Christian Fundamentalist Terrorism

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by skunk, Oct 30, 2004.

  1. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #1
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A10501-2004Oct29.html
    Is there any difference? What a bunch of sickos. Fear is the key.
     
  2. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #2
    Any difference between what? Between this and Islamic terrorism? If so, then I would say "yes".

    I am not sure Islamic terrorism is primarily motivated by fear, or at least irrational fear (or fear for it's own sake). I believe Islamic terrorists are motivated by legitimate grievances and desperation against those forces. It is not like US christians are fighting for their lives or the legitimacy of their faith against a powerful invader.

    While both are prone to some pretty far-out rhetoric, all you have to do is compare the text of the latest UBL tape and that of say, Rev. Falwell to understand who has their head screwed on straighter.

    Perhaps I don't understand the question...
     
  3. skunk thread starter macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #3
    I was thinking more of the madrassahs.

    Both religious extremes exploit the fears of their adherents and use indoctrination to the point where reality is undermined, and fear of hell/hatred of apostates (which amounts to much the same thing) outweighs all rational considerations.

    I haven't ventured into Falwell Country yet. Must I? :(
     
  4. skunk thread starter macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #4
    Actually, the term "Islamic Terrorism" is not very useful: it conflates the religious and political where no such conflation is justified. It's very convenient for the Administration to classify everything as islamic terrorism, simply because to do so devalues any legitimate political grievances the Free Iraqis might have - perhaps likening them to the French Resistance would change the loading.
     
  5. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #5
    I wouldn't call it terrorism, just fear-mongering... Bush style. Maybe he learned it at Jerry Falwell's Liberty University. That part gets me.

    Fundamentalism is still dangerous though, no matter how you slice it.
     
  6. 3rdpath macrumors 68000

    3rdpath

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    #6
    while in college( in texas), i attended a falwell lecture just to see if the man was being represented fairly in the media..

    i have NEVER witnessed such thinly veiled hatred cloaked in a shroud of christianity.

    he is truly a sadly delusional, and dangerous, man.
     
  7. blackfox macrumors 65816

    blackfox

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    #7
    Since you defined your question more since I last posted, I tend to agree with your points. With regards to my use of the phrase "Islamic Terrorism", that was probably sloppy wording on my part, but it belies the fact that the definitions of these words being bandied about are vague and differ wildly depending on who you talk to. I believe "Islamic fundamentalism" would have been a more appropriate phrasing for me to use, and of course fundamentalism is fundamentalism, whether there is "islamic" or "christian" in front of it...

    I will say, however, that your point about religious and political conflation may not be accurate. I say this because Islam in particular seems to have a role in the societies it is established that transcend mere religious matters. The pervasity of Islam in shaping the very character of a society is somewhat a unique phenomenom and I feel one of the reasons we in the West have such trouble understanding some of the motivations and logic of these Muslim countries.

    What the Bush Administration does, however, is obviously simplify a complex issue and they most certainly conflate disparate issues for their own interests. I agree wholeheartedly about your comment(s) that these distortions and simplifications can be used to discredit an otherwise legitimate political goal of the Iraqis to self-determination. The use of clever "loaded" labels to simplify the issue and obscure the truth is, of course, nothing new for this Administration in any area.

    The interesting thing to consider when making such a comparison, is what you can learn from that comparison. If indeed the two are similar, then you can make reasonable assumptions about the one from the other.

    Looking at Christian Fundamentalism here in the US, you can see it is often looked at askew by the majority of the population and is a marginal proportion of the whole society. It is nevertheless well-funded and is therefore able to make more noise than it's representation would normally suggest. Still, a well-educated and peaceful society generally has little time for let alone support for their issues, and many normal Christians despise the perversion of their faith by this segment.

    When there is a time of unrest and problems however, and people are unsure and fearful, these Fundamentalists are able to capitilize on these emotions, whether it be in the war against an "evil" enemy (of God) or of social change (such as gay marriage).

    I could go on, but I believe you get the idea...and so one can reasonably assume what the correct policy is for dealing with Islamic fundamentalists and the terrorism they often spawn, by looking here at home at least as far as the comparison between the two holds up. It is not hard to see imo, that we are approaching the problem poorly.

    Comments?
     
  8. wowser macrumors 6502a

    wowser

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    #8
    I am not sure what sort of link is being made, here. Are you saying that these fundamental Christian groups use the same techiques against fellow Americans as fundamental Muslims use to shock their fellow Muslims into adopting a more radical position?
     
  9. skunk thread starter macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #9
    Exactly. And both positions are hateful.
     
  10. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #10
    Yes. Or are you forgetting those abortion clinic and church explosions? Or Oklahoma City? Same type of thing. Fundamentialism is always a bad thing and always makes the moderates and true believers look bad, while the nut jobs get the press coverage.

    It may be worse with those suicide bombers, but it is a slippery slope.
     
  11. gastroboy macrumors newbie

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    #11
    It also ignores the same ignorance and irrationality that drove the terrorists acts inside the USA by its own citizens, as instanced in Oklahoma.

    The Bush Administration has of course found it much easier and more useful to externalise the terrorist threat than tackle the crypto-fascism which is an extreme element within its own support. It is also so driven by self-interest and personal gain along with its own narrow vision that it repeatedly falls into the trap of acting to further Al Quaida's objectives of driving a wedge between the USA and Israel, and the rest of the world.

    Osama bin Laden has with limited resources got Bush to do all his dirt work for him.
     

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