Can AT&T run 20 Blackberries per iPhone 3G?

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by DR'O', Sep 26, 2008.

  1. macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2008
    #1
    Is this true...?

    "The analyst quoted in the story, Peter Misek, of Canaccord Adams, theorizes that AT&T can run 20 Blackberries on its network for each iPhone 3G, due to the fact that the iPhone 3G “lacks the data compression technology that is a hallmark of Blackberry devices,” and that AT&T could have to spend up to $1 billion to bring its 3G network up-to-speed."

    http://blogs.zdnet.com/gadgetreviews/?p=363
     
  2. TEG
    macrumors 604

    TEG

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2002
    Location:
    Langley, Washington
  3. macrumors member

    kyrow123

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2007
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    #3
    I tend to agree with The General. When I had my Blackberry I rarely ever used the internet browser since it was God awful. Now with my iPhone, I can not stay off the browser (always something to look at and read while on the T or what not).
     
  4. macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    #4
    Hmm, someone seems awfully focused on faecal matters. Is it really that hard to imagine that NOT using compression (like anyone else) is making a 3G cell phone into a bandwidth hog?
    Actually, even AT&T have admitted that the iPhone is a bandwidth hog. Well, not in those words, but still.
     
  5. macrumors 6502a

    neesh0

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    Sep 6, 2008
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    Toronto, Ontario
  6. macrumors G4

    Small White Car

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #6
    I've never owned a Blackberry, but I can easily see that I use the internet on my iPhone WAY more than my Blackberry-toting friends.

    So the statement seems accurate to me. Among all you who are saying you don't believe it, do you really know Blackberry people who spend a lot of time on the web? (Outside of news sites and e-mail and stuff like that.) They always seem to be doing e-mail and text messages.

    I'm always using Google maps and downloading lol-cats and streaming music and watching YouTube. Seems to be more data than e-mail, wouldn't you say?
     
  7. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    #7
    I think it's a bandwidth hog compared to other devices, but only because it makes using lots of bandwidth simple and elegant. I had 3G phones before, but never used anywhere close to the same bandwidth simply because I had no compelling reason to do so. I doubt data compression had anything to do with it in my case.
     
  8. macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    #8
    I don't think it's untrue that the people who buy iPhones spend a lot of time on the web. But when you combine that with a phone which doesn't use compressed data, the extra useage is amplified, if that makes sense?
     
  9. macrumors regular

    bdorpetzl

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Location:
    Port Washington, Wisconsin - Boats and Beer . . .
    #9
    Was this referring to 20 BB Bolds or 20 Curves/other Edge BBs? I have a hard time believing that AT&T has enough Bolds in the wild right now to accurately gauge the impact of a 3G BB, data compression or no data compression.
     
  10. macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    #10
    Makes perfect sense to me. I just don't know if it's true. Also, it wouldn't surprise me if BB compress emails as text is easily compressed. However, data that is already compressed, such as JPEGs, audio streams, video streams, etc. aren't easily compressed further, so that may have some additional bearing on the BB compression vs. iPhone compression. People tend to view more non-compressible data with the iPhone, I'm guessing.
     
  11. macrumors G4

    Small White Car

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Location:
    Washington DC
    #11
    I think what they mean is 'regular sites' vs. 'mobile sites.' With my iPhone I tend to skip the mobile version (which contains less graphics) and go for the full site. Do Blackberry owners look at the mobile-sites more? I dunno, but I'd bet they do.
     
  12. macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    May 16, 2006
    #12
    It is true that the traditional Blackberry web browser experience is fed through an intermediate proxy that compresses the data. HTML Web pages are converted into a format similar to WAP Binary XML (sometimes distorting the original appearance of the web page), and scripts are compiled into a bytecode form. Images are automatically transcoded to PNG and downsized to fit the Blackberry's default display resolution.

    But Blackberry's own documentation claims that one would expect a size savings of only around 50% to 75% due to these optimizations. That would only account for 2 to 4 compressed Blackberry web pages for every single uncompressed page - this figure is quite a bit less than the quoted 20 Blackberries for every 1 iPhone.

    I think the bulk of the difference would likely be due to a more pleasant user experience on the iPhone leading to a higher overall demand for viewing web pages.
     
  13. macrumors 6502a

    ryanwarsaw

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2007
    #13

    That makes sense to me.
     

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