Bicycle Maintenance help...

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by iSaint, Dec 30, 2006.

  1. iSaint macrumors 603

    iSaint

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    South Mississippi y'all, near the water!
    #1
    I have a Trek 820 that I ride fairly often. I'm trying to get back in the habit, and discovered the chain had a couple of rust spots from sitting in a shed for a few weeks. There is no bike shop in town, and Google doesn't offer much specific help for these questions:

    1) What cleaner do I use for cleaning the chain?

    2) What type of oil/lube™ can I use if my only source is Wal-Mart or a auto parts store?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. dllavaneras macrumors 68000

    dllavaneras

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Location:
    Caracas, Venezuela
    #2
    I've used mineral oil without a problem. If the chains are really stiff, I've been told that letting them soak in engine oil wil libricate it and make them useable again. I haven't tried it, so I can't be sure.
     
  3. Lord Blackadder macrumors G5

    Lord Blackadder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
    Location:
    Sod off
    #3
    I use Simple Green to degrease the chain, but any automotive degreaser will work. If there are minor rust spots you can remove them with a small wire brush. If the rust is significant, replace the chain - they're cheap.

    For lubrication purposes, I use teflon-based TriFlow, which has always worked very well for me. Don't use WD-40, it attracts dirt. Tri-Flow is fairly easy to find. Bicycles prefer a lighter lubricant, in a pinch a light motor oil will work.

    You'll also want to grease the seatpost lightly and maybe apply a little penetrating oil to the derailleur.
     
  4. Irish Dave macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Location:
    The Emerald Isle
    #4
    Any type of light oil will be fine. Most auto parts stores will sell small cans of light general purpose oil (3 in 1 oil)

    Dave
     
  5. iSaint thread starter macrumors 603

    iSaint

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    South Mississippi y'all, near the water!
    #5
    Great, thanks for the tips! The chain isn't stiff at all. But, I know I need to clean it. I have some Simple Green around (father in law loves the stuff). I've heard that WD-40 isn't really a lubricant; or if it is, it's not an oil. Thanks again!
     
  6. Lord Blackadder macrumors G5

    Lord Blackadder

    Joined:
    May 7, 2004
    Location:
    Sod off
    #6
    WD-40 is actually a solvent more than anything else, and is petroleum based (I think it has mineral spirits in it). It can function as a penetrating oil and light lubricant but is very inferior to stuff like TriFlow for most uses involving articulating metal bearing surfaces.
     
  7. MatthewCobb macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2005
    Location:
    Manchester, UK
    #7
    I find WD-40 excellent for cleaning grotty chains or freeing up seized mechs. But you need to use a light bike oil afterwards. Three-in-one was the staple UK oil of my childhood...
     
  8. Irish Dave macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2006
    Location:
    The Emerald Isle
    #8
    Mine too. It was used for everything from squeaking hinges, stiff locks, throttle cables, bicycle brake cables, Bicycle chain's etc. etc.

    Dave :)
     
  9. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Location:
    Jobs' Spare Liver Jar
    #9
    Chains are cheap - $30 buys a good one with a master link, which opens up the chain for easy removal and cleaning.

    An old trick is to take it off and soak it in diesel fuel in a coffee can before applying your regular lube.

    In any case, since it's rusted, I recommend buying a new one.

    edit: maybe I should clarify when I say "regular lube". There are tons of driveline lubricants on the market and there's always an argument over which is best; it's like religion within the cycling community.

    You could just go to nashbar.com or performancebike.com and order some proper chain lube with your new chain.
     
  10. MACDRIVE macrumors 68000

    MACDRIVE

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2006
    Location:
    Clovis, California
    #10
    I think of WD-40 as a solvent in a spray can. I use it as a degreaser that needs no rinsing.

    Tri-Flow is the real deal. For lubing brake and derailer cables, there's no equal. And hell yeah, I use it on my chain to.

    iSaint, do you have a chain breaker? Sometimes it's easier to clean a chain in an empty coffee can filled with paint thinner and a tooth brush. I guess I'm referring to mineral spirits, as lacquer thinner will cause the brissles of the tooth brush to fall out.

    Yeah, you can use Simple Green, but it has to be rinsed; left on there, it will corrode the chain.
     

Share This Page