Buying a Gun

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by carbonmotion, Feb 9, 2007.

  1. carbonmotion macrumors 6502a

    carbonmotion

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    #1
    I'm in the proccess of trying to decide between which two guns I should buy for target practice and amature competition shooting. Colt 1911 or HK Mk.23 (.45 ACP)... I do have small hands for a guy, so I want a gun that I can grip comfortably but it still large enough to be accurate. Any suggestions?
     
  2. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    #2
    As a female I've only shot a Colt 1911 once. It felt ok in my hands (me saying "as a female" would indicate I may have smaller hands). I wouldn't know what advice to give but like SilentPanda I guess I'll never be a true American. :)
     
  3. Bobdude161 macrumors 65816

    Bobdude161

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    #3
    Why don't ya get a small rifle? Just in my opinion, I like rifles alot better. Can practice at longer distances from various clock towers :p . But yes, last time I used a freind's pistol, it tore up my wrists. Don't know why, I am pretty weak.
     
  4. job macrumors 68040

    job

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  5. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #5
    Personally, I favor most of the 1911 clones, as you can do a lot of parts trade-outs. ParaOrdnance's P13 is my favorite 1911 clone, though it's not as parts-compatible as one of generic clones like a Springfield. If you're new to shooting though, a .45 isn't the best place to start, especially if you want to be accurate. Something like a Browning Buckmark .22 target pistol is cheaper, easier and will help you develop good habits. Lots of the new polymer-framed pistols are easier to care for than an all-metal pistol- but if you're set on a .45ACP, then either get a cheap one to play with like the Mauser M2, or a 1911.

    I really like the new SigSauer 1911 clones, but I haven't shot one yet. In .45 I've got an M2, a S&W 645 and a ParaOrdnance P-13. the PO is my favorite in that caliber (even though it's a Canadian gun.)
     
  6. dsnort macrumors 68000

    dsnort

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    #6
    Don't rule out Taurus or S&W. Last time I looked, ( and it's been years ) S&W had the smallest grips of any 45 ACP. And the Taurus is very well made, and you don't pay a premium for the Colt name.
     
  7. leekohler macrumors G5

    leekohler

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    #7
    I just have to say it's nice to see someone educating themselves about guns, rather than choosing to remain ignorant about them. Sounds like you've been shooting for a while. I used to shoot rifles when I was younger. I also liked archery quite a bit.
     
  8. mrsollars macrumors regular

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    Oct 30, 2006
    #8
    1911.

    start with a good base gun.....1911's allow for much more customization than the HK will.
    Also, the HK has a very thick grip. it's a solid, straight shooting gun...but no serious competitors show up with it.

    In reality, both guns are 'ABLE' to shoot straighter than you will be able to.
    1911 will just let you customize and put higher end components in it.
     
  9. Sesshi macrumors G3

    Sesshi

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  10. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #10
    You won't find many folks competing with Taurus. For a carry gun, home defense, or anything like that, they're very difficult to beat (I have four Tauruses- I'm a fan)-- they also have a lifetime warranty. But if you're trying to compete, you really want to be using what everyone else is using so that you can get replacement parts at a match.
     
  11. mrgreen4242 macrumors 601

    mrgreen4242

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    #11
    All the anti-gun people aside, I have to say that I'm not a fan of the 1911. Shot them a few times in the Army, just never liked it. I have bigger hands, and it just wasn't a comfortable gun to shoot; not sure if smaller hands would be better or not. I own several guns, and have shot dozens of styles and types of guns as a soldier and a civilian, so here's my picks:

    If you want to drop the cash and get something really nice, get a Sig. I'm partial to the SigPro, but any of them are nice.

    If you want a cheap gun to take to the range and have fun with don't listen to the intarweb folks that will tell you the Hi-Point is junk. I've got one and I love it. Everyone who's shot it likes it and is amazed when I tell them it was $100 (9mm model). I've put a good 1000 rounds through it and had maybe 1 or 2 "jams" (missfeeds, really) that were caused by a crappy 10-rd magazine I had for it. The factory standard 8-rd mag has put 600 or 700 of those 1000 through with never a problem.

    I'm not saying it's as good a gun as a Sig or a Ruger or anything. It's, though, an amazing bargain. Lifetime warranty, no questions asked - send it in and they'll fix it for you, and replace any parts that look worn while they're at it. I shoot sub 3 inch groups at the 10 yd mark, and I'm not a very good (handgun) shooter. My old man puts 5 or 6 rounds in a 2 inch pattern at 10 yds with it. We both fair a bit better when shooting something higher end, like a Sig, due to the Hi-Points only major flaw: crappy trigger pull.

    Anyways, you mentioned competition, so you're probably looking at something a little on the higher end (try the Sig), but for anyone who wants something low priced and fun to try out handgun shooting I'd recommend the Hi-Point without hesitation. They also make some carbines that are very, very well thought of for those who want a small low recoil rifle to plink with. (Odd that people seem to like the carbines and not the handguns, since they are the same mechanical parts, just different barrels and stocks).
     
  12. dsnort macrumors 68000

    dsnort

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    #12
    Well, it's true you can customize a 1911 easily, like a PC. On the other hand, a 1911 is also functionally reliable, it's controls are well layed out, intuitive, easy to use.....very Mac like! ;)
     
  13. MacsRgr8 macrumors 604

    MacsRgr8

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    #13
    Heh.... I loved my UZI when I was serving my country (conscription) back in the early nineties.

    Must admit I also had alot of fun firing the MAG and .50 too....

    But, back in civilian life, I have never fired anything but a Paintball gun :D
     
  14. Grakkle macrumors 6502a

    Grakkle

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    #14
    It's true. A good sword would be much better. Or perhaps a crossbow.
     
  15. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #15
    A Desert Eagle's action will occasionally lock up with the bolt closed if you don't hold it well against recoil. While it's *super fun* to shoot, I wouldn't rely on my DE, and it's likely to overpenetrate in most circumstances, making it less than ideal for stopping power and safety.
     
  16. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #16
    To be fair, every single US Army .45 I've seen has been of the category "no thanks, please hand me a '60 or 203." There's a wide variety of sizes for 1911s, some are better for different sized hands, and which grips you put on will change the width, and therefore how large your hands are is material in a 1911 only if you're (a) shooting a stock pistol or (b) really looking for a concealable commander-sized weapon.
     
  17. iCheese macrumors regular

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    #17
    Don't get the H&K Mark 23 for your first pistol. They cost a lot and it is a big pistol; it might be too large for your hands. A 1911 is a good pistol if you are going to only choose one. Glock makes really good pistols if you want a polymer framed one. They won't cost you too much, and they are simple to operate. Taurus is hit or miss in terms of quality. Some people love them, some people hate them.

    Someone mentioned getting a .22 target pistol for learning on. That isn't a bad idea as ammo is cheap and recoil is almost nonexistant. 9mm is very cheap too. You will be able to shoot more often if you shoot less expensive ammunition.

    Whatever you decide on, take a basic firearm safety course before you purchase.
     
  18. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #18
    Given their low rate of return on their unlimited lifetime warranty, do you have anything that substantiates a hit or miss quality? I've got one Taurus revolver and three semi-autos, they've always been more reliable than pretty-much anything other than my Lone Eagle, which has been as reliable as my Tauruses.

    I've got friends who carry Tauruses as their duty weapons, and I've had lots of friends who've owned them, mostly the PT-XX series in either 9mm Parabellum or .40 S&W. I've never seen a quality issue- the PT-9x series were manufactured originally to Beretta's standards on Beretta equipment on an Argentinian military contract. They're parts-interchangable with the older Beretta units, so tolerances are tight enough.

    I'm curious...
     
  19. iCheese macrumors regular

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    #19
    This is anecdotal evidence from other people's experiences. If you are happy with yours, then cool :)

    I heard that their older stuff had most of the problems, but newer guns have been better.
     
  20. saunders45 macrumors 6502a

    saunders45

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    #20
    I've been considering getting a rifle or handgun myself. I used to target shoot with my Grandpa when i was younger in the 90's back in Nebraska. He had a bunch of older guns, including a couple Mauser K98s, a 1903 springfield, an SKS, and a Garand. He passed away last year down here in Tampa, but he got rid of all of his guns before moving down here in 2000. My finace is very anti-gun, even though her dad has owned guns in the past. Her Grandpa was even with the 101st Airborne, and jumped at Normandy, Holland, and fought at Bastogne as a member of the 501st or 506th, I can't remember.

    Anyways, I told her I was going a gun to start target shooting again, or a Harley. She picks neither, but it's still something that I would love to start doing again. I've shot .22s galore, but would prefer something with a little more weight to it. As a history buff, I would love a WWII replica, but I really don't know much about searching/purchasing than what I read. Any suggestions?
     
  21. killr_b macrumors 6502a

    killr_b

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    #21
    Ooooo, I like guns.

    I'm currently waiting on the XD .45 ACP from Springfield Armory.
    1911's are nice too, but this is about half the weight (empty clip) at only 30 Oz.
    Nothin' says American better than a .45 made in the USA. :D

    Check out the XD on Springfield Armory's website:
    http://www.springfield-armory.com/xd.php

    Remember: Once you have a gun NEVER draw it in anger. And never draw it if you aren't 100% decided that the person you point it at needs to die this second.
    Guns are not toys.:cool:

    Peace out
     
  22. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #22
    In general, replicas aren't going to be as reliable, easy to maintain and easy to shoot as a modern firearm. The 1911 was used from WWII onward without too many changes- but what has been changed is for the better.

    That said, Auto-ordnance makes WWII model 1911's and Thompson machine gun clones, as well as an M1 carbine clone.

    Really though, if you're serious about the GF, you need to sit down and discuss this before you get anything. If she's not comfortable with a firearm in the house, then you either need to find a way to make her comfortable (training, safe, ammo storage...) or not go down the road.
     
  23. saunders45 macrumors 6502a

    saunders45

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    #23
    I'll Check them out, thanks.

    She's slowly coming around to the idea. We are getting married on March 23rd, and she is absolutely my best friend. I think it is mostly an issue of her concern for my safety. Before I moved to Florida in '01, I was all about sports, paintball, snowboarding, and even target shooting with my grandpa before he moved. Since I've moved here, It's been harder to do those things with work and college and getting married. So me wanting to start up some of these hobbies again is foreign to her.
     
  24. compuwar macrumors 601

    compuwar

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    #24
    If she's gun shy, then I'd advise getting her internal *and* external ear protection before going to a range, and either getting or renting a .22 or something manageable for her to start with if she's willing to try it. Most women I've shot with are extra-sensitive to the noise and recoil.

    Best of luck!
     
  25. WildCowboy Administrator/Editor

    WildCowboy

    Staff Member

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    #25
    Moderator Note: Let's keep the pro-gun/anti-gun discussion out of this. It's been done many times and always ends up in the political forum. Let's keep this thread focused on the OP's point, please.
     

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