     
  18. Awimoway macrumors 65816

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    #18
    Not holding my breath for that to happen... :p
     
  19. bertagert macrumors 6502

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    #19
    True, true
     
  20. bmwdmb1 thread starter macrumors newbie

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    May 2, 2004
    #20
    Thanks

    Thanks for all the great advice :D ...quit a community here.

    Anyways, I think i have decided to get a powerbook(15" 1.33GHz), is there anything I should add like apple care, .mac, ram maybe? If ram how much is good for os x?

    Thanks again :)
     
  21. bertagert macrumors 6502

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    Jan 13, 2003
    #21
    The more ram you have, the better. I have a 15" 1.25 with 1 gig. Works good for me and I'm doing what you plan on doing. Basically, get as much as you can afford. Protection plan can be purchased anytime during the first year of your purchase. So, if you want to hold off on that you can. The super drive (dvd burning model) depends on if you need it.

    Have fun with it. And remember to get a 20-23" flat screen to go with it. Nothing like coming home and basically docking your notebook and looking at the big screen :D
     
  22. Bedawyn macrumors regular

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    Jul 17, 2003
    Location:
    Asheville, NC
    #22
    Ya know, if I were a potential switcher, you would have just convinced me against the Mac. :) I will argue rabidly with your first point here -- the GUI _used_ to be much better, before Quartz Extreme and the PDF-style font rendering. Now it's just fuzzy and smudgy and dirty. I hear all the raves about how the font rendering is so great and can only say, well, you're not looking with my eyeballs. And the choice between a) brushed metal, stripes, and stripped-down customization and b) third-party apps that haven't come close to catching up to Kaleidoscope in theme diversity? Not a point in the GUI's favor. And maybe Panther's improved it, but Jaguar's Finder is almost as annoying as Windows Explorer.

    As for the window use... I have multiple minimized windows open all the time on my Windows machine at work with no problem finding the tools I need quickly. Though perhaps that's because I'm a Mac person at heart. :) But I can't stand the sort of cluttered desktop you just described as a benefit. On the other hand, I very very badly miss having Maximize on my Macs. We used to have it, way back when, and I don't understand why Apple now thinks eliminating options is a good thing. Lots of windows may be fine for some things, but other times I don't want to be distracted by a lot of extraneous clutter.

    All told, that clean bright studio? I've got it at work, on the PC. When I want it at home -- I boot to OS 9. OS X? Great for gazing at amazingly cool screen savers, but not for getting anything done.

    And stability? After years as a card-carrying Mac bigot, I hate to say it, but Windows2000 and the apps I use on it cause me a lot less frustration than OS 10 and the apps I use there.

    So, yeah, for graphics folks, it's the standard. And if your eyeballs like their first impression of the GUI, then go for it. But play with it at the store first and make sure it's usable for _you_, because no one else is gonna be using it for you. Yes, for the vast majority of people, the GUI is fabulous. Just make sure you're not one of the minority for whom it isn't before dropping that much money.

    If you _are_ one of the minority... well, then you can go drop the money on a used machine that runs OS 9. :) You'll still be better off than running Windows, and all ready for when Apple _fixes_ the font rendering.
     
  23. kgarner macrumors 68000

    kgarner

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    Utah
    #23
    The thing I like most about the OS X operating system when doing web design stuff is the fact that I can set up a local web server right on my computer. This allows me to test any scripts or server-side technologies that I may use (PHP, MySQL, etc.). Once, I get it working on my machine I can then upload it to my hosting service and do a final test. This is really more a formality as I have yet to encounter a problem upon loading. This is all done using the built in Apache WebServer and PHP in 10.3. Sure you can set this up on Windows, but you have to do it all yourself. OS X makes this pretty easy to configure and get running. Although I do reccomend the tutorials at macdevcenter.com to get even fancier.
     
  24. Awimoway macrumors 65816

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    #24
    bertagert seems to think there's no limit to how much you can spend. And if that's true, his suggestions are pretty good. But if you're not loaded, 1 GB of RAM is a good working amount to have. Don't buy extra RAM from Apple—it's a huge ripoff. Get it from somewhere like crucial.com. AppleCare is an excellent idea. It's not cheap but will provide some piece of mind. .Mac is convenient but not essential. If you're a power user who likes to do his own web server stuff, then it's not for you. But if you're not such a power user, .mac is a convenient way to put your design work online. The e-mail service is very well protected against spam.

    What I would definitely recommend is the AirPort Extreme card, since this is a portable. Using wireless networks on a Mac is a breeze and this will come in handy. I would also strongly recommend the built-to-order Bluetooth installation so that you can use a Bluetooth wireless mouse with your PowerBook. Using the trackpad gets old, especially if you're doing design work, and most switchers hate being locked into the one-button mouse. OS X will support multiple-button mice, but you have to buy the mouse yourself. And a wireless mouse is just a nice way to go with a notebook computer.

    The Bluetooth addition can only be done by buying directly from Apple and having them build your PowerBook that way. You can't decide to add it later. And I think that may be true of the latest generation of PowerBooks with respect to the AirPort card, too, so look into that.
     
  25. cyks macrumors 68020

    cyks

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    #25
    FWIW, both Airport Extreme and Bluetooth come stock on all PBooks now. (but still a great idea to get as a BTO if you were to chose an iBook)
     

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