Bird owners, I need help

Discussion in 'Community' started by jefhatfield, Jul 2, 2005.

  1. jefhatfield Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #1
    What is it like to own a parrot, conure, cockatiel, or similar bird?

    What preparations do you have to make?

    -thanks, jef
     
  2. YS2003 macrumors 68020

    YS2003

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Finally I have arrived.....
    #2
    Go with Chinchilla. Sorry, I could not help myself. Birds are noisy and may escape (dah) because it flies. Chinchilla will stay in the case (larger than a bird cage, though); but, it is quiet, smart (it underdands you). This is a lame attempt to make you a convert to Chinchilla from a BIRD.
     
  3. iBlue macrumors Core

    iBlue

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    London, England
    #3
    not to sound like a jerk but if you have to ask, you're not ready. (I have the best intentions at heart in saying so)

    parrots are like having kids, I know people say this in vain but it is very true. they are very demanding, loud, messy, wasteful, destructive and expensive. they are also very rewarding, smart, fun, often very sweet and a wonderful companion... however that is all in direct proportion to what you are willing to "give" (be it your time, love, attention, etc)

    it is a HUGE commitment, HUGE. please please please think about it very seriously before getting into all that.
    try a small bird first, like a cockatiel - in time if you feel you are still wanting a big bird (parrot) then look into it, just be prepared.

    you will need to have fresh (and specific) foods, proper "housing", lots of toys, and moreoever, lots of time and patience. (to at least answer your question)
    there are a lot of sites out there that give you the real deal when it comes to these birds. it is important to go in "educated". Even the sweetest, tamest, most easy going bird needs a proper environment and needs you to care for it "the right way". http://www.mytoos.com/ - that site is all about Cockatoos, by far one of the coolest of the parrot family, but like I said, it's a parrot and therefore not like an ordinary "pet".

    anyway,
    good luck in your decision. (sorry for rambling, I just feel strongly about this)


    - previous owner of a Moluccan Cockatoo, and I miss him every day (that is a long story though)
     
  4. YS2003 macrumors 68020

    YS2003

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Finally I have arrived.....
    #4
    I agree with the poster above. Any pet will be a commitment to any owner. I enjoy a company of my Chinchilla; I spend the time with her at night during her play time (outside her cage). I also buy her lots of toys to keep her company while I am working during the day and while I am travelling. If a person cannot keep the commitment to keep your pet nurtured and fed well, he or she should not take responsibility to caring any pet.
     
  5. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #5
    Prepare to make a 25 to 80 year committment.

    Longer than 5 - 10 automobiles
    Longer than a house, or three
    Longer than 3 - 10 jobs
    On average, longer than 3 - 10 marriages
    Longer than kids and grandkids growing up and graduating.
    Perhaps longer than your remaining time on this Earth...

    Think on that a bit before proceeding....

    Random links (not endorsed in any particular way)
    http://www.fortheanimals.com/menu2/parrots/ed_parrot_ownership.htm
    http://www.birdhealth.com.au/bird/parrot/aspets.html
    http://www.freeparrots.net/parrots/Think_before_you_buy.html
    http://www.stoppdd.org/downloads/newsletter/04_07_befbuy.pdf
     
  6. YS2003 macrumors 68020

    YS2003

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Finally I have arrived.....
    #6
    My Chinchilla can outlive me because her longevity is said to be more than 15 years. I can be dead with any cause by then.
     
  7. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2004
    Location:
    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #7
    Unless you are already 60 years old and male (or 65 and female), though, that isn't probable.
     
  8. YS2003 macrumors 68020

    YS2003

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2004
    Location:
    Finally I have arrived.....
    #8
    I did not mean figuratively. For a pet, 15 to 20 years are long years. I can be dead in a car accident or work/stress related illness.
     
  9. Plymouthbreezer macrumors 601

    Plymouthbreezer

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2005
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    #9
    Messy and loud. We've had Kiwi for 8 years now.

    Kiwi wakes us all up on the weekends... Aside from that, and the constant cleaning required, it's nothing too bad.
     

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  10. xsedrinam macrumors 601

    xsedrinam

    Joined:
    Oct 21, 2004
    #10
    We've had two yellow head amazon parrots, a blue headed amazon, a tucan, and a cockatiel. Lots of patience...and fruit. The parrots tend to be a "one owner (person)" though, if you get them young they more easily bond to more than one person. Ditto on the long term commitment thing. Plus, travel away makes "bird sitting" with a trusted, competent friend a challenge. And there's not getting used to 5 a.m. wakeup calls...especially with the tucan. They are beautiful birds, but have the fastest-working digestive track I've ever seen :eek: We've had relative success with using some tapes (whistling songs) which the cockatiel bought in to. His favorite is "O Susanna" which he nails, early on any given Sunday :D
    X
     
  11. sarae macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2004
    Location:
    madison, WI
    #11

    When I was younger, my family had two cockatiels. I really enjoyed having them, I found that they were quite personable and it was amazing the things they learned. We got them from friends of the family, and they were already trained - we would let them sit atop the cage during the day, and when we'd turn the lights on, they'd climb back inside the cage. The male also picked up a few whistles after a short period of time.

    We would get their wings clipped so that they couldn't fly away, it seems like a fairly common practice for smaller birds. I don't know anything about larger birds, except that it seems like a very large committment to make.
     
  12. Jaffa Cake macrumors Core

    Jaffa Cake

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2004
    Location:
    The City of Culture, Englandshire
  13. jefhatfield thread starter Retired

    jefhatfield

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2000
    #13
    is that like a wedgie?

    well, anyway, thanks to everyone for their varied responses on birds...it seems to me they are a big commitment with big rewards

    i will, of course, do a lot of research before i make any decision on a bird
     

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