Card says president sees America as a child needing a parent

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by zimv20, Sep 4, 2004.

  1. zimv20 macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #1
    link

    i started working at 11 years old, was supporting myself at 18, and put myself through college (w/ no financial help from reagan's administration, thankyouverymuch).

    this jackass didn't even get sober until he was 40. and he sees himself as my paternal protector? what a condescending ****head.
     
  2. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    Wonder if there will be any spin on this in the coming days...

    After reading the article I became amused at the Administration using the "BECAUSE I SAID SO..." line of reasoning and defense for any of it's initiatives...

    Curious as to what GW's concept of a parent entails...
     
  3. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #3
    Who needs spin if the media barely reports the remark?
     
  4. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

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    #4
    I see this remark as just more religious (Christian) symbolism, invisible/unnoteworthy to all of us non-believers but loaded with meaning for the Christian voters amongst us...
     
  5. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #5
    Oddly enough, I caught sarcastic flak from kuyu for making a similar assertion a few days ago:

    kuyu, what do you think now that Card appears to share my views?
     
  6. ~kilroy~ macrumors newbie

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    #6
    Sounds like the Republicans are stealing from the Democrats on this one.
    That has always been an underlining theme of the Democrats( We will take care of you: aka We know whats best for you). Remember "It takes a village".

    Sickens me coming from either side of the aisle.
     
  7. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #7
    Seems to me that a helluva lot of people want just that: A Big Nanny to take care of and provide for them.

    Remember the guy who stood up at one of the Clinton/Bush I debates and commented that the President was the figurative father-image for us all, as he led into his question?

    Question: Is it really bad for any President to have somewhat of a view that his job has similarities with a shepherd and the flock?

    'Rat
     
  8. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    I don't know what that means exactly, but this isn't what Card said anyway. He suggested the President holds a parent-child view of the relationship between himself and the nation. You know, authoritarian, seeing no need to explain, etc.? What a startling admission for anyone in the administration to make. Explains a lot, doesn't it?

    Now, it seems to me that this is precisely kind of government conservatives would decry -- but I've heard no criticism of this from anyone on the right. So maybe it's just the "nanny state" they're against -- a "daddy state" is just fine (so long as the "daddy" is a Republican, anyway).

    Scary stuff. Very, very scary.
     
  9. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    Hey, if Card's analogy holds true, then we've been abandoned by our parents. ;)
     
  10. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    #10
    No wonder I've been feeling like an orphan lately.
     
  11. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #11
    "...a parent-child view of the relationship between himself and the nation. You know, authoritarian, seeing no need to explain, etc.?"

    Sorry, but that's not the way I viewed my own role as a parent. Sure, I set limits on my kid, but I explained why there were limits. That's bad? That's "authoritarian" in any negative sense?

    A common belief is that we judge others by ourselves. Is that the way, IJ, you judge parenting? (Sorry, just picking on you for the helluvit. I'm in no way ready to believe that of you. There are lots of ways to interpret meanings, and I'm not quick to find negatives.)

    'Rat
     
  12. trebblekicked macrumors 6502a

    trebblekicked

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    #12
    i've often thought that we let our country get away with stuff we'd never let our kids get away with- being messy (environment), wasteful (consumerism), intolerant (racist, homophobic), a bully (foreign policy), greedy (economics), financially careless (deficit), etc etc etc.

    it'd be a good thing if we started treating the country the way we treat our children.
     
  13. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    I think you'd be better off asking why Card chose this particular analogy to explain the President's views. One thing you can't deny about the relationship between a parent and a ten-year-old, is that the parent retains complete authority to decide what's best for the child. I have an idea that you'd describe any parent who allowed a ten-year-old to make these important decisions themselves as "indulgent," if not downright "negligent."
     
  14. themadchemist macrumors 68030

    themadchemist

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    If the electorate acted a little less like a group of 10-year-olds with respect to the political process, then maybe it wouldn't tolerate being called a group of 10-year-old by a hapless political hack who's running this country into the ground and his hodgepodge crew of conservative cronies.
     
  15. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    IJ, I'd say you're right but for one thing: Seems like every time somebody says something, you find dozens of people with, "Now what did he/she mean by that?" Folks just don't like to believe that either it meant no more than what the dictionary says the words mean, or that it was some off-the-cuff comment with no particular significance.

    Comments of that sort impinge on my consciousness about as strongly as TV advertising, which exist only so that I can refill my coffee cup or make a quick trip to the bathroom.

    :), 'Rat

    PS: Danged hurricane hasn't hit south Georgia, yet, but one piddly-diddly squall put our electricity out at 4PM; didn't come back on 'til 10AM. Grump.
     
  16. Neserk macrumors 6502a

    Neserk

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    #16
    That explains how he justifies his lying.


    I would agree with Card's assessment.

    The president is a servant of the people, not a parental figure. Bush is scary.
     
  17. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #17
    Hey, don't blame Dubya for continuing the Clinton card of compassion. Dance with who brung ya...

    :D, 'Rat
     
  18. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    'Rat, every so often, we're allowed a quick peek behind the curtain of an otherwise incredibly stage-managed White House. We got one when Bush was caught off-script with the remark about the war on terror not being winnable. We got another when Card wandered off the reservation briefly with the ten-year-old analogy. What I'm saying is that we can learn a heck of a lot about the mindsets of the people in the administration during these brief, unscripted moments. These remarks are far more deserving of analysis then all of the predigested and essentially meaningless sound-bites and political pabulum we're force-fed the other 99.5% of the time.
     
  19. zimv20 thread starter macrumors 601

    zimv20

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    #19
    best. post. ever.
     
  20. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #20
    Yeah, I understand that. But it's just as easy to take a positive view as a negative view. And, frankly, I'm getting tired of unending negativity toward either Kerry or Bush.

    Positive interpretations:

    WOT: Winnable in the sense that strong, competent, well-organized groups are very much depleted of capability. Unwinnable in the sense that all manner of smaller-scale WMDs are available to hate groups of whatever sort.

    Parent/Child: Benign attitude toward people in general, with a sense of responsibility toward all facets of leadership.

    To me, the accomplishment of the goals and duties, or the potential success for accomplishment by others, is more important. Bush hasn't done all that great a job, but I don't think Kerry would do any better...NeoCons seem bent on some form of empire; the opposition thinks you can bargain with the implacable--lose/lose.

    But, yeah, armchair psychology is always fun speculation. Folks just follow preconceived notions to the desired conclusions.

    'Rat
     
  21. sorryiwasdreami macrumors 6502a

    sorryiwasdreami

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    #21
    Not sure, but underage drinking isn't part of it.
     
  22. IJ Reilly macrumors P6

    IJ Reilly

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    The implication here is that the post-facto political spin trumps the actual words which were uttered. I can't accept that premise. When Bush says that the war on terror isn't winnable after years of making speeches about winning the war on terror, it doesn't require someone with a Ph.D. in psychology to wonder out loud which position is his real view on this subject. I believe it's our duty as informed members of the electorate to ask these questions. We get too few clues about what these deeply secretive people in the White House believe to ignore (or excuse) these momentary, accidental exposures.

    I think the media needs to follow up aggressively when statements like this are made. What did you mean Mr. Card? Is this consistent your previous policy statements, Mr. President? Instead, nearly everybody, including the press, seems perfectly willing to accept the damage control, even when it doesn't stand up to much scrutiny. No wonder our political leaders get to skate so often.
     
  23. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #23
    Same as most parents, I guess: "Do as I say, don't do as I do".
     
  24. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #24
    One thing I loved about Jesse Ventura: he viewed public office as a service, to be performed humbly, then left to resume life as before.

    If only every politician were so humble and honest (they'd never be elected).
     
  25. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #25
    Perhaps some politicians have no life to go back to...
     

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