Can the 1GHz iMac handle Final Cut?

Discussion in 'Macintosh Computers' started by zdank420, Feb 18, 2003.

  1. zdank420 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2003
    #1
    Would the new iMac have enough horsepower to use Final Cut efficiently? Some of my DV video individual captures are 10+ minutes in length, equaling Gigs of space just for a single scene. Then consider many of these scenes that need to be sliced, diced, and combined. Is this strictly Power Mac territory?
     
  2. MrMacMan macrumors 604

    MrMacMan

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    #3
    Wow. Now I'm confused...

    It should be able to handle it but eventually you will run out of space. It will not run very fast, but hey 1 GHZ is pretty speedy still.
     
  3. drastik macrumors 6502a

    drastik

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    #4
    It will run fine, the only time problem will be long renders of big effects. Of course, if you have alot of effects, your piece probably looks tacky anyway (less is more folks.) Otherwise, it'll work fine. I'd pump up the RAm and maybe get a faster Hard Drive, but even that not neccesary. With a slow Hd, you might drop some frames in Capture now, but if you log and batch capture, you should be all right.
     
  4. Bear macrumors G3

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    #5
    Re: Can the 1GHz iMac handle Final Cut?

    This all depends on what you mean by handle and efficiently.

    Can it handle it? Yes.
    Will it be efficient? That depends on your definition, although I suspect not from what you've described as your workload.

    With an iMac, you're going to wind up with a bunch of firewire harddrives attached to get enough disk space for the movies you're working on.

    With a PowerMac, you'll be able to get 4 drives internally. Also, you'll be able to get more ram (which may or may not be an issue). And if you still need more disk space, you can go with firewire drives, or if this is for a business, you can spring for the Xserver RAID to attach to the PowerMac.

    Oh, you can get firewire drive boxes that hold multiple drives to cut down on the external wiring clutter if you do need that extra space.
     
  5. Swinny macrumors regular

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    Jul 12, 2002
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    Oxford, UK
    #6
    It can handle the software just fine (at least, mine is cool with FC Express)...the real issue is going to be storage and the amount of effects you apply

    ...lack of L3 cache and single processor means it will run out of steam after a while on the RT effects.

    ...and as previously mentioned, that amount of storage on firewire drives will be slower and very expensive.
     
  6. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #7
    While an iMac isn't the best option it can handle FCP. DV is about 12gigs/hour so with an 80gig external HDD you'd get at least 5hrs of storage space (I say 5 because after drives get more than 75% full they could start slowing down and dropping frames).

    If you are going to be using FCP on a regular basis I'd suggest getting a PM. If not, and if you are on a really tight budget, you can get by w/a iMac.


    Lethal
     
  7. fleetwood macrumors newbie

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    Menomonee Falls, WI.
    #8
    Would the new iMac have enough horsepower to use Final Cut efficiently?

    No!
    It's not the machine for the job.
    Like the others have noted, the reason is lack of the L3 cache
    and the HD speed and size.
    You would be better off with a dual 867.
     
  8. Mr. Anderson Moderator emeritus

    Mr. Anderson

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    VA
    #9
    It all depends on what you wanted to do. I've used FCP on a 450Mhz Sawtooth and managed before. Also depends on how much time you want to wait around for it to finish rendering.

    D
     
  9. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #10
    Re: Would the new iMac have enough horsepower to use Final Cut efficiently?


    HDD size and speed is not an issue. No matter what he buys he'll need to buy a seperate HDD to store the media.


    Lethal
     
  10. fleetwood macrumors newbie

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    Menomonee Falls, WI.
    #11
    HDD size and speed is not an issue. No matter what he buys he'll need to buy a sepera

    Right.
    Which he can't do with the Imac. Only an external firewire
    which is not the best way to go for video.
    My customers that are into video are buying the
    newer HD's with the 8MB cache. this is the best option for video.
    The Powermac will support over 400GB inside.
     
  11. trebblekicked macrumors 6502a

    trebblekicked

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    Chicago, IL, USA
    #12
    Re: Re: Would the new iMac have enough horsepower to use Final Cut efficiently?

    That's kind of true. HD speed certainly matters, but i'm not sure what drives are in the imac. so long as they are ata66/5400rpm or better, you'll be fine. do not try to capture directly to a firewire HD. the seek time on a firewire drive is too high. capture to yr primary drive, move clips over to FW. even if you have a 7200 RPM FW drive and a 5400 RPM internal, it's better to capture internal.

    i can't recomend a specific FW HD now. i bought a lacie 80GB last month, and fried the FW bridge three days ago. Lost 65 GB of backup.

    BTW- the kids that made Project: Valkyrie cut the whole thing on an imac. an old school, imac, no less.
     
  12. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    Los Angeles
    #13
    Re: HDD size and speed is not an issue. No matter what he buys he'll need to buy a sepera


    For DV a quality FW HDD will handle the media as well as a quality interal drive will.


    Lethal

    EDIT: Capturing or working w/video on the same HDD the OS and apps are on is a bad idea. That is the best way to drop frames.
     
  13. fleetwood macrumors newbie

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    Menomonee Falls, WI.
    #14
    The firewire problem

    My thought on this is... well this.
    By the time you buy your firewire hard drives you could have just bought a Power mac with higher performance and expanability.
    Sure you can do video editing on an Imac.
    But you can also do it on a PC.
    The reality is that you won't find a knowledgable professional out there that would choose to do video editing on an Imac.
    It's simply not the machine for the job. And in the the end after buying your large and expensive firewire HD's. You could have bought cheaper and higher performing HD's that are made to work with video. And are found in Apples new RAID box
    120GB ATA/100 8MB Cache $175.00
    120GB lower performing Firewire $260.00 ( this is a cheap one)

    Do it right the first time.
     
  14. iGav macrumors G3

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    Mar 9, 2002
    #15
    It zooms on a TiBook 1GHz with 1024MB RAM....

    Positively zooms..... :D
     
  15. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    Los Angeles
    #16
    Re: The firewire problem

    Fleetwood you have a point. If you are setting up an FCP workstation a PM is the only way to go. But FCP can work off an iMac or a laptop. And for DV video (which is what he's working with) any current, quality HDD will work perfectly (internal or external).


    Lethal
     
  16. fleetwood macrumors newbie

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    Menomonee Falls, WI.
    #17
    Any Mac can do anything.
    I think that you just need to look at whats inportant for you.
    I love the Imac, my own personal feeling is that Video is about as intensive a workload that you can put on a machine.
    A 56k modem will do a fine job of giving you access to the internet. But is that all you want or need... access?
    How about how much time you are going to spend watching a page load?
    The powerbook will out perform an Imac beacuse of the L3 cache.
    But the dual processors will crank through video.
     
  17. trebblekicked macrumors 6502a

    trebblekicked

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    Location:
    Chicago, IL, USA
    #18
    couldn't agree more. personally, i wouldn't try to set up an imac to work specifically on video. With video, you need to replace hard drives with some degree of regularity, you want maximum PCI slots for RT cards, you want dual monitor support, dual processors, higher speed busses, L3, etc etc etc.

    All of these things make working with video much easier, but they are neither inexpensive nor necessary. If you all you do is cut DV footage; an imac and FCP or even FCE will do fine. IF you do any compositing, 3D, animation, SDI/analog, even DVD authoring, you need the extra power and expandibility of the PM.
     
  18. DHagan4755 macrumors 6502a

    DHagan4755

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    Location:
    Massachusetts
    #19
    Let's face facts:

    The requirements for Final Cut Pro are:
    From Apple's Final Cut pro site.

    Now obviously, if Final Cut Pro 3 will run on a Power Mac G3 at 300 MHz with 256 MB RAM on OS 9.2, then it will surely run fine on a 1GHz 17-inch iMac.

    Final Cut Pro will even work on the white G3 iBook.

    Disk speed is a factor limited only to iBooks and PowerBooks; and, of course, older Power Mac G3 platinum towers. Generally a 5,400 RPM drive or faster is sufficient for DV capture and editing. The new 17-inch iMac has a 7,200 RPM drive.

    The question is not whether the application will work okay -- it will work fine...but how long do you want to wait for the rendering? Keys, intensive wipes and DVE work will require extensive rendering.

    Additonally, as has been mentioned, DV consumes a lot of drive space and you're likely better served by a PowerMac. Even if you can only afford the new 1GHz Power Mac model, you would later be able to add more hard drives and even add other capabilities to which the iMac limits you.

    If you're doing this for casual editing sort of a hobby for home videos, get the imac and Final Cut Express. If you're going to use the system to break-in to the video biz...get the iMac and full-blown version of Final Cut. But! if you're doing this professionally, get the PowerMac and try to get the dual model if possible.
     
  19. gernb macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2002
    #20
    Give the guy a break...just because an iMac isn't the most elegant solution for editing with Final Cut doesn't mean it isn't a solution.

    And for the few of you who urged avoiding firewire drives for capture, you have no idea what you're talking about. I've been using lacie drives for almost four years with final cut and I HAVEN'T DROPPED A SINGLE FRAME.
     
  20. giovanni macrumors regular

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    Jul 1, 2002
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    manhattan
    #21
    fleet what drives are you talking about ? the 120gb that can be bought at apple are $349 !!!
     
  21. FelixDerKater macrumors 68000

    FelixDerKater

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    Apr 12, 2002
    #22
    Will it work? Absolutely. I have used it on a PowerMac G4 533MHz. It worked fine, but extra speed is always welcome. As long as you have a good amount of RAM and a fast hard drive, it will work "efficiently".
     
  22. Wano macrumors 6502

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    Oct 23, 2002
    #23
    My uncle was in the commercial industry, he made a few commercials and also done some other film projects. He used a PC before he discovered macs, and now he has an iBook and a 800mhz 17" iMac, and he says the iMac is perfect for editing.
    http://www.macsolutions.com/homepage.html here is a link to a 120gb firewire hard drive with 8mb buffer.
     
  23. Apple][Forever macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2002
    #24
    Yes.

    I use an old G3 with a 600MHz G4 ZIF, 768MB RAM, and an internal 80GB HDD (WD SE) and an external 80GB Firewire drive with no problems (dropped frames during capture, etc.)

    This machine has a slower G4, slower bus speed, and slower video than a new iMac.

    Rendering most things takes about 5x realtime for the effects I use (mostly picture-in-picture stuff for DVD menus and simple transitions. I have fancy video effects, I would only use them if working on a project that required special effects in the story itself).

    If you already have the iMac, go for it. If you don't, I would consider a PM for 2 reasons:

    1. because in the end it will be cheaper (FW HD cases cost $90-100 a piece, hard drives are $100-150. For the same cost, you could almost double the available room.)

    2. if you ever need to move to a hardware solution for video editing, a PM will accept PCI cards, whereas an iMac will not.

    Just make sure if you go the FW route to get a drive case that has an Oxford 911 chipset. Granite Digital is the best, I have heard. Not having the money, I bought a cheaper OWC case, which I have had no problems with.
     
  24. Bear macrumors G3

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    Sol III - Terra
    #25
    Actually the US Apple Store price for the LaCie 120GB drive is $269. Also, some of the other brands of FireWire drives are less expensive. And some are more expensive, but the most expensive on Apple's website is $299 (US).
     

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