Buying Intel Mac What to do with the Old G4?

Discussion in 'PowerPC Macs' started by BruDaniell, Sep 24, 2012.

  1. BruDaniell, Sep 24, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2012

    macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    #1
    How to utilize my old G4 as resource for my Mac Mini?

    I have an Intel based iMac and a third generation iPad...they perform excellently. My old G4 has been a back room extra machine, but can't run newer software as it only goes up to 10.4.11.

    I have several programs that won't run on it because the software companies only support Apple in the Intel based world. One of the programs monitors blood work for example. I am considering a Mac Mini for the ability to run the newer software, but what to do with the old G4? It has 10.4.11, 1.5 SDRAM, 1.2 Ghz, and has the old Superdrive (remember when 100 Mg was a big deal?), firewire, etc.

    Is there a way to just daisy chain the G4 to the Mini? I hate to just scrap it.

    Is it easy to hook up, and configure?

    Suggestions would be appreciated!
     
  2. macrumors G4

    flopticalcube

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    In the velcro closure of America's Hat
    #2
    There is this $29 program that can make your old G4 (I assume it has a screen) act as a monitor for the mini. You will need a proper monitor to set the mini up. To be honest, the money would be better spent on a proper monitor and sell the G4 on eBay.
     
  3. orestes1984, Sep 24, 2012
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2012

    macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Location:
    Australia
    #3
    Being a G4, your Mac can run OS X 10.5.8 by using Xpostfacto, or Leopard Assist. You could use it as I do with my G5 as a server, put in a SATAII controller and load up some drives and then have it serve all your itunes content to your iDevices/Apple TV provided you don't have an iphone 5.

    If you wanted to just use it as a file server you could even run itunes 10.7 on the Mini as your itunes server with the content on your G4s drives. They are surprisingly versatile machines for the purpose, it doesn't need to be able to read the content, it just has to store it.

    My torrents are automatically downloaded to my server, it does time machine backups, stores all my data, Virtual Box images and can run a few tasks here in there in the background by using screen sharing built into OS X that allows me to see its desktop on my MacBook.
     
  4. macrumors 6502

    Davy.Shalom

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2008
    #4

    He doesn't need Leopard assist since his G4 is a 1.2 GHz, and the minimum requirement for Leopard is 867 MHz.
     
  5. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Location:
    Australia
    #5
    Sorry, my bad its 2am here I didnt think it through.
     
  6. thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 26, 2009
    #6
    Easy to Configure?


    Since I will be using it as a resource for the Mini, is it just one cable (which one) and easy to configure?
     
  7. macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    #7
    I think the two suggestions I have seen so far here only require the mac to be connected to your network. I am not sure what mac you have but if it can do gigabit ethernet I would suggest using that for home file sharing.
     
  8. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Location:
    Australia
    #8
    If you're going to use it for file sharing all you need is a Gigbait ethernet cable and a router (Cable/Fibre/ADSL) then you can set up everything I suggested by turning on the sharing options, and setting your Macs network system preferences to DHCP with a fixed IP address in the IP range of your network so it's always up.

    If you want to do torrents its as simple as setting up transmission with the web interface turned on, then you can add torrents to automatically download directly to your server.

    If you want more drives and more modern drives then you will need a Mac compatible SATAII controller which can be bought on ebay cheaply enough. You will then have all the data storage you need for your home in one secure location.
     
  9. macrumors 6502a

    alexreich

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2011
    #9
    Host files on your G4. That's what I did with my old Sawtooth until I got a PowerMac G5.
     
  10. macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2005
    Location:
    Australia
    #10
    You can even host files for intel macs... that's the thing with a server, it doesn't have to be able to read the content on it.
     
  11. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2014
    #11
    What does the SATAII controller do exactly? Is it a difficult install?
     
  12. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2010
    #12
    It is a card, that you stick in a PowerMac. (no iMac, macmini, etc.)

    It is something like this http://www.ebay.de/itm/Silicon-Imag.../271544275248?ssPageName=ADME:B:WNARL:DE:1123
    (not bootable, means you can only put data and applications on it, but not start your computer up, from a drive connected to this card. So you will have additional storage, but keep the OS on your old drive.)
    This one is cheap and you need to install a driver that you can find one the internet, or just go here http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1749179 (as you will read there, user xtempo had issues first, so I don't guarantee, that it works. I have another card and you can basically use every SATA card that has a SIL3124 or SIL3132 chip)

    The other options are bootable cards by Sonnet, Firmtek/Seritek or ACARD, but they go for 25-60EUR (don't know the US prives, but they should be similar)
     

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