Bush Housing Secretary Is Under Investigation

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by IJ Reilly, May 13, 2006.

  1. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #1
    http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-hud13may13,1,4508498.story
     
  2. aristobrat macrumors G4

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    #2
    Yay, Clinton's Travelgate part 2?
     
  3. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #3
    How so?
     
  4. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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  5. Queso macrumors G4

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    #5
    We are now watching the Bush administration disintegrating. Unfortunately it looks like the USA is going to suffer two years of complete paralysis as a result.

    Is there any way under your Constitution that presidential elections can be called early? This isn't healthy for the world, let alone the USA.
     
  6. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #6
    Now that's a hell of a stretch. Maybe try comparing it to Lewinsky next time. At least that scandal had the familiar patina of illicit sex on it.
     
  7. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #7
    Amen, brother. I don't think even the most optimistic of us, watching Bush's speech about "spending his political capital" in January of 2005, expected things to fall apart as quickly, thoroughly and disastrously as they have. I can't believe it myself. On one level, it delights me. But as an American, it horrifies me. It's like watching a slow-motion 30-car auto pileup.

    You're right about that...but nope. Best that can happen is that Bush and/or Cheney are impeached and removed, which just bumps everybody else up a notch. There is no provision in the Constitution for a no-confidence vote, calling a special election, or anything like that.

    That question gets asked so often lately by non-Americans that we really ought to make it a sticky at the top of the political forum. ;)
     
  8. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #8
    Perhaps you should amend your Constitution to allow it.
     
  9. Queso macrumors G4

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    #9
    That's exactly it. Fascinating to watch, although it leaves you with feelings of horror and unease as the events unfold.

    Amend the Constitution for something this trivial? Surely only important things like Gay Marriage warrant such drastic measures?
     
  10. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #10
    Unfortunately, it's spewing wreckage all over the highway: hard for the rest of us to avoid hitting something.

    Sorry, I wasn't thinking straight.
    :eek:
     
  11. FFTT macrumors 68030

    FFTT

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    I'd prefer things to happen faster giving the guilty less time at the shredders.

    The trouble is that I can't think of anyone worthy of the office at the moment.

    The lawmakers don't want to regulate themselves out of their cushy jobs, so
    where does that leave us with finding a worthy leader.

    What a mess
     
  12. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #12
    Very punny sir. Does your wife know this? ;)
     
  13. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #13
    She thinks she knows.
     
  14. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    Comparing two Constitutional amendments that neither should nor will occur?

    The U.S. already hold a national election every two years. Presidents only serve for four years. That's more than enough politics for any country, but thank you very much for thinking of us.
     
  15. aristobrat macrumors G4

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    #15
    Sorry about that.

    The whole "Contracts may not be awarded on the basis of personal or political favoritism" part sounded somewhat similar to what I've read happened during the Travelgate thing (where people in the travel office were allegedly fired by Hillary for not giving a Clinton friend any business for the charter company he partially owned. Then a Clinton relative was put in charge of the office, and the White House stonewalled the Republican-nominated committee that was formed to investigate it).
     
  16. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #16
    The White House Travel Office employees serve at the pleasure of the president. Even congressional Republicans, who worked diligently to raise a political firestorm over the incident, focussed on the supposed "coverup" over why the staff was fired/reassigned, and the supposed involvement of Hillary Clinton, not over any illegality. At worst, this was an example of garden-variety cronyism, of the kind which is apparently a daily occurrence in the Bush administration.

    The accusations against Jackson, if they turn out to be true, are far more serious.
     
  17. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #17
    The subject has been debated, even among the liberals here, without any real consensus on whether it's a good idea.

    Plus, our Constitution is designed to make it very difficult to amend. Constitutional amendments have to be brought forth either by Congress itself or by a national convention convened via the legislatures of at least 2/3 of the states. If the amendment gets that far, then it has to be ratified by 3/4 of either the states or of the aforementioned national convention, in order to become law.

    Get 2/3 or 3/4 of the US to get together on a major Constitutional change, in this polarized atmosphere? Not a chance.
     
  18. Queso macrumors G4

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    #18
    The trouble with US elections is the campaining goes on for nearly an entire year beforehand. Over here the parties get four weeks max prior to polling day.

    Under the US system, it's amazing anyone holds their interest long enough to vote at all.
     
  19. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #19
    Often more than a year beforehand, but it depends on how you define campaigning. The political maneuvering for 2008 is already well underway. How can this be prevented? In short, it can't. Even in the UK, political speech is protected, is it not?
     
  20. Queso macrumors G4

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    #20
    Here it's pretty much confined to the news and politics programmes for most of the time, so you can avoid it easily. Our political parties are quite restricted to what they can get away with on TV, as the advertising watchdog keeps direct advertising out of commercial breaks and official Party Political Broadcasts are strictly limited as to when they can air.

    Any campaigning outside of the runup to elections happens in the newspapers. However, since anyone who buys a paper tends to go with one that has similar politics to their own it's less obtrusive, and as there are newspapers backing all major parties there's always a choice.
     
  21. aristobrat macrumors G4

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    #21
    Agreed.

    I just thought it was funny that we've gone from Clinton using cronyism to drum up business for a family friend that wasn't getting any from the White House travel office to Bush, who has a secretary who doesn't giving business to anyone who doesn't support the president.
     
  22. IJ Reilly thread starter macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #22
    I think you might have some wrong ideas about how this works in the US. The difference is less than you might imagine, the lack of restrictions on political advertising being the main point of departure. Theses restrictions would be found unconstitutional here for the most part. Still even with the next national election only six months off, we're not seeing much political advertising for it, unless it's for a primary, which is an intra-party contest. Many other events are clearly political in nature and campaign-related, but can't really be classified as campaigning.
     
  23. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #23
    I feel the same way. I don't even feel schadenfreude anymore. I'm just sad it's come to this. I hate that I can't stand those in power. I mean, we all joke about politicians, but it's not even funny anymore. Neocons seem to think we like ragging on Bush and his cronies, but I for one would be much happier if they gave me something to like about them instead of all they have done to make me hate them.

    And who would be the ones to change those laws? As has been alluded to, no one wants to legislate themselves right out of a job. Least of all those most likely to actually be a "victim" of said law.
     

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