CHILL THE F**K OUT PEOPLE...

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by blackfox, Nov 3, 2004.

  1. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #1
    OK, it is the day after the Election and people's emotions are high. But Jesus Christ people, try and keep some perspective...the sky is not falling and the character of many recent posts had just been deplorable. Be willing to lose gracefully. I am a Liberal, but still, to read some of the posts this morning by my brethren seems to imply some of the reasons we lost in the first place. I do not like Bush or modern conservative policy. Evidently many people do, and they won. Deal with it. Constructively.

    No-one needs post to this thread necessarily, I am just a little annoyed is all. Get a grip people.
     
  2. jackieonasses macrumors 6502a

    jackieonasses

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    #2
    I was about to post the EXACT same thing. If Kerry would of won, I would of respected him as Commander-In-Chief. Some people can't do that/
     
  3. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #3
    But doesn't this reflect how intense the divisiveness has gotten?

    You didn't used to get this kind of talk after an election. You do now. What's different? We're moving farther apart from each other. And that's why you get talk of secession, or people moving out.

    I think the frustration is so high that people need to vent it. As long as they don't get abusive.
     
  4. zelmo macrumors 603

    zelmo

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    #4
    I think it is fantastic that so many people care so much about the US that they feel this passionately about the election results. I also recognize that a lot of the emotion we are seeing on the boards today is a natural venting of pent-up anger, disappointment, outrage, and shock over what many believe are some truly unfathomable results.
    While some will never "get over" the results of November 2nd, most will come to grips with the reality that has been dealt, and seek to find a way to make it work over the next four years.
     
  5. Backtothemac macrumors 601

    Backtothemac

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    #5
    I agree, and I don't think these posts show the division. Posts like blackfox's show the division, gracefully and intelligently.

    The other fodder that is getting thrown around is from those that don't understand how to accept loss.

    As a republican, I am happy, however, I will say that Kerry fought a very tough campaign, and I have respect for him, and his family.

    At 1 am I was fully prepared to swear loyalty to President John Kerry.
     
  6. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #6
    But why on earth would you do this if he and his government are not what you want???? I don't understand it...AT ALL. And why should anyone who didn't want Bush & Co suddenly start to respect Bush & Co, there's absolutely NO REASON why they should.
     
  7. jadam macrumors 6502a

    jadam

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    #7
    Because he IS our commander in chief.
     
  8. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #8
    You don't have to LIKE it but you have to accept it. Not you specifically, but Americans generally.
     
  9. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #9
    ...and...??? :confused:

    They're politicians, just because slightly more than half the population likes them doesn't mean the people who don't suddenly have to.

    I don't have any political beliefs, but I do know that I don't want Michael Howard and his cronies in charge over here, so I might be tempted to vote else where just to keep him out. Now, if he was to then win, I'd still think he's a prick, and because we are in a free county, I'd bloody well be able to say so, and there'd be no expectation for me to suddenly develop respect for him simply because he'd be our commander.

    Honestly, I don't understand you people.
     
  10. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #10
    As time passes maybe, but, accepting the fact that the guy is in charge again, doesn't mean that anyone should have to respect him simply because he's the chief. It's not the friggin military.
     
  11. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #11
    We could always draft all the registered Democrats, then they'd have to respect him. :p
     
  12. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #12
    Don't joke...you never know :eek: :p
     
  13. Mr_Ed macrumors 6502

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    #13
    Not trying to be negative or insulting here, just an observation. I think your reaction illustrates a basic lack of understanding of the American psyche on the part of observers overseas. As corny and ideological as it may sound, most Americans will, at the end of the day, make some kind of an attempt to "come together" as Americans, not just as "Republicans" or "Democrats." This does not mean that those that disagree will give whomever is in charge a "blank check" to do as they please, but most will try to be constructive in whatever way they can and they will do so "for the good of the nation." The sense that Americans "stand together" often outweighs political differences at home, and public opinion overseas. As I said, I know all of that stuff sounds "corny," but I think you would be amazed to find how much the average American in the farm, or factory floor actually believes in that, especially in the face of criticism from abroad.
     
  14. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #14
    That doesn't mean a thing. I don't support a single thing he's done, and the only thing he will do that I support is finishing up in 2008. I don't agree with any of his opinions on the war, abortion, gay marraige, ect and I just can't respect someone I disagree with so much
     
  15. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #15
    - Mr_Ed

    Well, I guess there is a big difference between us then, I can tell you, as much as we are all british, and would stand together as such (I think!), no one would start to give any respect to someone they do not like one little bit, simply because others do like them, and I like it that way, but...then I suppose you like it your way too?
     
  16. HeWhoSpitsFire macrumors member

    HeWhoSpitsFire

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    #16
    I've disliked this administration and the so called "cheif" since day one. And I still do, perhaps more deeply than ever.

    The argument that I should respect on office alone is BS. I think our counterparts on the other side of the pond have more of a point than ever. We should heed some of the warnings of the world, else fall back into a form of isolationism we may never climb out of. :eek:
     
  17. Mr_Ed macrumors 6502

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    #17
    In the end, I suppose you are used to your way, and we are used to ours :)

    But consider this: When you come down to it, it is very difficult to get together and try to work with anyone constructively without at least showing them some courtesy and respect. Would you not agree? If someone you had to work with at your job/employer/etc. was openly disrespectful to you, I would think it would be far more difficult to get things done. I'm saying the average American would like to "get something done" regardless of political affiliation, and this is (IMHO) the reason that many say they will at least show respect for whomever is in office.
     
  18. Backtothemac macrumors 601

    Backtothemac

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    #18

    Because I was raised that the President always deserves our respect. We can disagree, we can do so through many different avenues. However, had Kerry won, I would have worked to help him, to work with him. I hold the office of the President as something that is bigger than the man. That is why I was pissed at the Republicans with the flap over Clinton. I supported Carter, I supported Clinton, and I will support anyone that holds the office that I hold so dear in my heart. I will respect it and support it through disagreement, and agreement.
     
  19. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #19
    But "I", as just a regular member of the population still have no reason to respect a leader I can't stand. Sure, I'll get on fine with all the regular people that I meet day to day regardless of what they believe (as it should be, what you believe in terms of politics/religion shouldn't even come in to whatever the task at hand is), but I still would not respect a leader that I voted against, and maybe even hate.
     
  20. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #20
    No offense, but I really do think that is an old fashioned view (as you say, it was how you were raised), and I'm glad it is too, because I don't think it's right. No one should automatically deserve respect because of their position, respect must be earned in all walks of life. All politicians are full of s*** (and anyone who thinks otherwise must be wearing blinkers), I'd have a hard time actually respecting any of them (in the true sense of the word), even if I'd voted for them.
     
  21. Mr_Ed macrumors 6502

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    #21
    I understand where you're coming from and as I said, I just think (based on my own, completely unscientific observations :)) that the average American looks at it a little differently. Not to say there aren't some who feel as you do and act accordingly.
     
  22. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #22
    Reminds me of a bumper sticker I saw on a car yesterday that said "Politicians need changing for the same reason diapers do"

    Got a chuckle out of me
     
  23. mactastic macrumors 68040

    mactastic

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    #23
    *Shrugs*
    You can respect the office, or you can start a revolution, and I don't think it's revolution time yet. Those are the choices I see.
     
  24. zelmo macrumors 603

    zelmo

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    #24
    Regardless of who the current President is, I would like to think that most Americans respect the office, even when they didn't vote for the man who holds it.
     
  25. edesignuk Moderator emeritus

    edesignuk

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    #25
    I can see where you're coming from too, not that I can say I really say I understand it, but that's probably because I'm not an American :)

    I really do hope there are more that see it my way (well, not "my" way exactly, but hopefully you know what I mean) ;)

    In essence I suppose what I'm trying to say is that a President, a Prime Minister, or anyone else for that matter should not be given automatic respect just because they are who they are, they must earn respect of the people they supposedly "lead". I do not think people these days should be teaching their children that political heads should be given respect regardless of if they actually deserve it, and I don't think that grown people should be pressured in to doing the same thing.
     

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