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Booting Snow Leopard on Mountain Lion

Discussion in 'OS X Mountain Lion (10.8)' started by sjd1, Mar 22, 2013.

  1. macrumors newbie

    #1
    Hi I have a new mac with Mountain 10.8.2 on it and I just installed Snow leopard 10.6.8 onto an external hard drive using my old mac to do this. Snow leapard on the external drive boots fine on my old mac so I installed it correctly BUT when I plug it into my new mac with Mountain lion and hold the option key it shows me the external snow hd I click to boot from it and nothing happens. The screen sits on the apple sign forever. PLease can anyone help me to be able to boot snow and run it on my new mac from the external drive. Thanks:rolleyes:
     
  2. Moderator

    maflynn

    Staff Member

    #2
    Your new mac is incapable of booting up with Snow Leopard as that operating system is too old and does not support the new hardware. The OS that came with your Mac is the oldest version it can use.
     
  3. Guest

    Sky Blue

    #3
    What "new mac" is it? I doubt it's able to run Snow Leopard.
     
  4. macrumors newbie

    #4
    Thanks for help firstly....It's a 2012 macbook pro 2.7 16gb quad core. Would there be any way to partition it (without deleting what's there) or is it just going to be a no no to get snow to work full stop. :mad:
     
  5. macrumors 68030

    Krazy Bill

    #5
    There is no way to run SL on your machine. Welcome to planned obsolescence.
     
  6. macrumors newbie

    #6
    Yeah this shiny new machine not looking quite so great. :( I've used my old machine more since i got it. Oh well. Thanks for the responses folks no doubt there will be many more questions to ask on different matters
     
  7. macrumors 6502a

    #7
    Why do you want to run snow leopard on it?
     
  8. macrumors 68020

    #8
    You can virtualise Snow Leopard with Parallels or VMWare Fusion. There are threads on how this can be done.

    ----------

    I can think of one big reason... Rosetta.
     
  9. macrumors 6502a

    #9
    Rosetta?
     
  10. macrumors 68020

    #10
    Rosetta is a framework that gives the ability to run legacy PowerPC apps on an Intel Mac. For example older versions of the Adobe Creative Suite and MS Office.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosetta_(software)

    It was phased out with Lion (Mac OS X 10.7)
     
  11. macrumors 6502a

    #11
    Install Snow Leopard Server into Parallels 8 (or VMWare Fusion) to continue to have access to Rosetta and run your PowerPC apps concurrently with Mt. Lion.

    Snow Leopard Server is now available at the Apple Store for $19.99 + sales tax & shipping - 1.800.MYAPPLE (1.800.692.7753) - Apple Part Number: MC588Z/A (telephone orders only).

    [click on image to enlarge]

    Adobe Creative Suite 2 (CS2) Photoshop running in SLS in Parallels 8 in Lion or Mt. Lion:
     

    Attached Files:

  12. macrumors 6502a

    #12
    Forgive my ignorance, but what is so compelling about old PPC apps? I'm sure there are more modern alternatives out there.
     
  13. Guest

    Sky Blue

    #13
    Nothing. People will find any old reason to resist change.
     
  14. MichaelLAX, Mar 25, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013

    macrumors 6502a

    #14
    Let me count the ways:

    Software acquired by a competitor whose sole purpose was to kill it in favor of their software product: Aldus Freehand MX which was purchased by Adobe.

    Software marketed by a company that does not like to put resources behind their Mac versions: Intuit's Quicken Deluxe, whose Mac version has been sorely ignored by the company in favor of their PC version. The last version of Quicken (not even Deluxe) was released in 2007 and was PowerPC. Even though Lion removed Rosetta capability in early 2011, it was not until March 2012 that Intuit finally released an Intel capable version of Quicken; and it was still the 2007 version, at that!

    Software marketed to a segment of the marketplace that just does not have the resources to consistently update their software: the education segment of the software industry. Schools just cannot keep purchasing updates of educational software year after year. Students are given textbooks with CD-ROM educational tools that were written in the mid-2000s and are still PowerPC.

    Orphaned software: Both Scrabble and Chessmaster 9000 have never been upgraded by their publishers and I think that their licenses to do so have expired.

    Upgrades too expensive for the average user: Adobe's Creative Suite has become exceedingly expensive for the average user to upgrade.

    ... and so on!

    So to summarize: there is examples where modern alternatives do not exist, or are too expensive for some users (especially students) to acquire.
     
  15. macrumors 6502a

    #15
    You actually think you added something of value to the discussion; or just having a slow day?
     
  16. Guest

    Sky Blue

    #16
    about as much as you have.
     
  17. MichaelLAX, Mar 25, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2013

    macrumors 6502a

    #17
    Except that while you were posting a schoolyard retort, I was working on a full, substantive, and factually correct answer to his question...
     

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