brooks institute of photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Rickay726, Oct 5, 2006.

  1. Rickay726 macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    #1
    hey guys, im a junior in high school and i really need to start looking at colleges this year, so i went online to this schools web site, apparently it is very good for photography ( Brooks Institute of Technology) while looking at this website i decided i wanted to major in photography and then minor in film. how ever i was completly blown away by how many different branches to photography there are. i thought that a photographer was a photographer. not that there were any specialist. so could some one help me out and tell me what some of these actually mean. and do you guys think that minoring in film is a bad idea?

    heres the web site http://www.brooks.edu

    oh and also, has anyone gone to this school?
     
  2. Karpfish macrumors 6502a

    Karpfish

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    #2
    Sorry, but I don't think this s the school for you. If you think a photog is a photog, you probably dont want to major in photography. But, you may want to read up on www.sportsshooter.com about the brooks institute. You wont be able to join, but you can read. Could you post some of your work, so we can get an idea of how you shoot? Also, what kind fo stuff do you do? Generally people will major in Photojournalism(sports photogs,news photogs etc) or in Art with photography(not sure exactly what it would be called)
     
  3. pdpfilms macrumors 68020

    pdpfilms

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    #3
    Don't be put off, there's always room to learn. Look into the school and what its admissions policies are, and if you have the scores to make it. Heck, I'm a film major and I don't know what I want to do yet (maybe direct, but we'll see). You don't have to know everything before you get there.
     
  4. Rickay726 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    #4

    thanks alot, after what karpfish said i just condsidered burning my camera. but yeah im still young so you no...
     
  5. Karpfish macrumors 6502a

    Karpfish

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    #5
    Sorry if i put you down, i was just saying that if you are not truly serious about it you may not want to be there. I have heard stories of people that go there and find it is too much for them, or they simply want a more normal school. I am considering it pretty heavily too, but i am not really sure. IM only a sophmore right now, but I'm very serious about photography. My dad was the same way, so he supports me a lot with it.
     
  6. Dark macrumors regular

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    #6
    Yeah Im a Junior Too but I really want to major in Photojounalism as that would probably best suit me. Just some of my pics. Its new so im still adding to it.

    http://irace559.smugmug.com
     
  7. Rickay726 thread starter macrumors 6502

    Rickay726

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    #7

    bestfriend=showoff with his smugmug account
     
  8. Lebowski macrumors 6502

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    #8
    if you want to look into a good photojournalism school... ASU has the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism & Mass Communication. I know a few of the instructors as well as students, and it appears to be a great program.


    http://cronkite.asu.edu/
     
  9. Pistol Pete macrumors 6502a

    Pistol Pete

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  10. Dark macrumors regular

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    #10
    I believe that you can teach technique but you cant teach creativity. One must have an eye for photography, you cant teach that.
     
  11. leumluath macrumors member

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    Mar 22, 2005
    #11
    That's OK, photography school doesn't believe in you, either.

    I understand Brooks is very good. I can wholeheartedly endorse RIT (http://www.rit.edu) The University of Missouri and Ohio University were good for photojournalism at one time, but I don't know the current state of their programs. There are others.

    Leumluath
     
  12. iGary Guest

    iGary

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    #12
    Why are the majority of photographers such asshats? :confused:

    Remember - you're supposed to culture the hobby...
     
  13. Pistol Pete macrumors 6502a

    Pistol Pete

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    #13
    this is what i meant...

    go learn marketing or something...


    thanks haha...not like its only my opinion.
     
  14. pdxflint macrumors 68020

    pdxflint

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    #14
    Brooks is a good school for photography of many types, but if you want to be a photojournalist I don't think it's necessary to major in it. Personally, I think it's best to get a good, well rounded education (don't skip writing heavy classes) and go to a decent university with an active daily newspaper and get a job shooting photos, maybe writing, doing some production, and eventually you'll know what you really like and are good at. If you stick with it, you'll become an editor, perhaps photography editor, and the contacts you make as well as some of the elective courses you take will steer you in the right direction by the time you graduate. Usually as a staff member of a university daily, you'll get free-lance opportunities and learn a lot about available jobs before you graduate. Typically, most new photojournalists start at smaller weeklies or small dailies, and gradually work their way up to larger dailies, then major market dailies. It takes a lot of moving around, and the big city dailies aren't really that easy to get on board because the entrenched staffers don't leave that often, but if you're good, and smart, and can write good cutlines or short feature pieces, and have good people skills, you can work your way up. The main thing is to be flexible, hard working, use good communication skills, have a good eye for a story-telling picture, and be reliable. Finally, always make it a point to understand the story you're shooting pictures for. When you understand the subject/story, you have a far better chance of expressing it with your pictures and your cutlines (captions) and getting those shots that make the difference between average, and great. That's why getting a good education counts. Photojournalism is not all just about cameras and lenses, but it's about mastering the content of the story. Just my $0.02 worth, since I've done it. Cheers, and good luck with your choice of schools.
     
  15. Mydriasis macrumors 6502

    Mydriasis

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    #15
    I agree 100%! Whenever some youngster comes about with any interest at all they blow his dream to bits. Whats the deal? They act like they're the only one with creativity, and if your not born with a complete knowledge of everything photography you might as well quit now.

    What are they affraid of? The potential competition?

    Rickay726 if you want to go photography school, do it! If your hard working and interested you'll show up these guys in no time.


    ducks, from flying tomatos :p
     
  16. Dark macrumors regular

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    #16

    Whoah hey, don't take shots at my goals in life. I assumed you realized that when I said that...I felt like I did posses a "diamond in the ruff" eye for photography. Ive only been into photography for less than a year and I'm producing images that I feel are quite good and so do other people. Granted I'm not amazing or anything, hence why i'm going to college further my education about photography. Im not even the one who started this thread anyway.

    iGary is right. Don't be an asshat.
     
  17. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #17
    Actually, you can, and some actively do. Generally, they start with easy stuff like the rule of thirds (which hasn't changed since paintings in DaVince's time, then move on to leading elements, western and asian composition differences, negative space, etc.

    While it helps if you "just see that way," if you don't, it's teachable.

    'Cause we all want to feel special and exclusive- especially after blowing $20,000 on equipment. Don't worry though, the "creativity is in your blood and it rules uber alles" types are usually the ones who think all that learning about how to properly balance artificial light (i.e. the "I only shoot natural light!" crowd,) hyperfocal distances, proper exposure, etc. is "blocking their creativity" because "that stuff just gets in the way of my magical technique!"

    The truth is that anyone who works hard at it can produce magical images. Some folks are lucky enough to produce great images without working hard at it-- but they feel they don't have to work and they don't try to improve-- they think they're already there. Then you get the "it must be a Zeiss lens!" crowd, the "My camera is the perfect camera, any lesser camera body will produce inferior work" crowd, the "I shoot handheld and induce more error than buying a $100 lens, but with $1100 lenses, so it's ok" crowd and the "It's a big heavy lens, I couldn't possibly care enough about my work to haul that thing around!" crowd.

    Look at sites like dpreview, you'll see most of them can't shoot worth a darn, and they've overpaid for a camera they use as a point and shoot.

    There's a little bit of all of them in every photographer- it's a question of how much you work to overcome them. I don't work nearly hard enough at overcoming it most of the time, but I'm trying. Pennance is a heavy lens and a big tripod.

    Don't listen to generalized naysayers, do listen very closely to honest critiques. There are lots of mediocre photogs out there- though lots of them seem to make a good living.

    Here's some advice for you and the original poster:

    See if you can find a local pro to assist, you'll learn more from a helpful and good pro than from most other methods. You may also get the chance to play with some gear you can't afford and learn what works well for you. You'll also earn some money- then you can start threads with "as a working pro..." ;)

    Enter some contests, perhaps even the sucky ones that want rights to the pictures, though local ones are better if they're in your area. Though only do it once you *understand* what giving away those rights means.

    Look at work from people like Wesson, Adams, and all the other dead guys and gals who's work you like and a lot of those dead painters you didnt' want to learn about in history- study the use of light and shadow, composition and color.

    Oh, and if you do want to work full-time in photography take marketing, it's actually useful advice.
     
  18. jimmer116 macrumors member

    jimmer116

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    #18
    Because I feel like adding to this...

    If photography is what you want to do, by all means pursue it. Pursue it by any means you feel will fit you best. Get into a school though, that will allow you to branch off in more than ONE direction. Do NOT lock yourself into one area of study now. If you get into it and realize that, "Hey, maybe this isn't for me," for whatever reason, you have room to move at your school without dropping out or transferring (because that's a bitch). Research the hell out of your school and whatever potential career track you want to go down. Look for photojournalism job shadows. Inquire at a local photography studio about a job shadow there. Really get a feel for what you want to do. Ask established photojournalists and photographers how they got where they are and what recommendations they have--and I do mean outside of this forum.

    I'm a sophomore in college now, and I've changed my major 4 times. Being at a large school though, has allowed me room to move. But I will say that only until now, where I've found something I really want to do, it's felt worthwhile. I'm pursuing my photography interest, but in a way that (hopefully) will keep me out of the unemployment lines. Look for creative ways to implement your liking for photography. The specific program that I'm in also, as a graduation requirement, has you complete 2 "minors" (not really minors, but two 12 credit "cognates") and I'm using that to take the journalism/photojournalism (intro, pj1-2, layout/design).

    Anyway, what I'm saying is you need to give yourself room to grow and expand. Don't commit yourself to ANYTHING now. I guess I would strongly advise against locking yourself into a specific major now (so avoid schools like Brooks). You can always transfer to a specialty college later.

    RIT has been mentioned--check that out. It's a larger school with more than just one major, but has a very good (looking) photo. track. The other thing to look at, is finding a school large enough to have a decent paper or something so that you can get in and start to develop your skills in a Real World™ setting. You can never go wrong with experience. Think video games--Experience Points are all the rage.

    Finally, while a very, very crude way of going about it, check out a site like monster and look for "photojournalist" postings and "photographer" postings and see what employers are requiring for education. I'd be willing to be now, that most of them want experience over a degree.


    Hopefully I helped.
     
  19. gauchogolfer macrumors 603

    gauchogolfer

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    #19
    I'm a scientist, not a photographer, so I can't really recommend Brooks versus any other school. However, I can recommend living in Santa Barbara, since I spent almost 6 years at UCSB. It's a great town, nice beaches, friendly people, plenty of photogenic types to model for your classes :).

    Santa Barbara gets two thumbs up from me.
    :cool:
     
  20. shecky Guest

    shecky

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    #20
    actually, you cannot. the examples you cite are technique, not creativity. try another argument. you can ENHANCE creativity with technique, but you cannot train someone to be creative.
     
  21. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #21
    Creativity is applying technique in new and interesting ways. Very rarely does a successful visual image not have at least some of the "usual" elements applied to a new subject-- rarely enough that I doubt we'd find more than a handful of examples over the last 500 years of images. A Google on "teaching creativity" will give a host of infomation on programs for teaching general creativity, but in an image, even the most "creative" images rely on the usual suspects. Classes like "Creative lighting" teach the foundations of lighting technique, then show the student how to apply that basic technique to get new and interesting results. One person's creativity is another person's iteration.
     
  22. shecky Guest

    shecky

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    #22
    again, no it is not. thats iteration or possibly interpretation. any program found on google or anywhere else that promises to teach you to be creative is so patently idiotic it just proves how wrong you are by its own existence.

    the fact that people think they can learn to be creative is possibly a great reason why so much art, design and photography out there is utter excrement. :rolleyes:
     
  23. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #24
    Torrence, 1966
    Torrence, 1969
    Guildford, 1973
    Libby, 1984
    etc., etc., etc.

    There are *lots* of studies, papers and tests by educational experts that differ with your unsubstantiated opinion. The 1969 Torrence study indicates a 70% success rate in teaching creativity.

    Maybe some people thinking they're $diety's gift to creativity is the reason there's so much excrement out there. Maybe people thinking creativity excuses lack of technique is, maybe it's just that half of the stuff out there is below average.
     
  24. shecky Guest

    shecky

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    #25
    again, this very line's indications that you can somehow quantify creativity to prove that you are now 70% more creative than you were is just as ridiculous as everything else you have said. creativity is not accounting.
     

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