Changing Lenses

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Glenn Wolsey, Mar 13, 2006.

  1. Glenn Wolsey macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #1
    Well I was all set to buy a Digital SLR, but now I have decided to get an advanced point and shoot and make do with that while I learn photography more, as a DSLR really isn't needed at the moment.

    Though I want to change the lens so I can also use a more powerful one for sports, is that possible with any of these cameras?

    http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/webapp...10001&productId=54954&crumb=10003-10066-10073

    http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/webapp...10001&productId=54608&crumb=10003-10066-10073

    http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/webapp...10001&productId=54602&crumb=10003-10066-10073

    http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/webapp...10001&productId=60604&crumb=10003-10066-10073

    http://www.noelleeming.co.nz/webapp...10001&productId=59802&crumb=10003-10066-10073
     
  2. atari1356 macrumors 68000

    atari1356

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    #2
    You can't change lenses, but most will probably allow you to buy "conversion lenses" that attach to the end of the built-in lens. The conversion lenses will either give you a wider angle focal length, or extend the telephoto length further.

    You may consider also looking at the Canon Powershot S3 IS which will be released in a couple of months:
    http://www.dpreview.com/news/0602/06022111canons3is.asp

    I used to own the slightly older Powershot S2 IS and it was a great full-featured camera - wonderful for experimenting with manual controls, and it had some nice macro features. I sold mine to help pay for a DSLR+lenses, but I miss having it (and may even sell one of my DSLR lenses to buy an S3).

    I think you're on the right track with getting a so-called "point and shoot" camera with a long zoom first. It really gives you the opportunity to try out different types of photography at a relatively low cost. Getting the same focal range/features out of a DSLR can cost a LOT more - so it's good to get a feel for what you're getting into before shelling out a ton of cash.
     
  3. puckhead193 macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #3
    check out the nikon 8800, a bit pricey but it takes fantastic pictures. I think nikon discontinued it so you can prob find it cheap or they are prob coming out with a new version....
     
  4. Glenn Wolsey thread starter macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #4
    Can I change the lens on that?
     
  5. puckhead193 macrumors G3

    puckhead193

    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    Location:
    NY
    #5
    no its a fixed lens
     
  6. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #6

    NO!! DON'T check out the CP 8800! Why? Because Glenn has told us before that he wants to shoot a lot of sports activities and the CP 8800 will frustrate him no end. It's a wonderful camera with a beautiful lens, don't get me wrong here, but unfortunately the price one pays is that, while a VR lens and while quite a long lens, that seemingly appealing lens is very slow, especially at the long end. The 8800 also is slow to write to the memory card and invariably the photographer loses opportunities for shots due to that. Shutter lag is an issue here as well.

    The CP 8800 is a fine camera for shooting landscapes and static subjects, it has excellent macro capability, but it is just not good for anyone who wants to do any sort of action shots involving people, insects, or animals. I also found that performing many functions was more awkward or complicated than it needed to be. Case in point: manual focus. It is very tedious trying to get accurate manual focus with this camera.

    I was extremely disappointed in the CP 8800 but in the end it prodded me into going on into getting a DSLR, the D70, and that was a very good thing. I loved the D70 immediately and found that I was able to get the kinds of images that were simply not possible with the CP 8800. True, it costs more to have a DSLR because of the ever-gnawing "lens lust," but for anyone serious about photography, in my opinion, a DSLR is really the best way to go. It is a valuable learning tool and a rewarding way to enjoy photography.

    Oh -- I doubt very much that Nikon is planning to issue an upgrade to the CP 8800. They seem to be putting more and more emphasis on their P&S line and their DSLRs.
     
  7. Glenn Wolsey thread starter macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #7
    But I will be able to get a tele converter to extent the zoom to around 20X optical, correct? :)
     
  8. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #8
    Glenn: no, all of the cameras you provided links to above are "bridge" cameras, some with longer zooms than others, but all having fixed lenses that cannot be removed from the camera. In order to have any sort of flexibility with regard to being able to change lenses you will need to go with a DSLR. The DSLR comes from the heritage of Single Lens Reflex cameras, which had interchangeable lenses. At one time there were also rangefinder cameras which had interchangeable lenses as well. There is a lot of benefit to having the abiility to swap out lenses, but, yes, there is a higher cost to be paid than if someone buys one of the all-in-one fixed-lens bridge cameras.

    For those DSLR buyers who want a fairly long lens range without needing to swap out lenses frequently, there is Nikon's new 18-200 VR, which I suspect will live on many people's DSLRs and never be removed. (For samples from that lens have a look at the "Signs of Spring" thread in the picture gallery.) I love that lens, but it's not my only lens. Today, for instance, I shot the images seen in that thread, then came in the house and swapped lenses, putting on the 105mm macro lens, and went back outdoors for a go at the daffodils. (I'm not too pleased with the results so you aren't seeing those!) Tomorrow, I'll tackle the project again, having seen where I could have done better. Today was rather windy, which made it difficult, too, as I had to have a higher ISO, wider aperture and higher shutter speed than I really wanted so I wasn't able to get exactly the look I was after. I also really should have been using a tripod and I hadn't bothered...

    Anyway, IMHO you could do very well with an investment in a reasonably-priced DSLR body and the 18-200 VR lens, also adding in for not that much money, a 50mm f/1.4 or f/1.8 for shooting in ambient low light. I don't believe that you can put a TC (teleconverter) on the 18-200; that usually is reserved for lenses such as the 70-200 and the long prime lenses. The reasonably-priced 70-300 mm lens gives a bit more reach than the 18-200 VR, so that's another possibility, and in that instance you could use the kit lens which is available for the D50 or the D70, the latter being considered a better one. That particular combination of three lenses (18-55 or 18-70, 70-300 and 50 f/1.4 or f/1.8) would get you off to a good start. The 70300 can also accept teleconverters, which would give you additional length and range, but you do lose something in the amount of light coming into the lens.

    Anyway, of course it's your money and your decision, but I suspect that you'd learn much more from working with a DSLR than with a fixed-lens all-in-one bridge camera. JMHO....

    Have you read reviews on any of the cameras referenced in those links? That's obviously very important, too, as each will have its pros and cons. Also check out the forums on DPreview and Fred Miranda for those specific cameras, too.

    Good luck with this decision!
     
  9. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #9
    But if you do, your lens will be 1/1.5/2 stops slower, which means you'll have blurry images, so I wouldn't bother. I think 10-12x zoom is good enough for now. I'd be more worried about getting a lense that's "fast" at the long end. Otherwise, forget about sports photography.

    Check the f-numbers on those lenses for us and I think we'd have a better idea of which one to go for. I think this is the biggest issue.....the aperture at the longest focal range (ie: zoomed in all the way).
     
  10. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #10
    Without knowing much about the camera in question and its lens, I can tell you that you're going to have a major loss of light when slapping a teleconverter on to another lens, and this becomes a critical issue when shooting in situations such as indoor gymnasiums and sports arenas. Don't allow yourself to be swayed by the allure of the 12x, 20x zoom....it's not necessarily going to bring you the results you're thinking you'd get. Just as with megapixels not being as significant a point as many would have the customer think, when it comes to zoom length there is much more than just the actual distance one can zoom in....
     
  11. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2005
    #11
    Typically if it's a point and shoot it's not an SLR which indicates that it's probably got interchangable lenses. Just buy a nikon d50 or canon 350 and be done with it. My friend spent $1000 on the nikon 850 or whatever it was. It's awesome and has awesome features, but my nikon d70 body was about $100 more and she is already limited.
     
  12. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #12
    ^^Yeah, or don't spend more than $600 on any of these cameras, and get one later. Spending any more than $600 now, and replacing it with a D50 one year from now seems like a waste of cash if you plan on replacing your new P&S camera in one year.

    And again, a teleconverter won't help you because you'll end up with blurry photos. They don't let enough light through. Get a 10x or 12x zoom and get the one with the largest aperture when you zoom into something. That'll let the most light through, and then you'll be able to use a shorter exposure time.
     
  13. Glenn Wolsey thread starter macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #13
    Well in New Zealand I can get a "bridge" camera for $600, but the low end DSLRs are around $1800...
     
  14. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #14
    http://www.teds.com.au/www/6/1001102/displayproductcategory/1005803__1001247__.html

    Nikon D50 for around $1150 NZD.

    Or go a little "grey market" and get it from this store.

    http://www.d-d-photographics.com.au/

    They're reputable. I had a friend who bought his camera there, although it's imported from America. Yes, I realize they're both Aussie stores, but I'm sure there's a workaround somehow.

    That, and there's always eBay. I got my camera on eBay from an eBay store called "Nikon on Broadway", and they also happen to have a real brick and mortar store in Sydney. They seem quite ace.


    HOWEVER: For your situation, you probably don't need any more than the big zoom P&S cameras, because a dSLR and a fast lense with long reach would probably cost you $3000-4000 NZD or something. Again, get one with a "fast" lense/small f-number.
     
  15. TheMasin9 macrumors 6502a

    TheMasin9

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2004
    Location:
    Huber Heights, OH
    #15
    nikon d50

    i would recommend if you are going to spend 800$ go ahead and get a nikon d50 or a canon 350d. I got a deal on newegg, about 700 for the camera with an 18-55lense and 2 gig card. just an idea.
     
  16. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #16
     
  17. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #17
    I don't know the NZD/USD ratio but if you are on a budget a D50 system with a telephoto can be relatively inexpensie. I just bought a USA warenty D50 body for US$520 you can pick up one of the variable f-stop zooms for the "mid 300s". You could buy into a system for under US$1K. Sure enough for under $1K you do not get a f/2.8 constant aperture zoom with vibration reduction and silent wave motor but the lens will be _hugly_ better quality then the lens on the P&S camera and the CCD Sensor will be much better. So much better that you can crop the center part of the image and have a better result then a full frame P&S. I have a Sony and a Canon point and shoot and a Nikon D50.
    and I've notice this first hand
     
  18. ChrisA macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Location:
    Redondo Beach, California
    #18
    I don't know the NZD/USD ratio but if you are on a budget a D50 system with a telephoto can be relatively inexpensie. I just bought a USA warenty D50 body for US$520 you can pick up one of the variable f-stop zooms for the "mid 300s". You could buy into a system for under US$1K. Sure enough for under $1K you do not get a f/2.8 constant aperture zoom with vibration reduction and silent wave motor but the lens will be _hugly_ better quality then the lens on the P&S camera and the CCD Sensor will be much better. So much better that you can crop the center part of the image and have a better result then a full frame P&S. I have a Sony and a Canon point and shoot and a Nikon D50.
    and I've notice this first hand

    If the decision is between an $800 P&S or a $1000 DSLR. I'd say the DSLR is a better value. It will have a long usfull lifetime. The lens wil last a lifetime, they never become obsolete, the body maybe five years before you will want to upgrade
     
  19. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2002
    Location:
    Location Location Location
    #19
    But what's the point of buying a DSLR and a cheap telephoto if he can't take the type of photos he wants, namely "sports photography"? It's just going to be a blurry mess while they're in play. Sure, he can get photos of athletes standing around between plays, but I don't think that's what he wants.

    I'd say for him right now, a big zoom P&S would perform just as well as any DSLR with their 1st or 2nd cheapest 70-300 mm, for example. My only question would be whether one of them has a larger aperture than the rest of them? Chances are they're all the same, but you never know, I guess.
     
  20. Glenn Wolsey thread starter macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #20
    So for action sport which camera would YOU recommend in the first post? :)
     
  21. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #21
    Put yourself out of your misery, get some funds from folks, relatives, friends, take a loan and get a DSLR.
     
  22. Glenn Wolsey thread starter macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #22
    The sad thing is I have enough for a DSLR already...okay, I have enough for two because I have saved money from my job for the past 6 months.

    The thing is I would prefer to invest that money into an Intel PowerMac not the DSLR at the moment. I just want a nice camera that will perform reasonably well for nature and sports.

    And Gary, sadly my parents dont buy me any tech, or even help me out towards my tech purchases. Annoying now but at least I'm learning the value of money more and more by the day.
     
  23. iGary Guest

    iGary

    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    Randy's House
    #23
    How about a used on on Ebay?

    Don't worry, my parents made me buy all my own stuff - you'll appreciate it later.
     
  24. Glenn Wolsey thread starter macrumors 65816

    Glenn Wolsey

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    #24
    I know I will appreciate it later in life :)

    new Zealand has its own trading site just like eBay, but the people can be trusted much more...Here are two nice cameras listed, but they are still darn expensive.

    http://www.trademe.co.nz/Electronic...cameras/Over-6-megapixel/auction-50685562.htm

    http://www.trademe.co.nz/Electronic...cameras/Over-6-megapixel/auction-50239234.htm

    PS: Like the new avatar? ;)
     
  25. Clix Pix macrumors demi-goddess

    Clix Pix

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Location:
    8 miles from the Apple Store at Tysons (VA)
    #25
    The D70 sounds like a decent deal, as you'd be getting the better-quality and very decent "kit" lens as well as one which goes from 55-200 (I don't know anything about that lens, have never used it so can't speak to the quality of it. I notice it's a bit slow, though. However it would get you started because you'd have good range between the two lenses). Seller is also throwing in a 1 GB CF card, too, and that's good.

    If you were to buy this, then you would open up all sorts of opportunities later on down the road to add to your lenses. If you'd be able to spring for it immediately, as I mentioned in an earlier post, I'd strongly urge you to consider the 50mm f/1.8 or f/1.4, which can give you excellent quality for shooting under low-light conditions.

    So in this set, you'd have a lens which is 200mm; on the digital camera of course it will be affected by the crop factor of 1.5x so that it will feel as though you're actually using 300mm. I don't know whether or not that lens would accept a teleconverter to further extend the reach, but I kind of doubt it. However, once you had the D70 you would then have the opportunity to use any lens in the Nikon system, so that perhaps for sports you would be able to borrow or hire a longer telephoto lens.

    I'm addressing only the potential purchase of the Nikon D70, as I'm not a Canon user and am not as familiar with that system and their lenses, etc. I'm sure others here can help you in that regard.

    If you were to choose either of these, I suspect that you would find yourself much, much happier in the long run than if you were to buy a bridge P&S camera.

    Keep us posted!

    ETA: almost forgot -- squinting at the new avatar, trying to decipher what it might be and am at a loss. OK, what IS it?!
     

Share This Page