Blizzard is one of Apples best game company's!

Discussion in 'Games' started by ArmouredGuitar, Jul 16, 2004.

  1. ArmouredGuitar macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Location:
    Canada
    #1
    I would say Blizzard is one of the best game company's for mac. They have been making there games mac/pc compatiable since the begining and until there end. There new upcoming game World of Warcraft is also for mac. The European beta sign up has just started. So sign up and support Blizzard.

    ~~~~~Thanks~~~~~

    P.S Give you opinions about Blizzard!
     
  2. kainjow Moderator emeritus

    kainjow

    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2000
    #2
    Too bad their support for older Macs and graphic cards suck. I have a 1Ghz eMac running Warcraft III and it played pretty bad. But now it runs fine on my dual 1.8Ghz G5 (1.25GB), of course :rolleyes: You can play their games normally on older PC's but not on older Macs.. so I wish they supported older Macs better...
     
  3. BrianKonarsMac macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    #3
    runs fine on my 933 with a GeForce 4 MX...

    i'd go as far as to say Blizzard is the only Mac GAMING company (sure there are porter's but not actual developers).
     
  4. applekid macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2003
    #4
    I don't know why your performance sucks because I have a first-gen 17-inch iMac (800 MHz G4, GeForce4MX) and it runs fine.

    Blizzard's, aiight. ;)
     
  5. invaLPsion macrumors 65816

    invaLPsion

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2004
    Location:
    The Northlands
    #5
    Probly runs better on Nvidia cards...

    But, yes, Blizzard is one of the best gaming companies out there, period. :)
     
  6. Vlade macrumors 6502a

    Vlade

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2003
    Location:
    Meadville, PA
    #6
    id software always releases there own mac port within a month or two, I can't wait for doom 3 :) (thats why I have a PC too)
     
  7. Elan0204 macrumors 65816

    Elan0204

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2002
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    #7
    Blizzard really is great. They make really good games, and I like how they put the Mac and Windows versions of their games in one box. Too bad more companies don't follow Blizzard's lead.
     
  8. Converted2Truth macrumors 6502a

    Converted2Truth

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2004
    Location:
    Hell@HighAltitude
    #8
    Blizzard Rocks

    There is no doubt in my mind that a great % of the mac community buys 'World of Warcraft'. They've never abandoned mac because they make so much money. Although market share implies just the opposite...

    Blizzard has it figured out. Mac owners are loyalists. PC owners are adultrious freeloaders. lol
     
  9. Mac_Max macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    #9
    Blizzard is a good company. I don't really like any of their games but thats just because I'm more of an online shooter fan. They make quality products.
     
  10. AppleMatt macrumors 68000

    AppleMatt

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Location:
    UK
    #10
    I rate them as one of the top developers for Mac.
    The over-riding reason for this is their support of old products. Warcraft III is 2 years old I believe, but still getting updated. Also, it's not just bug-fixes and balance changes but performance improvements. That's just one example, StarCraft is another.

    Also, they'll give real advice in emails and honest technical reasons, for example describing specific bugs or poor-performance parts of OS X that hamper them. It's clear they're not the "get it out of the door" developers, but willing to go that extra bit further.

    AppleMatt
     
  11. Golem macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney,Australia
    #11
    I played Warcraft III just fine on a 800mhz G4 tower for 6 months. They have improved Diablo II significantly on older machines with version 1.10.

    They have also release OS X installers for their older games, how many other company's have done that!
     
  12. 7on macrumors 601

    7on

    Joined:
    Nov 9, 2003
    Location:
    Dress Rosa
  13. crazzyeddie macrumors 68030

    crazzyeddie

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    #13
    No one can deny the complete and total awesomeness of Blizzard. Their Mac support is unrivaled in the gaming business... even by the best Mac distributor Aspyr.
     
  14. Ninja_Turtle macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Location:
    Fullerton, California
    #14
    party

    so you thought about this all on your own???? wow...i would've never thought that blizzard was APples best company...it just never crossed my mind.... :p
     
  15. Earendil macrumors 68000

    Earendil

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Location:
    Washington
    #15
    Blizzard is not the best Mac Company

    Thought they no longer exist in the same form that they once did, the all time best Mac gaming company is hands down Bungie Software.
    With titles such as Marathon and Myth, they made early *high class* gaming on the mac happen. Their games go even farther back into time with Pathways and the other two I can't remember ;)

    Blizzard, while I honestly play their games like crazy, always stuck me as pretty poorly put together games. I mean, they functioned great, props for that. But all they are is pretty, there isn't any depth to them (at least not after coming from games like Marathon and Myth).

    Second best gaming company for the mac goes to Ambrosia. Damn guys, you are all either very young or else aren't thinking straight. I applaud Blizzard for sticking with us, but they aren't the best, and I wouldn't miss them all that much if they left. Not as much as I do Bungie :(

    Tyler
     
  16. Ninja_Turtle macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2004
    Location:
    Fullerton, California
    #16
    party

    totally forgot about Bungie and Ambrosia...yeah, i must agree...ill have to change my mind, i played alot of ambrosia games, and spent days playing marathon...so BIG THUMBS UP! :D
     
  17. LoadRunner macrumors member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2003
    Location:
    Manhaton Beach California
    #17
    Warcraft III works fine on my dual 500 g4 witha geforce 4 ti. ^.^
     
  18. neoelectronaut macrumors 68020

    neoelectronaut

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2003
    Location:
    Southeastern Louisiana
    #18
    Don't know what your problem is. The WCIII Demo ran perfectly on my eMac.

    Same with Diablo II. Runs spectacularly.
     
  19. mkaake macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2003
    Location:
    mi
    #19
    i believe the answer lies in your sig - 768 megs of ram. i too have an emac (1 ghz), and the 256 this came with really holds it back in a TON of areas - at idle, i have between 20 and 120 megs of ram free - when you only have those 20, you sure do feel everything you're doing at the time...

    savin up for that stick of 512...
     
  20. crusader247 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    #20
    Bungie

    yeah, bungie is the all time greatest Mac developer/publisher, and today is the greatest Xbox developer, arguably greatest game developer today, bar none. Not too many other companys developed games exclusivly for macs, although bungie did port M2 and oni to windows.

    Pangea still develops mac-only games, but between bugs, dinosaur and pre-historic car racing games, theres not much there to make PC gamers jealous.

    Don't foget id. I might be wrong but they don't have Aspyr or MacSoft port their games do they? As far as i know they do the mac porting themselves.
     
  21. neoelectronaut macrumors 68020

    neoelectronaut

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2003
    Location:
    Southeastern Louisiana
    #21

    Wow, is that ever short sighted. Woop-de-doo. They released a first-person shooter. That's original.
     
  22. Golem macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2003
    Location:
    Sydney,Australia
    #22
    Well it was at the time. It was a totally different time to now when it seems like 2 out 3 games in is a fps. Just a digression ,I thought about going shopping today before it started raining I had a look at what new games were available.
    Hmmm...
    Adrenaline pack,But I know kelly pro surfer demo was too buggy to play ,had tony hawk 2 lasted about 2 weeks on my machine so 4 wont be much better.
    Republic-Revolution never heard much.
    Delta force black hawk down- fps
    Battlefield 1942 -fps
    007 Nightfire - fps
    Space colony - sims?
    MOh Breakthrough - fps
    In the end I decided to not go,I dont really have that much time to spare over next couple of weeks anyway to break in a new game :rolleyes:

    But Back to Marathon. Before Marathon their was Wolfenstein,Doom and Pathways to Darkness and I had only played the first 2. That was all!

    I was so amazed to wonder around that first level and I could see out into space and back through a window and see my friend and I could shoot up and down and walk up and down and their was multiple levels and rooms with height! The guns felt so much realer :D . It might not have been completely original but it was a massive leap forward on earlier games like doom.
     
  23. Earendil macrumors 68000

    Earendil

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Location:
    Washington
    #23
    Short sighted? your hypocrisy makes me laugh.
    Don't even bother replying if you were born after Bungie was founded.

    Here is an article on Bungie taken from pcgamer.com
    http://www.pcgameworld.com/company.php/id/473/

    "The story of Bungie is the archetypal story of the American computer industry: a talented young man graduates from college and, in lieu of getting a real job, decides to publish a game he had made for his own amusement. In May of 1991, Alexander Seropian founded Bungie Software and published Operation Desert Storm, a meticulously researched tank-combat game. Shortly afterwards he teamed up with another gamer and computer junkie he met in an artificial intelligence class, Jason Jones, to publish his game, Minotaur: The Labyrinths of Crete.

    With boxes assembled in Alexander's basement apartment, Bungie's first games were sold at trade shows and gradually gained access to distribution channels. Minotaur, released in February 1992, established a pattern of innovation for Bungie that would make it prominent among companies writing software for the MacOS. Minotaur was the first Mac game designed solely as groupware, which can only be played by two or more people connected via modem or an AppleTalk network. This unconventional approach was rewarded with the development of a hard-core Minotaur following and can locate each other via a nationwide Users Directory maintained by Bungie.

    The next game, Pathways Into Darkness, was the creative leap that put Bungie on the computer-gaming map. Pathways was the first game for the MacOS to use texture-mapping in real time. The game achieved a smooth, continuous-motion 3D effect with richly detailed, high-res graphics, which combines with active-panning stereo sound effects to surround the player with its fantasy setting. Upon its release in August 1993, Pathways received rave reviews and won numerous awards, including MacWorld's Game Hall of Fame, the MacUser 100, and Inside Mac Games' Adventure Game of the Year. It is available in 15 countries around the world, and continues to sell heavily. It was also one of the first games to be written native to the RISC-based Power Macintosh platform. Pathways' success brought Bungie its first office and a small, hardworking staff.

    Marathon, Bungie's next game, was a milestone not only for the company but for the Macintosh itself. The game pre-sold tens of thousands of copies and dominated online message boards many months before its release in December 1994. Players were thrilled with the game's high speed action, unprecedented freedom of movement and stunningly detailed graphics, and office networks the world over blazed with multiplayer Marathon contests. Winner of the Macworld World Class Award, MacUser Editor's Choice, GAMES 100 and others, Marathon has attracted the attention of filmmakers, authors and numerous software developers hoping to use its technology—not to mention legions of hackers who make programs to edit, modify and otherwise expand the scope of the game.

    Following Marathon's success, Bungie realized that a sequel was necessary, both because of the many additional features and enhancements the programmers had in mind and overwhelming public demand. Marathon 2: Durandal was released in November 1995, and far from being a cheap rehash of the Marathon story, distinguished itself by being a new game in its own right. A faster engine, enhanced graphics and sounds, full networkability and network game scenarios like King of the Hill made the game a unique multiplayer experience. Marathon 2 has outdone Marathon's own impressive sales over a comparable period, is available in English, French and Japanese and has followed it's predecessor onto the hard drives of gamers in the remotest corners of the Earth.

    The year 1996 saw the most fundamental and sweeping developments for Bungie since its inception. With more artists, programmers, tech support and marketing staff, and with a war chest stuffed by nearly 500% sales growth, Bungie made the leap from Mac-only to multiplatform development, and from one to multiple titles per year. Marathon 2: Durandal was ported to Windows 95 and released in September. Marathon Infinity, released in October 1996, wrapped up the series and left players with all of the tools necessary to make their own Marathon worlds. Abuse, also released in October, was the first third-party game published by Bungie and breathed new life into the side-scrolling, platform genre. Weekend Warrior, the next third-party project, shattered the mold of fully 3D fighting games with a comic gameshow format, fully-realized multiple-elevation arenas and unique touches like FaceMappingTM, which maps a photo of the player onto their game character for the ultimate in "customization." Staking its claim at the high-end of available technology, Weekend Warrior was released in January 1997 in a bundle with the first generation of 3D cards for the MacOS.

    Bungie felt it only proper to wrap up the Marathon series with a compendium of all things Marathon, and in May 1997 shipped the Marathon Trilogy Box Set. This package included all three Marathon titles, the best levels and add-ons the public had created for the games and the Marathon Scrapbook for a look back at the whole dizzying phenomenon. Also at this time, the organization spawned its first offspring with the formation of Bungie Studios West, an office for new business development and programming in the heart of Silicon Valley. This meant that Bungie could work on two internal titles simultaneously and alternate their releases to continually feed the game-hungry market.

    Meanwhile, the team that had brought Marathon to life had not been idle. Though thousands of fans encouraged them to continue making sequels to Marathon until the end of time, they had their sights set on bigger "game". After four years of making first-person-perspective shooters, they were ready for a new type of action. Thus was born Myth: The Fallen Lords, by far the most ambitious title Bungie had attempted, and the first internally-developed game since Minotaur to depart from the 3D, first-person shooter genre.

    Released simultaneously for Macintosh and Windows 95 in November 1997, Myth: The Fallen Lords has proved a phenominal success. As the first real-time strategy game to put the player in a true 3D landscape, and forego the building paradigm in favor of tactical battlefield action, Myth stands out from the hordes of more traditional RTSGs in the eyes of the press and public. Thus far it has been declared Game of the Year by Computer Games Strategy Plus and Strategy Game of the Year by Computer Gaming World, ranking high in Editor's Choice lists across the industry. As of late 1997, the game has shipped 350,000 copies worldwide, in four languages, on two platforms, with tens of thousands of players vying for the top rank on its internet gaming service, bungie.net.

    By any account Myth: The Fallen Lords has made Bungie a recognized player in the game industry, and the organization is growing in response. Bungie has brought in more than a dozen new staff to help market and support Myth and to speed development of future titles. It remains to be seen whether Myth will inspire other entries into the 3D real-time strategy genre, but if nothing else, it's proof that a small team with a strong product vision and the marketing cunning to back it up can still produce a very big game.
    "

    Obviously this Article only takes the story of Bungie Software to the year 1997. To the young kids Bungie has been praised for Halo. Even if you don't like Halo, you have heard about it. But for all of us older gamers that were involved in gaming and the online communities predating Halo, we know that Bungie was well known, and producing games that were incredibly thought out for the time.

    Tyler
    Earendil
     
  24. neoelectronaut macrumors 68020

    neoelectronaut

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2003
    Location:
    Southeastern Louisiana
    #24
    First of all, I was born in 1985.

    Second of all...best developer of all time? I'm pretty sure that title would go to Nintendo. Not only did they single-handedly save the videogame industry altogether with the NES, but uh...Metroid? The Legend of Zelda? Mario? Some of the best damn games ever made? Hell yes. And Shigeru Miyamoto? Don't even get me started on the guy. They've got at least a 200-year jump on Bungie. (Seriously.) :)
     
  25. Earendil macrumors 68000

    Earendil

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2003
    Location:
    Washington
    #25
    First, Read the title of the thread, and realize that all replies are in reference to this title.

    Second, The poster that you responded to said "Today" and currently "game of the year" titles are being handed out to Bungie, not Nintindo.

    Third, Wasn't Nintindo more a group of developers? Bungie had just a hand full of programers and artists working for them back in the days, and back in the days goes all the way to Myth 2. Halo had more funding of course do to the Microsoft buy out.

    Tyler
    Earendil
     

Share This Page