Break in period for new Macs?

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by alexf, Sep 8, 2004.

  1. alexf macrumors 6502a

    alexf

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    #1
    I recently read that it is a good idea to let a new Mac (G5, at least) run for awhile before doing anything to it (i.e. installing anything, etc.), as this may prevent future problems down the road.

    Is there any validity to this? I know that computers are not cars, but intuitively it seems like a kind of "break in period" might make sense.

    I am not technologically knowledgeable enough to have any idea about this, so hopefully someone more inclined can enlighten me. :)
     
  2. jeremy.king macrumors 603

    jeremy.king

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    #2
    [sarcasm]Yeah, you need to wait til the circuits are fully lubricated and all gaskets and rings are fully seated. This only happens at running temp over a perioud of time Make sure you vary your CPU utilization across the full allowable range. :rolleyes: [/sarcasm]

    I have never heard of a break-in period for a computer, but if someone has, enlighten me.
     
  3. jsw Moderator emeritus

    jsw

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    #3
    AFAIK, the most this would do is expose any hardware (or possibly software) issues that came with the machine prior to adding other hardware/software. If your system was shipped in a bad state, it's easier to deal with Apple Support if you've done nothing to the system than it is if you've augmented it in any way (in which case they'll tell you to strip it to it's original state and see if the problem persists).

    So, I'd say the only real plus is to flush out preexisting bugs. If your system is in good shape when it's shipped to you (or when you pick it up at the store) - and the vast majority are - then there is no advantage to a break-in period.
     
  4. kgarner macrumors 68000

    kgarner

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    #4
    I think that adding apps in slowly may be appropriate, but only if you feel that they may cause some undesirable effects and want ot know which app did it. Personally, I usually like to my mac set up quickly. But I don't install a tone of shareware/beta apps right away. Installing a bunch of things like Photoshop, Final Cut, etc. I think is okay. At least i have never encountered a problem doing that.
     
  5. wdlove macrumors P6

    wdlove

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    Oct 20, 2002
    #5
    This is the first time that I have heard of a break in period for a Mac. Happy to hear the above responses. Although it would make sense to setup the Mac for first time one day. Leave it run all night, that way normal OS X maintenance would run. The next day go ahead and install your software.
     
  6. mklos macrumors 68000

    mklos

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    #6
    As far as I know...every Mac that leaves Apple has already gone through a break in test. Even refurbished Macs go through a break-in process before its made available for shipment.
     
  7. alexf thread starter macrumors 6502a

    alexf

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    #7
    From what I have heard, I think that ONLY refurbished Macs go through a "break-in test" (or "full burn-in testing," as they call it).

    But this is just what I read in a post here awhile ago, so who knows if it is true or not... What's more, I think the poster was just speculating anyhow.

    I does make sense, though, that Apple would only do something as comprehensive as the full burn-in test on returned models. To let every new computer run for 24 hours or so at full processor speed probably would not be cost effective.
     
  8. Timelessblur macrumors 65816

    Timelessblur

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    Jun 26, 2004
    #8
    general the break in period is general just having all heating up all the parts getting them burned in. Getting the termal pasted on the CPU to go though several heat up and full cool down processes. That can general take around 100-300 hours to get completely done and the computer needs to be powered down serveral times over the corse to let it cool down like turning it off for a night. That also shows that there is no way apple can do the full break in.



    I think that what it means. Give the computer some time to get it all done
     
  9. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    May 19, 2002
    #9
    It's best to run fsck and Disk First Aid on the new machines.

    Catalog/file system errors happen in the bulk HD copies, these can create some problems.

    You'll either run into these problems or a HW problem, if you'll run into any real problems.

    ---

    Playing around with the computer and base system load for a day should eliminate these as problems when you start loading things later.

    We had a guy here who kept reloading the OS, and had major problems every time (turned out he kept putting Norton back quickly every time -- which was the problem).

    ---

    If you can take the time to do it, running the HW Test for a couple days straight is never a bad idea -- computer companies used to burn-in computers this way, now only a few high-end niche mom & pop PC game machine assemblers do it.

    Usually the computer HW makers test machines for a couple hours, anything more really clogs the production line.

    And that "full burn-in testing," of Apple refurbs is sticking the HW Test disk in and letting it run for a hour/two to see what repairs need to be made -- fixing them and kicking them out the door.
     
  10. JeDiBoYTJ macrumors 6502a

    JeDiBoYTJ

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    #10
    When I first bought my powerbook, I immediately installed all updates. took a good 2 hours too. then the next day I slowly started install programs. FCP... then Photoshop... then FlashMX. making sure each was optimized properly. then later a few other programs, followed by some shareware and such.

    Havnt had any real problems installing any software... But sence ive bought the computer, I've had 1 kernal panic, forgot what caused it though, it was before I upgraded my RAM to 1gig. other than that, its been smoooooth sailing :)
     
  11. alexf thread starter macrumors 6502a

    alexf

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    #11
    I'm not quite sure what this means...
     
  12. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    May 19, 2002
    #12
    If you don't check the "base install" and computer to see if it works before you load all your software now, it's harder to tell later if you have a problem with the OS, HW, or 3rd Party SW.
     
  13. Edot macrumors 6502

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    Jan 29, 2002
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    NJ
    #13
    Breaking in circuits

    Some people say that amplifiers and electronics especially audio, sound better when you allow the circuits to warm up. I think this is totally bogus, but I have not done any research. From what I know circuit elements capacitors and whatnot have very fast response times. Were talking microseconds. I think it may be the peoples ears that do the warming up and they think the music sounds better because the circuits "warmed up". I think this is even more ridiculous as far as computers go since everything is digital. You are not going to get different things happening because a circuit is hotter. As far as testing out the components, everything will break down sometime if you give it enough time. I say don't worry about such a silly thing and use it.
     
  14. FuzzyBallz macrumors 6502a

    FuzzyBallz

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  15. Timelessblur macrumors 65816

    Timelessblur

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    Jun 26, 2004
    #15
    The "break in period" is not for the circits. It more for thermal paste on the CPU graphic card and where ever else it is. General it takes about 300 hours of up time to get the computer for that all to get done. All that really happens is the temps will drop a few degree cel over the peirod of time.

    The only thing diffence that really needs to be done during the time is to turn off your computer for a few hours each day so the parts can cool down and the paste can cool down. It helps get it in to all the little microscopic holes to increase thermal conductivity. Other wise there is not really "break in" It just takes some time for the paste to get settled into place.
     
  16. alexf thread starter macrumors 6502a

    alexf

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    #16
    Interesting indeed...

    I had never even heard of "thermal paste"... :)
     
  17. FuzzyBallz macrumors 6502a

    FuzzyBallz

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    #17
    Neither does the the average computer user, PC or Mac. TIM, or thermal interface material is used to accelerate heat transfer between any heat source (GPU, CPU, etc) to the the cooling device (heatsink). Artic Silver is a huge producer and innovator of TIM.
     

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