Buying Advice: Windows a must

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by macaddicted, Apr 15, 2006.

  1. macaddicted macrumors regular

    macaddicted

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    Down on Copperline...
    #1
    I am running a uniform shop and we just purchased an embroidery machine. I have experience running design and graphics software so I insisted that we get the top notch design software for the machine. Unfortunately it is only available as a Windows application.

    The software comes in two parts, one program sets up the design and one program runs the machine. The manufacturer's rep recommends running them on separate systems. Being a longtime Mac user I am loathe to purchase a WinTel box. I am also doing almost all the advertising and sign design our shop. I can get a copy of Adobe CS2 at student rates (I am also finishing a degree) so getting windows software is not too much of an issue. I have been using boot camp successfully for my QuickBooks software (Accounting and Point-of-Sale) on my iMac for working at home.

    The reality is that this particular system will probably run Windows most of the time, but I do not want to lose the ability to switch to Macintosh when I want or feel I need to. I would prefer to spend as little time in Windows as possible, and am even willing to pay the penalty of dual booting if I must.

    I am looking for advice from the community. I have little experience with Windows having been a Mac user for over 15 years. Is it better to go with an inexpensive Dell (you have no idea how hard typing that sentence was) or try using a Mac?
     
  2. balamw Moderator

    balamw

    Staff Member

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    #2
    Check out some similar questions in another recent thread.

    http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=194012

    For you, however, as a Mac convert, it might make more sense for at least one of those machines to be a Mac mini Core Solo if at all possible so you can dual boot. Think about whic of the two machines you will actually sit at more than the other (my guess is the design one and not the one that runs the machine) and make that one a Mac.

    B
     
  3. cait-sith macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2004
    Location:
    canada
    #3
    Danger!

    Windows on Mac is ___NOT___ officially supported by anyone. You will not get any help if your application fails. This is very bad if your business is depending on this. Check with your Vendor -- they will likely not help you with any issues that arise.

    Specialized software that talks to embedded / control hardware can be quirky too.

    Save your receipt. ;):D
     
  4. localnet macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2006
    #4
    Which platform?

    I have been using Macs for around 15 years, but had to purchase a couple of PCs for my business when I expanded. No transportation software for the Mac, just like your business. But yours is a bit different then mine, my PCs are not controlling anything, mine are simple data entry, any old thing will do the job for myself.

    In your case, I would go with a custom, locally built PC, and run XP PRO SP2 on it. When I say custom built, I mean one that will run your machines, and that is it. Strip all of the crap off of Windows, and keep it off of the internet. You should have someone locally that can build you a rock solid PC with QUALITY components and SUPPORT it if things go haywire. You do not want to be calling India in the middle of a big production run if things go tits up on you. Trust me on that.

    Get a dedicated Mac for the rest of the operation. Just my .02

    Mike
     
  5. CanadaRAM macrumors G5

    CanadaRAM

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    On the Left Coast - Victoria BC Canada
    #5
    Here is the word on the Educational version Adobe software

    "Student question

    "I'm very interested in buying the Education version of Adobe Creative Suite, but first I want to know if the software can be used to produce work for paying customers once I am working in the industry, or do I have to buy a different version of Creative Suite once I'm working in the industry?”
    Answer

    Good news! You can use Adobe Education software (any title!) to produce commercial/professional paid-for work when you leave school, or even while you are in school. In this regard, Adobe does not limit how student software is used. So students can use it to learn and to make money!

    (Of course, students must agree to the terms of the End User Licensing Agreement — which appears during installation — just as every software customer must do.)"

    The License agreement says: "Notwithstanding the foregoing, you may not transfer Education, Pre-release or Not-for-resale versions of the software."

    So it is legitimate for you to use your own copy of Adobe software for commercial purposes, but it remains yours and cannot be sold to the business. If you leave, the software has to leave too.
     
  6. Whistleway macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2005
    #6
    Are you talking about modelling software like TransCAD/Cube or logistics software?
     
  7. localnet macrumors newbie

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    Apr 15, 2006
    #7
    Whistleway

    Logistics software, mainly a mileage/payroll/routing program and some other program I suddenly cannot remember. Been a long week!

    Mike
     
  8. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #8
    So you need 2 machines, one for the design and one to run the machine. You already have an Intel iMac for the designs (and it already runs Quicken through Boot Camp), so you need another machine, either a WinPC or another Intel Mac, right?

    If I were you, I'd get the cheapest Dell possible and use that to run the machine. Who cares WHAT you use to run the machine. Don't connect it to the internet and do your everyday stuff on your iMac.

    If you're planning to use OS X on this machine as well, and will do things like surf the net and do all the things you'd normally use a machine for, then get a Mac Mini Core Solo. I say you only need one of these if you're planning to ever connect to the internet, but whatever.
     
  9. macaddicted thread starter macrumors regular

    macaddicted

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    #9
    DesignShop Pro+. It's embroidery software.
     
  10. macaddicted thread starter macrumors regular

    macaddicted

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    #10
    I was insufficiently clear. I have a Dell already for running the machine. What I need is a system for doing the setup and converting files from regular graphics (.eps, .jpg) to embroidery specific files. My iMac is my home system, which I need there for other tasks. What I am not sure of is whether I would be better served buying a Windows or Mac computer for my design/setup system.
     
  11. macaddicted thread starter macrumors regular

    macaddicted

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    #11
    Thanks for the advice. I am going to try running it on my iMac before I purchase a system. I guess I have been lucky so far as I haven't had any problems with boot camp. Lastly, there is no way my partners will spring for a Mac, so if I do this I will have to buy it myself. Oh well, having another mac isn't that bad. :p :D
     
  12. FFTT macrumors 68030

    FFTT

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    #12
    If you already have a licensed Windows version of Adobe software, there's really no need to buy the education version for your Mac.

    Simple contact Adobe and transfer your CS2 license to a Mac version.

    AFAIK, you might have to pay a nominal shipping fee for the OSX version CD.

    I think your office may be better off using Apple Remote Desktop to allow your Mac to connect to a Windows server that is running your production
    software.
     
  13. generik macrumors 601

    generik

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    #13
    Why not buy a used and cheap PC and use that as a sort of permanent driver for your sewing machines? Then you can use your Mac for the design phase.
     
  14. matticus008 macrumors 68040

    matticus008

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    Bay Area, CA
    #14
    Don't be silly. Application support is not going to be affected by the brand of PC you run.

    And specialized software connecting to specialized hardware over USB (as I assume this is) is indeed quirky, but there would be no difference between an iMac and a Dell PC. The quirk is with the software in the context of Windows. Any computer that runs Windows is equivalent at the application level.

    To the OP, since you're looking for a control computer, there's no reason to get something more expensive than the $399 Dell special of the week unless you intend to use it for something beyond running your embroidery software. You've gotten some sound advice in this thread.
     
  15. macaddicted thread starter macrumors regular

    macaddicted

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    #15
    I'm sorry, I wasn't clear. I have a Dell for controlling the machine. My iMac is my home system, not something I want to take to my shop. I'm looking for a system to run the design software, which is Windows based. I thought maybe I could save some considerable money by buying a PC laptop. A system that I would be as confident as a Mac (like Lenovo) is nearly as expensive.
     
  16. matticus008 macrumors 68040

    matticus008

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    #16
    I guess I still don't understand. You already have a Mac, and you already have a PC connected to the embroidery machine running Windows. You're saying you need a new computer for the shop, one which can run the design software you need? If that's the case, there's still no need or point in spending the money on a Mac when any computer will do.
     
  17. discoforce macrumors 6502a

    discoforce

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    Vermont, USA
    #17
    Best advice here. It will cost more than the Dell, but it'll save you a world of heartache, because someone down the road can come fix it when it has a problem.

    Plus, if you get the mac you've implied that your partners won't pay for it. I'm guessing that also means that if ANYTHING goes wrong at your shop, the mac YOU bought will be blamed. EVERY time. How much cooler would it be that when it fails on the pc you get to say, "Gee, my iMac at home just works.TM"

    They'll be begging you to order than an iMac soon enough. :D
     
  18. macaddicted thread starter macrumors regular

    macaddicted

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    #18
    Thanks to all for your advice. I am sorry I was not clear about what I had and what I thought I might need from the beginning. I am probably going to go the PC route for now. :mad:

    Thanks again.
     
  19. Stridder44 macrumors 68040

    Stridder44

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    #19
    I love going back to these old threads and seeing posts like this, then looking into the now and being able to say "Hey! It doesnt have to be that way after all :)"
     

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