cant delete some files - help

Discussion in 'Mac Help/Tips' started by Bob Dobbs, Oct 29, 2002.

  1. Bob Dobbs macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    California
    #1
    I keep trying to de;ete a few files (old 'save as' Photoshop files that I dont need anymore). When I try and move them to the Trash it says

    "The item "moon.tif" cannot be moved to the Trash because it can not be deleted"

    What up with that? Its only a tiff file nothingthe system uses. Same thing happens on a few PDF files I made for printing tests.

    Help?

    Also I tried the DockExtender app - did not like it so tried the 'uninstall' script that came with it to no avail - so I just found all the associated files and threw them in the trash, but it still shows up in the OTHER section of the system prefs - how do I ditch it?

    Thanks in advance (OS 10.2.1 new windy dual gig)
     
  2. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #2
    Try opening a terminal window, use 'cd' to change into the directory with the file you want to scrap and type:

    sudo rm -f NameOfFileToDelete

    Good luck!
     
  3. Bob Dobbs thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    California
    #3
    ummmm - OSX newb

    "us the cd" - what?
    is there not an easy way to do it - should I just boot into 9.2.2?
     
  4. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #4
    Re: ummmm - OSX newb

    Ok, to make it simpler can you tell us where the file is that you want to trash? Then we can tell you what to type.
    E.g. /YourUserName/Pictures/moon.tif
    Or, yes, your other option would be to boot into OS9 or login to OSX as root....but that's a whole other story.
     
  5. Bob Dobbs thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    California
    #5
    OK here is the info...

    when i open my hard drive - the files are all right there along with the Applications, Applications (OS9), Desktop, System, System (OS9) and so on.

    I've heard about the "root level" how do I log on to that? would I need to do that in order to get rid of the DockExtender in the System Prefs?
     
  6. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2002
    Location:
    London, England
    #6
    Sorry to be blunt, but, it sounds like you have absolutely no idea what you are doing in the terminal, so I think it's probably better we don't go down that road, 'sudo rm -f' can cause serious damage if not used carefully, also by the sounds of things logging in as root could be dangerous to, it's probably best you boot into OS9 to scrap the file your having trouble with, as for the thing in system prefs, I have no idea, can anyone else help out here?
     
  7. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #7
    The Terminal window is quick and effective, but not the safest method for deleting an uncooperative file. So, when deleting files in the Terminal application, it is smart to check carefully that you are deleting the file you intend to, in the correct folder. There is no UNDO. You've heard the warnings.

    Rather than try to do the correct cd command and retype the filename, you can type

    sudo rm -f

    with a trailing space but without pressing return. Then drag the icon of the file you want to delete to the Terminal window. The folder path and filename should be filled in, e.g.,

    sudo rm -f ...path-to-folder.../filename

    In the Terminal window, see that the folder and filename look right and, if so, press return.

    The reason you can't delete the file is probably that you are not the file owner and don't have permission to delete it under Mac OS X. If so, other methods can also be used and would be safer: You can use Mac OS 9. Or you can try changing the permissions on the file in the Get Info window. Or, if you use more than one login name and the file is owned by one of them, log in as the user who owns the file and you should then be able to delete it.
     
  8. Vector macrumors 6502a

    Vector

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2002
    #8
    1. Go into the terminal (Applications/ Utilities)
    2. type rm
    3. hit the space bar
    4. drag the file onto the terminal window
    5. press enter

    The file should now be deleted

    You do not need to use 'cd' or '-f'

    If these files are photoshop files that you created under your user then you should onyl have to type 'rm' then a space and then drag the file onto the terminal window. If it were a file owned by the root then you would have to use 'sudo' and type in a root user password which you have most likely not set up.
     
  9. Bob Dobbs thread starter macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2002
    Location:
    California
    #9
    hmmm - I just did it in OS9

    much easier (for me)... but I still dont understand something... I am the ONLY user, this is my mac. How would I log in as a higher power than what I am now.

    Sorry - but yes I am a total OSX newb
     
  10. Doctor Q Administrator

    Doctor Q

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2002
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    #10
    There are three types of users: regular users, administrators, and superusers.

    Regular users have access to their own files and user-specific preferences, like their desktop pattern.

    Administrators have the powers of regular users, plus control over system-wide settings, such as the options for the login screen. You pick the name of the first (usually only) administrator when you install Mac OS X, so that's the name you are probably using all the time if you have a one-person Mac.

    Superusers can do anything, which lets them fix almost any problem (if they know what they are doing) or destroy the system with an ill-advised command (if they don't know what they are doing). There is usually only a single superuser, named root. By default, Mac OS X doesn't let you log in as root. See Mac OS X: About the root User and How to Enable It from Apple's Knowledge Base for the steps to enable root login.

    On the rare occasion when you need superuser powers, you can log in as root, or you can use the sudo command in the Terminal application (which lets you perform a single command as a superuser) or you can use the su command (which lets you perform any number of commands as a superuser, until you type exit or close the Terminal window). In all cases when you have to be superuser, you should work carefully and go back to being an administrator or regular user as soon as you are done.
     

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