Can Apple Put a Hurting On Microsoft?

Discussion in 'MacBytes.com News Discussion' started by MacBytes, Jul 28, 2005.

  1. macrumors bot

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    #1
  2. macrumors 68030

    BenRoethig

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    #2
    Not unless they're willing to take a risk and license the OS.
     
  3. macrumors member

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    #3
    A risk that will kill Apple in the process.
     
  4. macrumors 68030

    BenRoethig

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    #4
    Says who? I think we need to stop living in 1995 here and realize Apple is in the strongest position its been in since the Mac was introduced.
     
  5. macrumors member

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    #5
    Yeah, and you're just assuming that millions of Windows users will just decide to cough up a few hundred dollars on an operating system the most barely even know about.

    Apple's hardware sales will dive because those who were going to purchase a Mac machine will now buy a $500 Dell and the Mac OS. To say alive, you'd need exponentially more sales of OS X -- millions and millions of copies -- for Apple to stay afloat. It won't happen. Apple makes its money on hardware, and as soon as it loses that, it's out of business.
     
  6. macrumors regular

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    #6
    My favorite quote ""so that "a printer driver that crashes isn't going to crash the OS as well".""

    Hahahahahahahahaha, that cracks me up. Welcome to the new age of computing Windows Users. :p
    I use windows xp everyday and never had a problem like that but still, hahahahahaha.
     
  7. iDM
    macrumors 6502a

    iDM

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    #7
    People fear what they don't know, i for one have heard windows users say "i don't like apples there so hard to use, and i don't wanna have to learn all over again." This is why Apple is going to have such a hard time.
     
  8. macrumors regular

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    #8
    Why would they do that instead of buying a $500 Mac Mini that includes the Mac OS?
     
  9. macrumors 68030

    BenRoethig

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    #9
    And Apple quality. Lets face it, if you want a quality system you're looking at Apple prices whatever you buy.
     
  10. macrumors 68040

    shamino

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    #10
    They chose a bad example for a software company that was once great and is now gone. Word Perfect fits the bill, but there's a better example.

    Ashton-Tate.

    How many people remember the dBase line of database products? In the late 80's, dBase-III was the program. Anybody who didn't need the huge power of mainframe-based database packages was using dBase. It was so popular that several other companies started making dBase clones and compilers.

    But now dBase is gone and so is Ashton-Tate.

    So what happened? dBase IV happened. This program was very late (over two years by my estimate), very bloated and it crashed a lot. They bet the farm to develop a sequel to their flagship product, and when it finally shipped, their customers all decided to stick with the old version or move to a competitor.

    Although it's far too early to tell, I could see Microsoft making this mistake. Longhorn (now Vista) is many years too late, and MS keeps on dropping features from it. And the hardware requirements are steeper than WinXP (and are not getting shallower as they drop features). If it ends up unstable or otherwise useless, it will hurt them badly. Maybe not enough to kill the company, but enough to drive lots of customers elsewhere (even if that elsewhere is older versions of Windows.) And it would set the stage where a second stinker could kill them.
     
  11. macrumors member

    tpatricks

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    #11
    Great example...

    Excellent example. Just excellent. I cut my computer teeth on dBaseII on an Osborne 1. Those are known as the 'green dot' days as that's about all you'd get when firing up dBaseII on CP/M.

    We all looked forward to dBaseIV. It needed an IV alright. By the time it finally hit the streets many of us doing DBs in those days were on to other products. Anyone remember MicroRim's "R Base?" Or, "Framework?"

    Microsoft's in a similar position, though I don't think the market will change as quickly as it did for Ashton-Tate in those days. Still, there are leaks in the dike and Microsoft is bleeding (to mix a few apt metaphors), and Apple's in the best position, probably EVER, to capitalize on an opportunity.

    Go Google. Go OS X. Go LAMP.
     
  12. macrumors 68000

    pubwvj

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    #12
    You are right in that Apple would never be able to keep up with the demand if they had a huge market share. No one company can. Apple has enough difficulty producing enough machines for their 35,000,000 current customers.
     
  13. macrumors G5

    nagromme

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    #13
    There's the key right there for sure. When people are faced with Vista it means:

    a) Learning something new (maybe not that new--but we're talking about people fearing change)

    and b) Probably needing a new computer.

    If both of those are true anyway... then why not try OS X instead? So in that sense I see the release of Longhorn actually helping Mac sales in some cases.
     

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