Bit Ratings?

Discussion in 'Games' started by maraczc, Jul 26, 2003.

  1. maraczc macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2003
    Location:
    Toronto, ON
    #1
    In games, what exactly do bit ratings mean? For instance in options most games will allow you to choose between 16-bit, 32-bit, and 64-bit. Is this how many thousands of colours are displayed?

    Also, does it have any relation to the amount of memory in your graphics card? As in, if you have a 64 MB card you choose 64, if you have a 32 MB card you choose 32 etc.?
     
  2. Golem macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney,Australia
    #2
    Unless I have forgotten something its colours.

    So 16x16 is 256 colours.
    32x32 is thousands
    64x64 is millions.
     
  3. tpjunkie macrumors 65816

    tpjunkie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #3
    1 Bit color: Black and white (think ti-83 graphing calculator)
    2 Bit color: Black, white, and 2 shades of grey (Think original gameboy or TI-89)
    4 Bit Color: 16 colors or shades of grey. Think Mac II color.
    8 Bit color: 256 colors...Like old skool nintendo (although that could only display 52 color palettes)
    16 Bit color: Thousands of colors (65,536 IIRC) Like Super Nintendo!
    32 Bit color: Millions of colors....

    After 32 bits, you would have more colors available than the human eye can distinguish, and this allows you to use the extra bits as textures loaded into memory as "colors"...so more bits means better texturing, and nicer looking graphics. I'm pretty sure thats what it is, although could easily be mistaken.
     
  4. Schiffi macrumors 6502a

    Schiffi

    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Location:
    Missouri
    #4
    I think consols don't use bits as a color indicated (aka N64=64bit, DC=128bit, PS2=256bit)
     
  5. tpjunkie macrumors 65816

    tpjunkie

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #5
    Actually, the PS2 is a 128 bit system. (interstingly enough, it also has a 128 bit CPU, compared to the xbox's 32 and the gamecube's 64 bit processors). And yes the N64 was a 64 bit processor. According to what I have said, that gives a broad range of colors, and textures. However, the dreamcast or ps2 are 128 bit systems, and have many, many more textures available to them. This allows the games to look a great deal more real. All three systems are capable of displaying the same amount of colors. The the 128 bit systems (in addition to greater polygon capabilities) have a lot more textures available to display. However, the 8 bit systems that I grew up playing (NES, SegaMS (NOT GENESIS)) could only addres up to 256 colors with binary codes 8 digits long: 00000000= black 11111111= white and everything in between. So, yes, the bit rating is kind of the amount of colors displayed, but has become more than just colors now.
     

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