c++ -> mac apps

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by synthetickittie, Nov 12, 2003.

  1. synthetickittie macrumors regular

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    #1
    I have no idear how to make any visual apps for windows or mac. I want to take what I know from c++ and make a visual mac program(something that doesnt just use the terminal). If I have to learn cocoa(which I have no clue about yet) or what ever I will. Just tell me the best book or something of the likes to learn how to take what I know from c++ and learn how to make visual apps for the mac without having to read over tons of stuff that is exactly the same as the stuff I have learned in c++..
     
  2. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #2
    Maybe you should go to Apple's developer site and check on Carbon. It's not built on C++ but C and can be used easily with C++.

    There is a lot more to building even a simple GUI application in contrast to scrolling text applications, so you'll probably want to read a lot of code examples first.
     
  3. madamimadam macrumors 65816

    madamimadam

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    Jan 3, 2002
    #3
    I hope you have a copy of the Apple Developer Tools. They are available as a download from developer.apple.com but BIG download. Many machines shipped with them and Panther box sets certainly have them.

    Apple's Project Builder is fantastic... esp for something that is free. Programs like CodeWarrior are debatedly better than Project Builder but I've never had any problems with Apple's free offerings.

    And, yes, Cocoa uses Objective-C

    bousozoku, why do you recommend Carbon over Cocoa???
     
  4. Tim Flynn macrumors regular

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    #4
    Another idea is to look at realBasic.
    It's a RAD tool (Rapid Application Development) that ports to windows and Linux soon.
    I wish a company would do something just like realBasic, but use Pascal as a language.
     
  5. synthetickittie thread starter macrumors regular

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    #5
    Yes I have xcode and had been using develop tools for a few months now but all I have been using it for is for the gcc compiler with c++ which I could of just been using the terminal for.

    What is the difference between object-c and just c? Im thinking about buying a book today that I can read in my spear time in between class work. Anyone have any good recommendations. And so there is no way to just use c++ plus interface-builder to make an app? Lastly from going from c++ to either carbon or cocoa which would be the easier and better road?
     
  6. yamabushi macrumors 65816

    yamabushi

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    Oct 6, 2003
    #6
    Carbon might be easier but Cocoa would be better.
     
  7. caveman_uk Guest

    caveman_uk

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    #7
    If you want to use straight C++ then Carbon is the framework to use as although it's a C framework it works better with C++ than cocoa. If writing from scratch (and you're willing to learn objective C) then Cocoa's best as it gives a lot more 'for free'. Neither is hugely better than the other performance-wise and lots of current apps are written in either. There's quite a bit of prejudice that states that cocoa is much better than carbon because somehow it's more 'native'. This is BS.

    I'd say it is easier to start a new app in Cocoa though.

    Objective-C is an object orientated extension to C. It's a lot simpler and adds far fewer keywords to the language. Personally I find objective C a lot easier to read,write and understand than C++ - which makes my head hurt:rolleyes: :rolleyes:
     
  8. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #8
    I recommended Carbon because Cocoa is so radically different a mindframe, due to Objective-C. Had he been studying Java, I would have recommended Cocoa instead.

    TimFlynn:

    Someone did before REALBasic was around...it's called Borland Delphi.
     
  9. Tim Flynn macrumors regular

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    #9
    Exactly ! Delphi only targets windows.
    Kylix is Delphi + Builder for Linux
    Neither targets OS X
    RealBasic targets OS X, Mac OS, windows & in the future Linux, but source code is BASIC.
    So what I want is a multi-platform RAD tool, ie "realPascal" or "realC++" or "realObjectiveC".
     
  10. bousozoku Moderator emeritus

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    #10
    There were a couple front end designers back during System 7 days for C and Object Pascal, but I don't think anyone saw the future.

    The only truly multi-platform RAD tool right now is Macromedia Flash Professional. Laugh, if you must, but Flash targets the greatest number of systems. Flash Pro has forms-based development and finally has ECMA-adherent JavaScript (ActionScript) which is quick. You still need the Flash Player but it's an alternative to Java that better than average in many ways.

    Besides, who wants to write Pascal these days? ;)
     
  11. madamimadam macrumors 65816

    madamimadam

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    #11
    Interesting..... I'm a Java programmer myself so at least it'll be easier for me if I want to move to "standard" app programing
     
  12. Nicky G macrumors 6502a

    Nicky G

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    #12
    There are two books O'Reilly has out now you should check out on this subject.

    Building Cocoa Applications: A Step-by-Step Guide

    Learning Cocoa with Objective-C

    For the second one, make sure you are getting the 2nd edition and not just "Learning Cocoa," which apparently was very different and kind of really blew.

    I myself am getting way into O'Reilly's online tech book service Safari http://safari.oreilly.com. Access to a tremendous amount of solid tech resources at a very reasonable cost. Pretty much most titles you would want are available through it. I'm learning C at the moment, and then plan on going directly into Cocoa and Objective C. The value of the Developer's Tools that Apple just gives away for free... Good stuff!
     
  13. simX macrumors 6502a

    simX

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    #13
    If you want to delve into Objective-C (which I highly recommend if you have C++ experience), then I would recommend Aaron Hilleglass' book called "Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X". It is a fantastic book, and it's great for helping you grasp the concept of object-oriented programming in the context of the Mac OS X developer tools.

    The only downside is that it's currently written for Project/Interface Builder, not xCode. But as long as you can ignore the Project Builder-specific stuff, it's a winner.
     
  14. Nicky G macrumors 6502a

    Nicky G

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    #14
    Have any books been released yet that do teach Xcode?
     
  15. simX macrumors 6502a

    simX

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    #15
    I kind of doubt it. I'll wager that Aaron Hilleglass will release an updated edition of his book to work with xCode, though.
     

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