Bypass admin password?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by LggN, May 27, 2011.

  1. LggN
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    macrumors newbie

    LggN

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    May 10, 2011
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    Georgia
    #1
    I cannot install anything on my computer because my dad put restrictions on it. I can install things, only if I had the password. I did some googling, and I found this:

    Is this safe? I do not want to mess my mac up, because if my dad finds out I was trying to create a new account to install stuff, I will be screwed. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Xavier
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    macrumors 68020

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    #2
    Your dad probably put the password on the computer for a reason.

    Why not just ask him to install whatever software you need to have installed?

    This command "tricks" your computer into thinking that it has never been run before. It will run through the initial setup that every new Mac owner does when first using the computer.

    If you run this, it will run through the set up and there will be another account with administrator access.
     
  3. LggN
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    thread starter macrumors newbie

    LggN

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    #3
    I understand. Well could this cause any damage to my mac?
     
  4. Finch7
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    macrumors newbie

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    #4
    Always a chance that you will need to do a clean install and backup to fix a problem. If you have a time machine backup, ultimately everything is reversible.
     
  5. Arthur Livings
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    macrumors newbie

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    #5
    I'm on a school issued computer and I want to get past the administrator password. I want to know if you tried this and if it had an effect on any of the other users/settings or if everything remained the same.
     
  6. pdjudd
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    macrumors 601

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    #6
    I would not recommend you do this in hardware that is not owned by you. Bypassing security restrictions is probably not something they allow you to do.
     
  7. Arthur Livings
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    macrumors newbie

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    #8
    Okay, then if I try it on my family's Mac and get rid of my mom's restrictions, would it cause any of problems that I listed earlier?
     
  8. old-wiz
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    macrumors G3

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    #9
    You should be prepared to deal with your family if you wreck it. I doubt mom will be happy if you screw up a $1000+ laptop so you can play more games.
     
  9. PresidentMike
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    PresidentMike

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    #10
    I know this thread is 5 years old at this point, and the problem, and possibly the computer itself, are most likely dead and gone. But as i stumbled across it and cant help but laugh at it, I should point out that none of the advice above is even remotely educated. Not even for 2011. Mac has a built in password reset feature with every copy of OSX. even found the appropriate link:

    http://www.cnet.com/how-to/reset-bypass-password-mac-macbook/

    People please, don't just answer to answer, answer if you know what your talking about...

    This is NOT a new fix, college instructor taught us this back in '07
     
  10. Weaselboy
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    macrumors Core

    Weaselboy

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    Jan 23, 2005
    #11
    Wow... way to be rude with your first post. :rolleyes:

    It does seem it is you who does not know what you are talking about here. The password reset method you linked only works on Macs that have a recovery partition, and the first Macs to have a recovery partition would be those that came with OS X 10.7 Lion, which was released in July 2011. So you obviously were not taught this method in 2007.

    Pre Lion Macs used one of the two methods already linked in this thread (posts #1 and #7) to get around an admin password. Post #1 describes how to make a new admin account and post #7 describes how to boot from the installer DVD to reset an admin password.
     
  11. DeltaMac
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    macrumors 601

    DeltaMac

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    #12
    Weaselboy is accurate - as usual.
    The "fix" from PresidentMike did not exist in that form "back in '07"

    And, school-owned Macs will often have a firmware password set, so booting to another partition or drive won't be possible without that firmware password. It cannot be bypassed by normal processes, without the correct password - unless you get Apple's help, which would require you to prove that you own that Mac.
     
  12. gnasher729
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    macrumors G5

    gnasher729

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    #13
    Well, it could cause you enormous problems if your mom found out. If anything goes wrong with the computer, then you'd have a real problem.
     
  13. komatsu
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    macrumors regular

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    Sep 19, 2010
    #14
    wow, this is an old thread. The OP has probably left home at this stage!

    Anyway, from my experience the solution of President Mike will only work SOMETIMES - other times
    you will still need a OS X installation medium (DVD, or USB drive) to reset password.
     
  14. DeltaMac
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    DeltaMac

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    #15
    Although there would be security implications here, the more relevant issue is access to a system that you own.
    If you can prove ownership, Apple can clear a firmware (EFI) password for the owner, if a firmware password has been enabled.
    This is not in any way related to the current issues about encrypted drives, etc.

    It takes very little knowledge to find out how to reset an admin password, which has existed virtually since the beginning of OS X, some 15 years ago.

    And that is NOT what this thread is about.

    The OP is long gone from 5 years ago, and likely is no longer concerned about parental control - which was the original issue. Ultimately, if someone does not allow you full control over a computer that you don't own, then we can't usually do more than provide hints or suggestions.
     
  15. komatsu
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    macrumors regular

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    #16
    Can Apple do this remotely then?
     
  16. DeltaMac
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    DeltaMac

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    #17
    No.
    If it is a firmware password that is forgotten - you take the Mac to Apple, along with proof of ownership.
    Then, this is the process - or similar.
    They call a support number at Apple, who has the tech run a terminal routine that reports a code.
    That code is given to Apple. Apple performs a routine on that code, which outputs a reset code.
    That result is entered in to your Mac, resetting the firmware password.
    Or, it may be performed at a secured Apple tech site, and may not require human interaction to get the reset code.
    Still requires a trip to an Apple store, or Apple Authorized Service Provider.

    That's not exactly what happens, but is pretty close to the firmware reset procedure.
    It is not a remote reset.
     
  17. Weaselboy
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    macrumors Core

    Weaselboy

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    #18
    Yeah... like DM said, you are going to have to physically take it in. The process is described below from this article.

     
  18. throAU
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    throAU

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  19. Xavier
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    macrumors 68020

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    #20
    As i remember, the original post was about an administrator user having control over the system and subsequent basic users that were unable to install software without administrator access. It was not that the administrator account was forgotten, but simply the basic user wanted admin privileges. The command line quoted in the original post at the time would preform the initial setup function that every Mac does when creating a brand new user. Because it is a brand new user, and the computer thinks it is the only one, as it should at "first start up" it is granted administrator privileges.

    The basic user would then have the basic account and a new administrator account. The basic user could then use that administrator account to grant administrator access to the basic account, and then delete the newly created administrator account. That command line "work around" has been public knowledge since at least 2004. Probably earlier.

    I think the general home user doesn't set a firmware password, but it is a good idea.
     
  20. ardchoille50
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    ardchoille50

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    #21
    I'm thinking that, if your dad placed restrictions on it, it really isn't your computer. I wonder, when you're old enough to have children, what restrictions you will place on them because you wil have the accrued the wisdom to foresee things they cannot see.

    Perhaps, instead of trying to bypass your father's wishes, simply concede the fact that he may know more than you and you should abide by his wishes.

    Just a thought.
     
  21. Gav2k
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    macrumors demi-god

    Gav2k

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    #22
    Wow we're still grave digging in this one.

    Providing it's not got a firmware password enabled it's one command line to reset the password. So very simple.
     
  22. DeltaMac
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    macrumors 601

    DeltaMac

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    #23
    Although I agree with your answer, the OP is from 2011.
    I bet OP is old enough to have children by now... :D
     
  23. ardchoille50
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    macrumors 65816

    ardchoille50

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    #24
    Oh, thank you for pointing that out. I hadn't noticed.
     

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