British English vs American English [moved from the Jony Ive thread]

Discussion in 'Wasteland' started by nuckinfutz, Nov 5, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. nuckinfutz, Nov 5, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 6, 2012

    macrumors 603

    nuckinfutz

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2002
    Location:
    Middle Earth
    #1
    Oh noooes ! Ive is British. All of the words ending in "ize" are going to change to "ise" in autocorrect. The British are coming!


    Moderator Note:

    This was derailing the Jony Ive is Now Playing the Steve Jobs Role thread so it has been separated into a new discussion.
     
  2. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2009
    #2
    Instead of skeuomorphisms, we'll end up getting little pop up quotes instead of notifications saying "you're all coat and no trousers, you are."
     
  3. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2011
    #3
    There's no such thing as American English. There is English, and there is wrong. :)


    Or as the TV show QI explained a few weeks ago, 'ise' is the Oxford way (as in Oxford English Dictionary) 'ize' is the Cambridge spelling.
     
  4. nuckinfutz, Nov 5, 2012
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 6, 2012

    thread starter macrumors 603

    nuckinfutz

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2002
    Location:
    Middle Earth
    #4
    Touché ;)
     
  5. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2012
    #5
    You mean the correct spelling for the language that we created for you to bastardise and butcher?
     
  6. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2005
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    #6
    I lol'd.
     
  7. macrumors 65816

    gorskiegangsta

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011
    Location:
    Brooklyn, NY
    #7
    That's the nature of the beast. English was not created from scratch. It evolved and morphed through the years.
     
  8. Moderator

    OllyW

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Location:
    The Black Country, England
    #8
    It already does. ;)

    Screen Shot 2012-11-05 at 23.12.11.png
     
  9. macrumors regular

    LeoNobilis

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    #9
    Exactly. I feel embarrassed when "rumour" is made a "rumor" of, and "…-ise" is "corrected" into "…-ize" by my iPhone's autocorrection at times (i.e., before I've set up the keyboard properly). Not quite as bad as speaking in Redneck "English" accent (not that I ever could or would!), but bad enough. The gibberish they make of "-er", "not" pronounced as "nut" and that sort of thing. Then, the words like "dude" and the like… No class whatsoever.
     
  10. macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    London, England
    #10
    Well thank F*&%k for that, about time you colonials started speaking proper!:)
     
  11. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    #11
    haha now it's American "English" huh?
     
  12. macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    London, England
    #12
    in other words butchered and bastardised?:)
     
  13. Moderator

    Nermal

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    Whakatane, New Zealand
    #13
    -ly :)
     
  14. macrumors 6502a

    ohbrilliance

    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    #14
    You do realise that much of 'American English' is the old way of spelling things, and British English is the one that's changed, i.e. 'wrong'?
     
  15. macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2008
    Location:
    London, England
    #15
    Oi mate it's proper aint't it! Know what I mean sunshine?:)

    ----------


    Yeah but the language is English and therefore the definitive version should come from England, I mean WTF is "validated parking"? I don't think that's the old way of saying "free parking"?
     
  16. macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2008
    Location:
    Oxford, England
    #16
    Indeed! ;-)
     
  17. macrumors 65816

    Drunken Master

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    #17
    Properly?

    Loads of people from England struggle to speak their own language, e.g. "I'm going wif him to the show" or "He broke me car!"

    ;)
     
  18. JAT
    macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2001
    Location:
    Mpls, MN
    #18
    Was this supposed to be irony? Since modern English is basically a bastardized melting pot of many languages, both dead and current. Far more "foreign" words exist in English than any other language.
     
  19. macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    #19
    Sure there is. American English is a dialect of English spoken in the United States of America. Even within England you have variations on the way the language is spoken. Which is the correct one? Are you saying only the professors at Oxford and Cambridge speak correct English? They probably even disagree on some things. A language is not a static thing and to try to prescribe a correct way it should be spoken or written is impossible.
     
  20. macrumors member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2012
    Location:
    London
    #20
    The reverse, actually. -ize is the Oxford Dictionary standard, whilst Chambers, the other main British dictionary source, is -ise. Both versions come ultimately from Greek but -ise is of French/Latin influence, whilst -ize comes from German roots.

    Fowler's "The King's English" (and you can guess how old this is) promotes -ize and was extensively referred to by Winston Churchill when berating his staff on their use of English. But then Churchill was half American. LOL.

    There's a few words that even in the US have an -ise suffix such as compromise and exercise.
     
  21. macrumors member

    Joined:
    May 9, 2012
    #21
    A lot of what makes something "correct" in English has to do with precedent. What famous writings contain certain usages and what is their frequency of appearance in the literature? The second has to do with logic. Is it logical to say something a certain way? Most other "rules" you will find exceptions to, and many of the rules we were taught are just plain wrong, famous examples being "don't end a sentence in a preposition" or "don't split an infinitive." And a lot of the prescribed rules have as much to do with the grammarian's preferences as anything else. Fowler, whom you mentioned, is famous for having had a lot of weird personal peeves, which can be found all over the place in his "Modern English Usage."
     
  22. Mousse, Nov 6, 2012
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2012

    macrumors 65816

    Mousse

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2008
    Location:
    Flea Bottom, King's Landing
    #22
    Hail no. Ain't no way I'm giving up my Southern drawl for your Cockney.:D:D:p
     
  23. macrumors 68020

    sviato

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2010
    Location:
    HR 9038 A
    #23
    Also don't like when people from England use "a" instead of "I", e.g. "why should a do this?"
     

    Attached Files:

  24. macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2005
    Location:
    UK
    #24
    Because they have poor grammar or they are speaking with an some accents.

    In written English English it is "Why should I do this?"
     
  25. macrumors G3

    dmr727

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2007
    Location:
    Southern California
    #25
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page