Can Someone Translate this?

Discussion in 'Community' started by JesseJames, Jun 4, 2004.

  1. JesseJames macrumors 6502a

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    #1
    The first is Latin: Et In Arcadia Ego

    Next is German: Sie mussen schlafen aber Ich muss tanzen.
     
  2. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

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    #2
  3. Veldek macrumors 68000

    Veldek

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    #3
    The German text can also be translated to: You must sleep but I must dance, where you means a person you're not familiar with.
     
  4. medea macrumors 68030

    medea

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    #4
    The phrase "Et In Arcadia Ego" means something along the lines of "Even in Arcadia I exist," where I is thought to mean death and Arcadia is a reference to a paradise or Paradise itself so even in paradise death exists....
     
  5. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

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  6. SilentPanda Moderator emeritus

    SilentPanda

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    #6
    My German is terribly rusty so I only ask this in an inquisitive sense...

    Can it be translated that way if the verb is conjugated as it is?
     
  7. AmigoMac macrumors 68020

    AmigoMac

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    #7
    You must sleep but I must dance...

    Viele Grüße aus Deutschland ;)
     
  8. Veldek macrumors 68000

    Veldek

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    #8
    Yes, it can. You can only distinguish between those sentences from context and the spelling respectively. If the S in "Sie" is a capital S, then it's the polite singular from, if it's a small s, then it's the plural. At the beginning of the sentence, the S is always capital, so you cannot say what is meant unless you know the context.

    In German, the third person plural is used as the polite form for the second person singular. Someone you don't know is addressed to with "Sie". When you get to know him better, you start to use the "du". Only children are always addressed to with "du".
     
  9. leo macrumors member

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    #9
    <nitpicking>
    To avoid confusion for the ambitious student... the spelling is not perfectly correct.

    It should be

    Sie müssen schlafen, aber ich muss tanzen.

    Note the umlaut, the comma and "ich" in lower case.
    </nitpicking>

    :)
     

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