cable modem speed

Discussion in 'General Mac Discussion' started by Doghin, Dec 23, 2003.

  1. Doghin macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2003
    #1
    Can someone tell me why my macs connection speed to the net is so slow... I have a cable modem that is supposed to be giving me a high speed connection and when connected to a pc it does, but when connected to my mac it is slow.

    Please e-mail me with thoughts about this at

    Tanis_Halfelvan@Hotmail.com

    Thank you for your help.

    Darron
     
  2. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2003
    Location:
    Colly-fornia
    #2
    What kind of mac versus what kind of pc? My 1Ghz TiBook is pretty quick on the net, while my 180Mhz Performa 6400 lags like molasses in winter.
     
  3. Doghin thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2003
    #3
    All I know is that it is a 300 mhz powerpc g3... It isn't actually my computer I am more of a pc person but the person who owns it doesn't know anything about computers. She asked me to try and find out... It is my pc that I am trying it with though and my pc is a pentium 4 processor.

    Now according to the cable provider we are running at 100mbps which is the fastest speed they deal with.

    Any help you can give on this would be great, thanks

    Darron
     
  4. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    Apr 24, 2003
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    #4
    Well I hate to tell ya, but a 300Mhz processor is gonna go pretty slow even if it has a pile of RAM. Go look under the apple menu at the top left corner of the screen and see what it says under "About this Mac" That will tell you your OS version, processor speed (which you know already) and how much RAM.

    I can pretty much guarantee you the problem isn't with your modem.
     
  5. Doghin thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2003
    #5
    Ok the only thing I was able to see that could be like it was "Apple system profiler" I checked in there and under the memory overview it states the following...

    disk cache: 6.84mb
    Virtual memory 250mb
    built-in memory 128mb pc100-322s

    video memory 4mb
    backside L2 cache 512k


    Let me guess it is the lack of a good Mac thats doing it.

    Thanks for all this help...


    Darron
     
  6. Hemingray macrumors 68030

    Hemingray

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    Location:
    Ha ha haaa!
    #6
    Sounds like a B/W G3. Is she running OS 9 or OS X? That right there will make a significant difference in loading time, but I would at the very least get 256MB of RAM in there either way. If she's running OS 9, try and get her to convert to 10.3, stick 256MB of RAM in there, and she should see a moderate decrease in webpage rendering time. Like mactastic said, it's most likely the speed of the computer and not the cable speed that's bogging things down.
     
  7. Doghin thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2003
    #7
    Thanks for all your help...


    She is running os 9 and I have suggested to her before that she needs to upgrade and move with the times, but she keeps saying that she wants to stick to what she already knows.... She refuses to believe that there is a chance that os x is going to be relativly the same as os 9 just a better version.

    I will let her know though and believe me it is a weight off my mind now I can show her that I wasn't the only one thinking that it was her computer!!!

    Again thanks for all your help...

    Darron
     
  8. crazzyeddie macrumors 68030

    crazzyeddie

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    Dec 7, 2002
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    #8
    WHAT?! 100mbps!?!? I would LOVE to see the bandwidth results that confirm that... since most cable modems are only capable of 42mbps, which is still about 30 times what most users get over cable.
     
  9. Hemingray macrumors 68030

    Hemingray

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    #9
    Heh, now technically 100mbps is 100 MILLIbits per second. So 100 mbps would be one-tenth of a bit per second. :p You mean 100 Mbps? m=milli, M=mega.

    And if you mean, 100 MEGAbits per second, that's impossible, considering a T1 is only about 1.5 Mbps! The closest to 100 Mbps would be an OC-3 connection!

    Maybe you meant 100 Kbps??? Or maybe you were referring to 100 Mbps as 100 base-T ethernet. But either way, I guarantee 100 Mbps isn't her connection speed...
     
  10. Makosuke macrumors 603

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    Aug 15, 2001
    Location:
    The Cool Part of CA, USA
    #10
    No, he probably wasn't wrong when he said 100Mbps; I wouldn't be at all surprised if the connection to the modem was with 100Mbit ethernet, in which case that's probably what the cable company will call it, regardless of what the speed actually is.

    And just because a T1 is 1.5Mbps doesn't mean cable can't get faster. Case in point: I have Cox@Home, and I routinely get 3.2Mbps real-world speeds, even before you take network overhead into account. Speeds like that aren't at all unusual for DSL and cable providers, and I've seen plenty of deals for 10+ Mbps DSL in Japan and Korea, so I wouldn't be surprised if there are US cable companies offering similar theoretical maximum speeds, even if you never actually get near that.

    Even though I'm getting way more than double what a T1 can provide, it's cheap because it's not guaranteed bandwidth like with a T1; if a lot of people in my area are sucking up bandwidth, I get less than that. If few are, I get most of what's available, hence major speeds. Same goes for nearly all DSL and cable connections.

    As for the original issue, I concurr that it's more likely the computer than the connection.
     
  11. King Cobra macrumors 603

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2002
    #11
    It's true. 100Mbps cable/DLS/[whatever you want to call it] is out there. I know someone online, who uses it, but I can barely keep up with what he says.

    But, seriously, 100Mbps speed does exist: It's about 12.5MB/s speed. I wouldn't be surprised if that was a maximum speed, though, since connection bogs/multiple connections distribute those speeds. The more connections, the more you're gonna suffer.

    As for specifically the Mac vs. PC issue with speed, try doing a knowledge base search from http://www.info.apple.com/ or on their forums. I'm saying this instead of something more directly because I don't deal with high speed connections much.
     
  12. Hemingray macrumors 68030

    Hemingray

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    #12
  13. GraphicUmp macrumors member

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    Sep 29, 2002
    Location:
    Mid Atlantic
    #13
    Actually, with 4MB of VRAM, it sounds like she has a BEIGE G3 (minitower or desktop), not a B&W (which came standard with 16MB of VRAM).

    The Beige G3 only has 10BT Ethernet built-in; the B&W has 10/100BT.

    Try a 10/100BT ethernet pci card instead of the built-in 10BT ethernet. And upgrade the RAM.
     
  14. coopdog macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2002
    Location:
    The Great Midwest
    #14
    Holy **** an OC-255!!! That would be, orgasm :D. What K/sec would that be!?! Best carracho server ever! EDIT: Would it really be 1652 megs/sec?!

    The Pentagon has 2 OC-3 just to give you an idea how fast an OC-255 would be.
     
  15. OutThere macrumors 603

    OutThere

    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2002
    Location:
    NYC
    #15
    Once you break through a T3 (45 Mbit) there really won't be much of a speed jump, since you'll be able to pull in around 6 MB per second. There will be a lot of bottlenecks at that point, in hardware, software and the connections of the servers you are downloading from. The pentagon has to have dual OC-3s so that everyone in the pentagon could, theoretically, be able to be downloading stuff to the full extent of their hardware. The OCs are generally used for long spans across the country or across the ocean, and to provide internet access to the ISPs. The really high bandwidth lines will let lots of traffic through at once, all going really fast, since no computer nowadays could even touch the raw power of an OC-255 (or even an OC-12 for that matter).

    I have noticed a beige G3 have some serious trouble rendering web pages quickly. Watch out for ISPs as well, they can be rather sketchy.
     
  16. 5300cs macrumors 68000

    5300cs

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    Nov 24, 2002
    Location:
    japan
    #16
    In Japan you can get 100 Mbps ADSL through NTT. Apparently it uses fiber optic cable and therefore has almost no drop in speed.

    I don't use it, so I can't be sure though.
     
  17. Hemingray macrumors 68030

    Hemingray

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    #17
    Good catch, I didn't notice the VRAM specs. All I saw was the PC100 RAM and immediately figured it was a B/W since the beige was only PC66.
     

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