Classic Emulation on Intel

Discussion in 'Games' started by harveypooka, Dec 3, 2006.

  1. harveypooka macrumors 65816

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2004
    #1
    I have such games classics as Carmaggedon 2 that I want to play on my Intel Mac. I've looked around at some emulation options, but I've not really read any reviews. Has anyone used them? How are they for gaming?
     
  2. Spanky Deluxe macrumors 601

    Spanky Deluxe

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Location:
    London, UK
    #2
    I don't think they'd be very good for gaming, not for 3D gaming at least. You'd be best off trying to find a copy for Windows and running it under Boot Camp if you want to play Classic games such as Carmageddon 2 and Tomb Raider.
     
  3. harveypooka thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Feb 24, 2004
    #3
    Damn. I wonder, with all the advances in processors and their ability to truly multi-task, decode multiple streams, give us access to new and exciting things - can't we just play the old stuff?
     
  4. greatdevourer macrumors 68000

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    Aug 5, 2005
    #4
    The problem is that you're emulating an emulator, which gets very... very... very... slooow... (this annoys me greatly, as it prevents me from installing Quake 3 :mad:)
     
  5. beige matchbox macrumors 6502a

    beige matchbox

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    Mar 16, 2005
    Location:
    Oxfordshire, UK
    #5
    i've been experimenting with sheepshaver (on a PC laptop running ubuntu) the last few days, still trying to get an os fully working. I have it booting from one of my old restore cds with 8.6 on, but it wont let me install. I think this is partly because it thinks the image i'm using for it's hdd is a floppy... a 1Gb floppy :D lol, and partly because it's a restore disk and not a full retail copy

    If i can dig out a copy of OS 9 i'll have a go with that, but i can't find the box at the mo, and the copy that came with 10.1 isn't in the box :rolleyes:


    I (well, my dad *cough*) should have an intel mac sometime next week, so i'll have a go with the macos universal version of sheepshaver and see what happens :)



    THe main raeson for doing this, is like a lot of people, i have stacks of old mac games and nowhere to setup an old mac :eek:
     
  6. harveypooka thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Feb 24, 2004
    #6
    I'd love to give it a go but my parents have my old iMac MacOS 9 discs and I think they gave it away...damn! I just don't see why Apple don't release OS9 as abandonware! Do they still sell it?
     
  7. beige matchbox macrumors 6502a

    beige matchbox

    Joined:
    Mar 16, 2005
    Location:
    Oxfordshire, UK
    #7
    you can pick it up on ebay for £5 or something. And apple have the 7.5 (or there abouts) disks for download on their site :)
     
  8. harveypooka thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Feb 24, 2004
    #8
    Ahh, I didn't know Apple had 7.5 for download! Not sure I can stand the pain of 7.5 again! :)
     
  9. aidanpendragon macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2005
    #9
    Tough on PPC, Worse on Intel?

    I've been experimenting with SheepShaver on my G4 eMac, trying to run OS9 games (Myth, Mechwarrior 2) that don't like OSX & Classic. It takes a narrow range of OS, 8.5 to 9.0.something, although you can use a Restore disk to get it; in fact, that works better, as Install disks are usually hardware-matched. Search here or on Macintouch for directions on how to do so (something about opening/copying the system folder image off the Restore disk). Obviously, you should own both the disks and the hardware you're getting the ROM from (thank you beige G3).

    In any case, I have gotten it up & running. But, it's certainly not-ready-for-prime-time in regards to gaming. I actually got Myth to boot & got partway through the first level, albeit with lots of audio glitches. MW2, less success. Usually, a SheepShaver crash is the end result.

    Keep in mind, this is on a PPC chip, which runs OS9 programs "natively" via SheepShaver b/c there's no processor to emulate. I expect that true emulation on an Intel chip would yield even worse results as to speed and stability. If you have some low-impact accounting software that's OS9-only, SheepShaver could be a decent option. But games...if Classic on OSX/PPC doesn't like them, I don't think this emulator would on any platform.
     
  10. Antares macrumors 68000

    Antares

    #10
    I would love this, too, since I have plenty of Classic games that I either never finished or would like to play again... My Pismo's lcd is fading, it's hard drive is dying and the "yo-yo" power cord doesn't always seem to work anymore. Classic emulation would be my only option right now.
     
  11. Queso macrumors G4

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2006
    #11
    SheepShaver works passably on my iMac G5 (1.9GHz Rev C). I got Master of Orion II running on it to get around that stupid error in Classic that makes the game crash.

    It is faster than it was under Classic on my old iMac G3, and obviously more stable, but nothing to write home about.
     
  12. Antares macrumors 68000

    Antares

    #12
    In all practicality, I'm assuming that we have to accept that Classic, on Intel Macs, is just not going to happen. It will be at least another 15 to 20 years until we will be able to emulate Mac OS 9 flawlessly and at full speed....possibly on the eventual Quantum Macs. :cool:
     
  13. bobber205 macrumors 68020

    bobber205

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    Nov 15, 2005
    Location:
    Oregon
  14. harveypooka thread starter macrumors 65816

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    Feb 24, 2004
    #14

    What is it that makes it so difficult to emulate? Is it the fact it has to load the entire OS into memory and then emulate a processor? What are the complications?
     
  15. aidanpendragon macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2005
    #15
    I'm no expert, but...if you're referring to the OS-level emulation itself, the software has to emulate a processor, interface with your physical hardware (RAM, video, HDD, buses, etc.) It takes a lotta processor power to emulate a different chip in software, let alone run anything through it. Games are doubly difficult because they tend to stress precisely those systems the most, as well as making calls to more obscure libraries & routines that might not be emulated as well. That latter problem owes something to the fact that most/all emulators are built by third parties, who can match neither the expertise nor the budgets that the original developers could bring to play.

    Somebody help me out here.
     

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